Bridge between Journal and Weblog

An Interview with Marko Demantowsky (PHW) by Mareike König (DHI Paris)

We are an international and multilingual journal that addresses the public use of history; our contributors are historians who are specialists in fields of the didactics of history and historical culture.


 

Die originale deutschsprachige Variante des Interviews vom 5.2.2015
finden Sie auf dem Weblog des Deutschen Historischen Instituts in Paris.
Siehe hier.

 

Mareike König (MK): Public History Weekly (PHW) is a BlogJournal devoted to the topics of history and the didactics of history that is available under Open Access at the website of the Oldenbourg/De Gruyter publishing house. What exactly is a BlogJournal or, in other words, what makes Public History Weekly a blog and in what respect is it more like a journal?

Marko Demantowsky (MD): We are an international and multilingual journal that addresses the public use of history; our contributors are historians who are specialists in the field of the didactics of history and historical culture. Since our launch in September 2013, we have published 63 issues, each of which contains one to two so-called initial contributions. To date, we have received 190 commentaries in response, most of which are very detailed and competent.

Indeed, the format is a new kind of hybrid, closer to a weekly magazine than a weblog. The initial question was: how should a journal in our field, today, be designed, in order to reach as many readers as possible? Many of the features of weblogs appeared, to us, to be extremely useful for this new kind of journal. And the spirit of blogging—writing unpolished texts, making oneself vulnerable — seemed to be a good approach to reach interested readers as well.

But, of course, there are important differences, compared to a weblog, particularly in terms of publication frequency and format standards. Readers can be sure that:

  • the contributions are published with never-failing regularity at a specified time, in fact a specified minute: Thursdays, at 8 am CET.
  • they have a prescribed format and meet all the requirements of academic publishing.
  • the comments are supervised editorially. PHW only publishes material that has been examined closely for formal aspects and content.
  • the comments are also published at specified times.
  • comments can be made with complete freedom. However, for most contributions, we ask one or two experts for their opinions (peer comment).

But we also differ, naturally, from specialist academic journals in several respects:

  • Our thematic articles start with an initial contribution that should be “offensive”, not isolated, and aim at a direct discussion. The subsequent indexing in scientific databases, undertaken according to all the rules in the book, then refers to the complete text unit and includes the initial contributions, comments and author responses (“Replik”). These multi-perspective, controversial texts are, in my opinion, a completely new text category. In order to achieve this, the thread must also be closed after the author responds. Social digital publishing doesn’t have to be a never-ending meandering event; the whole thing can only be cited once it is completed (see also Groebner’s criticism of digital publishing).
  • We work with a stable team of “core authors” who commit themselves for at least two years. This unique feature has been chosen for very pragmatic reasons: a reliable weekly publication date requires an absolutely reliable infrastructure for the editors and authors. With the help of our team, we can develop editorial plans 12 months in advance. In addition, authors who write for us face completely new challenges that result in a professionalization process related to the specific format. Our authors receive intensive support in this process from the editorial board and at the yearly Editorial Meetings in Basel. In addition guest authors repeatedly publish additional posts as surprise.

And, finally: we are not a classical publisher’s production and are not anchored to publishers’ sites; instead we are a co-operation project between the School of Education at the Northwestern Switzerland University of Applied Sciences and Arts and the De Gruyter Oldenbourg publishing house. This is why the website is neutral; the technical infrastructure, however, is provided and maintained by the publisher. This also expresses our novel hybrid character. We are putting the useless confrontation between “old” science publishers and new cultures of publication behind us. De Gruyter Oldenbourg, and in particular Martin Rethmeier, deserve a great deal of credit for undertaking this (expensive) experiment.

MK: The subtitle of PHW is: “BlogJournal for History and Civics Education”. Which topics are dealt with in the weekly issues? How do you recruit your authors?

MD: This subtitle needs to be modified. On Twitter () and Facebook (), we appear as a BlogJournal on Public Use of History and History & Civics Education. However, the explicit connection to the didactics of history makes sense to us because we feel that including what happens in schools in the critical debate on historical culture is important for both sides and is—at least in the Anglo-Saxon community—new. Teaching history at school is a sublime expression of the predominating underlying historical narrative and it requires critical integration into historical culture. Similarly, we won’t be able to understand the recipients of material and conceptions offered by museums or the mass media if we ignore the fact that the teaching of history a school is an instance of historical socialization. We want to merge both discourses at PHW.

Our core authors have complete freedom of choice for the topics of their individual contributions. Of course, the yearly meetings and discussions there help to decide on a promising spectrum of possible topics, but in terms of text submission, the decisive factor is the pure passion, far removed from traditional academic activities, with which authors are prepared to get involved with us.

In a first step, we made a conscious effort to contact relatively young, prestigious, but not necessarily web-oriented professors in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland and encountered a great deal of sympathy, for which I am, after two years, still very grateful. In a second step, in 2014, we expanded our team to include authors writing in other languages. The aim was to gain leading representatives of the separate discourses on Public History from Argentina, Australia, Canada, Mexico, Russia, South Africa, Turkey, and USA. This has also been successful. In autumn 2015, PHW will undertake a further step towards globalization.

MK: A quick look at the statistics, if this is permitted: How often is the weekly issue of the BlogJournal accessed? Which topics are particularly favored, in terms of access and the commentaries?

MD: A few months ago, my response to this question was less reserved than today. This is because I don’t really trust very much the counting methods available to us. We have our own WordPress counter, and the WordPress Add-on Google Analytics Summary as well as the Google Analytics Tool itself are also available. Each with its own counts. If one sticks to the Google tool, which seems to me to be the most reliable, then it is important to remember that users with cookie blockers won’t be included. In terms of our tech-savvy readership, this is probably a significant number. Thus, the numbers should be treated with caution and the data are, basically, hard to verify … Google Analytics, however, offers several interesting features that allow us to recognize tendencies. At a conservative estimate, we had last year at least 4000 regular readers (approx. 32 000 unique clients). Last September, we switched to multilingual publication and, since then, the readership has grown and has become, naturally, more international.

In actual fact, the numbers of accesses for the various contributions differ greatly. In each case, this is not a good/bad criterion; specific features attract particular attention. Nevertheless, since 2013 real PHW stars who can claim stable and great success have developed; for instance, Prof. Dr. Markus Bernhardt, who was honored by our Advisory Board for his work in 2013/14. For all our authors, however, topics that promise important new information, argue a special case, and offer points of attack are really successful. Our articles are truly objectionable, if they work well. One last point: In the first few months, interest was very much focused on individual contributions; now, however, we can see that interest has become more diversified. This is due, on the one hand, to the increased number of contributions (79, to date) and, on the other, to features that were added later, after the launch. These include the menus for issues and contents, which make the variety and number of our articles constantly available, just like a classical list of contents. Thus, we are no longer just a kind of weekly magazine, but, rather, and increasingly, a pool for ideas and incentives.

MK: The contributions to the BlogJournal can be commented upon, but not randomly. They are supervised by the editors and, according to the guidelines, they should represent a “serious confrontation with the initial contribution”. Commentaries are solicited sometimes, and they are only activated during office hours. After a few weeks, the commentary thread is closed. Why do you have these restrictions?

MD: I’ve given some of the answers above. I’d now just like to go into more detail about one important aspect: social media have a poor reputation outside of the “social media bubble”. This is, naturally, partly based on a certain basic culturally conservative aloofness towards the web. In part, it is also, and naturally, based on more or less substantial experience with truly undesirable developments in communication within the social media, above all with internet trolling. Our main task is, thus, is to reduce this resistance and to emphasize the academic potential beyond these problems. We really see ourselves as bridge builders. We have, therefore, constructed a tool that exploits the benefits of social media for academic communication and, at the same time, tries to reduce the risks. We achieve this by a small retardation of real time and through careful and very liberal moderation.

MK: What have you experienced with the commentary function? How difficult is it to persuade scientists to write commentaries?

MD: Very often, really difficult. My response above provides some of the reasons. However, what we can already say is that good (in terms of the format: objectionable) contributions don’t have to wait long before commentaries come in. However, we are very interested in inviting additional experts to join the discussion, even though their over-stretched time budgets might make them reluctant to do this. Some prominent voices also basically expect to be invited. So much for the peer comments.

There is a further factor, and it also relevant for the initial contributions: many colleagues are quite unused to write for a real public—as we reach it, for sure subject-specifically. You wake up from writing texts for collective volumes and are supposed to write something for us, if possible from one day to the next. So fast, so public, so controversial! This obviously evokes feelings of trepidation in some. At the moment, there is no alternative to this, but it also characterizes the great challenge that highly specialized science is suddenly facing, today more than ever in the age of digital transition. The professional dimension of a “public intellectual” is something that many colleagues are completely unaware of.

MK: Do you have any tips and suggestions for bloggers who would like to attract more comments? What should they pay attention to? Or, are comments over-rated?

MD: No, comments are not over-rated; in fact, they are the tonic of digital and social publishing.

The basic problem in persuading prestigious researchers to write comments is one of economics: Time is so limited, the backlog of work is so big, that one has to choose a criterion for accepting or rejecting extra tasks. If the chosen criterion is not financial, then it is usually reputation enhancement. Through our cooperation with a respected academic publisher, through our choice of the renowned core author team and the members of the Advisory Board, and through our investment in providing a database indexing and an appropriate layout, we have tried to solve the reputation problem. This was and still is a major challenge, particularly from the perspective of establishing a sustainable allocation of reputation! I think we are on a good track.

MK: Can a hybrid between a blog and a journal, as exemplified by the “Public History Weekly”, help blogging to become more academically acceptable?

MD: Yes, I hope so. More generally, the hope is that increasingly more colleagues will use PHW’s bridge to accept communication in the social media, to understand the potential that these formats offer and also to recognize how important it is to be heard and be visible there.

MK: Do you blog yourself? If so, about what?

MD: As the managing editor of PHW, I expose myself to the evaluation and discussion of my own initial contributions. That sometimes leads to a double blind, but I also enjoy it. Because of my time-consuming tasks in Basle, my “normal” academic workload, and my editorial work at PHW, I can’t maintain my own blog (but my chair, however, does have one). In an ideal world, I would have the time for it, and I hope that it will be possible, at some point. I understand and value the principle of academic blogging and I really greatly admire those colleagues who blog; I don’t want to name them individually here, but they know whom I mean.

MK: How is the BlogJournal going to proceed? What are your plans for the future? Will the scales tip more towards a journal or more towards a blog?

MD: The first thing we will do is cultivating our hybrid nature. I believe that this is the only way to exercise our function as a bridge. The cooperation agreement runs till 2016, and it also guarantees our financing. My university has invested a lot of money in the editorial work, and the publisher has done the same for the technical infrastructure and marketing. At the moment, we don’t know what will happen after 2016. Our novel multilinguality, in particular, has created costs that we did not originally budget for. This spring, we will start a crowdfunding, and it would be really important for the project to receive contributions from as many of our readers as possible.

MK: Many thanks for this interview!

___________________

This interview is a contribution to the blog parade “Wissenschaftsbloggen – zurück in die Zukunft #wbhyp”. Marko Demantowsky replied in writing to the interviewer’s questions.

____________________

Image Credits
Altmodische Telegrafenleitung (2008) by Klaus Stricker / Pixelio.

Recommended Citation
A Bridge between Journal and Weblog. An Interview instead of an Editorial by Mareike König with Marko Demantowsky. In: Public History Weekly 3 (2015) 4, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-3461.

Translation by Jana Kaiser

Copyright (c) 2015 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

The post Bridge between Journal and Weblog appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/3-2015-4/bridge-journal-weblog-instead-editorial/

Weiterlesen

“Public History” – Sublation of a German Debate?

 

The English term “Public History” is, as is so common for borrowed foreign words, discursively relaxing; an argumentative deus ex machina. It appears as an ideal compromise in a long …

 


 

English

The English term “Public History” is, as is so common for borrowed foreign words, discursively relaxing; an argumentative deus ex machina. It appears as an ideal compromise in a long-lasting and confusing German debate. There is much to be said in favour of this new approach and also for putting an end to theoretical pseudo-debates.

 

 

Concerto vivace

The German debate about how to understand the massive increase in public interest in the past, which started in the late 1970s and was particularly focussed on the individual national histories of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, has been in progress since the end of the 1980s.[1] This debate appears to be increasingly self-referential—the bibliography could fill a book—and it deals with a wide range of competing concepts. Sometimes they refer to special, limited forms such as, for instance, the terms politics of the past (Vergangenheitspolitik; Frei) or politics of history (Geschichtspolitik; Wolfrum). However, they usually claim to cover the entire spectrum of phenomena related to how the past is dealt with publicly: Lieux de mémoire or memorial sites (Erinnerungsorte; Francois/Schulze, Kreis etc.), collective memory (Kollektives Gedächtnis; Assmann & Assmann and others), culture of remembrance (Erinnerungskultur; Cornelissen and others), historical culture (Geschichtskultur; Rüsen, Schönemann and others) and, recently, also in German-speaking areas: Public History (“Öffentliche Geschichte”; P. Nolte)[2]. Within the historical sciences, a prevailing and lively competition between the concepts of culture of remembrance and historical culture has emerged. This conceptual competition, which has become highly charged with respect to science policy, has become a long-standing obstacle to a constructive, scientific investigation of concrete research problems; it leads to a fragmentation of discourse and also prevents institutions from targeting useful strategies.

Simple Solution

Individuals can, of course, pursue their own valid interests; nevertheless, the relationship between the concepts of a culture of remembrance and historical culture is, in substance, completely clear: the culture of remembrance is contemporary historical culture. In other words, the culture of remembrance is, due to its contemporary character, fluid and volatile. Once the negotiated contents of the culture of remembrance are correctly formatted institutionally and viewed calmly, as well as spelled out academically, they become material for historical culture.
The two terms are by no means mutually exclusive; they are, in fact, complementary. What is needed is a dynamic understanding of contemporary history, based on a generational perspective and that does not rely on the common conventions of epochal fixation.[3] Accordingly, contemporary history is consistently understood as the “epoch of those now alive,”[4] or also, as the continuously changing/moving stage of “communicative memory.”[5] In other words, contemporary history is, here, the epoch of contemporary witnesses who, with the privilege, the anxiety, and the furore of personal experience, create non-professional meanings/interpretations that are able to assert themselves alongside professionally underpinned meanings/interpretations. This mixture creates the culture of remembrance, in its authentic sense without allegorical understanding, since the professionals are also involved biographically.
Cooling down these quarrels transforms, so to speak, the discourse on meaning related to the past into a different state, allowing the emergence of historical culture that is partially, but significantly, negotiated, nurtured, and contested in another manner.[6] Thus, the concepts of a culture of remembrance and historical culture not only can be used complementarily[7] but they definitely should be used in this way. Only then is it possible to gain analytical access to the historical dynamics and volatility of the construction of cultural identity.

It is an Umbrella

What remains, naturally, is the more or less obvious theoretical fuzziness, as well as the incompatibility of the two existing terms.[8] Would it not make sense to leave these as they are and to trust that successively more abstract insights into the dynamics of historical culture will result from individual research projects and the discussion thereof, as well as from concrete empirical evidence? More careful observation reveals that both abstract approaches are already used extensively, in the form of an “umbrella-concept,”[9] in research and educational practice. Individual use may frequently differ, but the goal is always the same. This is fine. And this is why one should not pretend to be using—in terms of the analogy—different devices. But there is already another conceptual approach bringing in this respect everyone and everything adequately under an umbrella[10]:

Public History

And now to Public History. The term makes German-language purists sweat, sure. However, I think that the adoption of the concept into German is a wonderful opportunity to put old differences behind us. It is the best “umbrella” that is currently available. Obviously, it offers the important connection to the very broad debate in English[11]; this alone would be a first important benefit. But there are even more advantages:

  • Public History makes the actors involved in the communication of history visible, not only as objects for analysis and evaluation; it also supports their positive self-image. This opens the door to a constructive level of communication between production and analytical criticism, whose absence is symptomatically exemplified by the petty, long-lasting bashing to which Guido Knopp[12] was subjected. The important point here is the challenging blending of discourses and not a schrebergartization (a narrow-minded reduction into fragmented allotments).
  • The reinforcing amalgamation of the various approaches and professions makes institutional innovations possible. There is a long overdue need to provide students of history with career perspectives besides academia and school teaching. This is already happening in Berlin (FU), Heidelberg, and Cologne. The demand for such professionals exists.
  • The english-speaking Public History discourse doesn’t include the research and practics on history teaching in school. That is a blind spot, mutually. And it is a worthful experience German colleagues could invest in a joined debate.
  • Finally, the concept of PUBLIC history makes historians whose work is funded by taxpayers’ money increasingly aware of a professional dimension that has to be learned anew: science must go public, now more than ever.
  • This, in turn, leads to the heart of the current challenges: Public History must be analysed, understood, and produced digitally; otherwise, it will barely work out today and not at all tomorrow.[13]

____________________

Literature

  • The Public Historian (published for the National Council for Public History), University of Califonia Press, ISSN 0272-3433.
  • Popp, Susanne u.a. (Hrsg.): Zeitgeschichte – Medien – Historische Bildung. Göttingen 2010 (Beihefte zur Zeitschrift für Geschichtsdidaktik, 2).
  • Zürndorf, Irmgard: Zeitgeschichte und Public History, Version: 1.0, vgl. Docupedia-Zeitgeschichte, 11.02.2010, http://docupedia.de/zg/Public_History (Letzter Zugriff 22.1.2015)

Web resources

____________________

[1] See Rüsen, Jörn: Lebendige Geschichte. Göttingen 1989. / Hardtwig, Wolfgang: Geschichtskultur und Wissenschaft. München 1990.
[2] Nolte, Paul: Öffentliche Geschichte. Die neue Nähe von Fachwissenschaft, Massenmedien und Publikum: Ursachen, Chancen und Grenzen. In: Barricelli, Michele / Hornig, Julia (Hrsg.): Aufklärung, Bildung, «Histotainment»? Zeitgeschichte in Unterricht und Gesellschaft heute. Frankfurt/M. 2008, p. 131-146, here especially p. 143.
[3] For a very consistent differentiation between several contemporary histories, see Hockerts, Hans-Günther: Zugänge zur Zeitgeschichte. Primärerfahrung, Erinnerungskultur, Geschichtswissenschaft. In: APuZ (2001) B28, p. 15-30.
[4] As formulated by Hans Rothfels (1952) whose argumentation in his meanwhile classical essay on the subject is admittedly indecisive, as is well known.
[5] Assmann, Jan: Das kulturelle Gedächtnis. Schrift, Erinnerung und politische Identität in frühen Hochkulturen. München 1992, p. 48-56, following Vansina, Jan: Oral Tradition as History. Nairobi 1985.
[6] It is thus only logical that, particularly in Germany, the concept of a culture of remembrance is used very frequently because, as a negative reference to National Socialism, it represents an important aspect of the raison d’état. Consequently, the transition to another form of producing meaning has numerous political and didactic implications. See Volkhard Knigge: Abschied von der Erinnerung. Anmerkungen zum notwendigen Wandel der Gedenkkultur in Deutschland. In: id./ Frei, Norbert (ed.): Verbrechen erinnern. Die Auseinandersetzung mit Holocaust und Völkermord. München 2002, p. 423-440.
[7] Korte, Barbara / Paletschek, Sylvia: Geschichte in populären Medien und Genres: Vom Historischen Roman zum Computerspiel. In: id. (ed.): History Goes Pop. Zur Repräsentation von Geschichte in populären Medien und Genres. Bielefeld 2009, p. 9-60, here p. 11, FN 6.
[8] See Cornelißen, Christoph: Was heißt Erinnerungskultur? Begriff – Methoden – Perspektiven. In: GWU 54 (2003), 548-563. / Demantowsky, Marko: Geschichtskultur und Erinnerungskultur – zwei Konzeptionen des einen Gegenstandes. In: GPD 33 (2005) 1/2, p. 11-20 (online: https://www.academia.edu/4714387/Geschichtskultur_und_Erinnerungskultur._Zwei_Konzeptionen_des_einen_Gegenstandes_2005_, last accessed 22.1.15). See also, amongst others, the contributions of Wolfgang Hasberg (2004/2006) and Elisabeth Erdmann (2007).
[9] Grever, Maria: Fear of Plurality. Historical Culture and Historiographical Canonization in Western Europe. In: Epple, Angelika / Schaser, Angelika (eds.): Gendering Historiography: Beyond National Canons. Frankfurt/M., New York 2009, p. 45-62, here p. 54f.

[10] Jordanova, Ludmilla: History in Practice. London / New York 2000, S. 149 (tnx to Alix Green for the friendly hint).
[11] Note, for instance, the projects and successes of the International Federation for Public History (IFPH) (URL: http://ifph.hypotheses.org, last accessed 22.1.15) or those of the United States National Council for Public History (NCPH) (URL: http://ncph.org , last accessed 22.1.15). An early German inventory Rauthe, Simone: Public History in den USA und der Bundesrepublik Deutschland. Essen 2001. See also Bösch/Goschler with a specific focus Bösch, Frank/ Goschler, Constantin (eds.): Public History. Öffentliche Darstellungen des Nationalsozialismus jenseits der Geschichtswissenschaft. Frankfurt/M. 2009. See finally the recent foundation of SIG “Applied History” within the Association of German Historians (VHD): http://www.historikerverband.de/arbeitsgruppen/ag-angewandte-geschichte.html

[12] Guido Knopp is a famous and infamous, but anyhow very successful German TV producer, specialized on history broadcasting for a wide audience. See for more information the wikipedia article (weblink).
[13] Hoffmann, Moritz: Geschichte braucht Öffentlichkeit. Vom Nutzen einer digitalen Public History. In: resonanzboden. Der Blog der Ullstein Buchverlage v. 14.01.2015, URL: http://www.resonanzboden.com/satzbaustelle/geschichte-braucht-oeffentlichkeit-vom-nutzen-einer-digitalen-public-history/ (last accessed 22.1.15)

____________________

Image Credits
Arne Eickenberg (2007): A possible mêchanê model as used in ancient Greek theater, http://en.citizendium.org/wiki/File:Mechane_GreekTheater.jpg (Last accessed 21.1.2015).

Recommended Citation
Demantowsky, Marko: “Public History” – Sublation of a German Debate? In: Public History Weekly 3 (2015) 3, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-3292.

Copyright (c) 2015 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Deutsch

Der englischsprachige Begriff “Public History” ist, wie so häufig entlehnte Fremdwörter, diskursiv spannungslösend, ein argumentativer deus ex machina. Er erscheint als idealer Kompromiss in einer lange und verwirrend geführten deutschsprachigen Debatte. Vieles spricht für diesen Neuansatz, Vieles auch dafür, theoretische Scheindebatten zu beenden.

 

Concerto vivace

Die deutschsprachige Debatte darüber, wie man das seit Ende der 1970er enorm ansteigende öffentliche Interesse an der Vergangenheit, insbesondere der jeweils eigenen nationalen in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz, verstehen solle, währt schon seit Ende der 1980er Jahre.[1] Sie erscheint zunehmend selbstreferentiell, und man kann dazu in Buchstärke bibliographieren. In dieser Debatte gibt es einen ganzen Strauß konkurrierender Konzepte. Mal bezeichnen sie abgrenzbare Spezialformen, etwa bei den Begriffen der Vergangenheitspolitik (Frei) oder der Geschichtspolitik (Wolfrum). Meist beanspruchen sie aber, den gesamten Phänomenkomplex des öffentlichen Umgangs mit der Vergangenheit zu erfassen: Lieux de mémoire bzw. Erinnerungsorte (Francois/Schulze, Kreis u.v.a.), Kollektives Gedächtnis (Assmann & Assmann u.a.), Erinnerungskultur (Cornelissen u.v.a.), Geschichtskultur (Rüsen, Schönemann u.v.a.) und neuerdings nun auch im deutschsprachigen Raum: Public History resp. Öffentliche Geschichte (P. Nolte)[2]. In der Geschichtswissenschaft hat sich eine dominierende und rege Konkurrenz der Konzepte Erinnerungskultur und Geschichtskultur ergeben. Diese konzeptuelle Konkurrenz, die sich wissenschaftspolitisch stark aufgeladen hat, behindert längst eine konstruktive wissenschaftliche Auseinandersetzung über konkrete Forschungsprobleme, sie führt zur diskursiven Parzellierung. Sie hindert auch sinnvolle institutionelle Weichenstellungen.

Einfache Lösung

Es mag jeder seine berechtigten Interessen verfolgen, der Sache nach ist es jedoch eigentlich vollkommen klar, wie sich die Konzepte Erinnerungskultur und Geschichtskultur zueinander verhalten: Die Erinnerungskultur ist die zeitgeschichtliche Geschichtskultur. Anders formuliert: Erinnerungskultur ist durch ihre zeitgeschichtliche Prägung in einem flüssigen, volatilen Zustand. Sobald die verhandelten Inhalte der Erinnerungskultur institutionell zurechtformatiert und beruhigt sowie akademisch ausbuchstabiert worden sind, werden sie zu Gegenständen der Geschichtskultur.
Beide Begriffe schließen einander also keinesfalls aus, sondern sie verhalten sich vielmehr komplementär zueinander. Vorausgesetzt wird ein dynamisches, generationenbezogenes Verständnis von Zeitgeschichte, das sich nicht auf die üblichen Konventionen der Epochenfixierung[3] einlässt. Zeitgeschichte wird demnach konsequent als die “Epoche der Mitlebenden” verstanden,[4] oder auch als die stetig wandernde Zeitspanne des “kommunikativen Gedächtnisses”.[5] Mit anderen Worten ist Zeitgeschichte hier die Epoche der Zeitzeugen, die mit dem Recht, der Angst und dem Furor des Erlebthabens non-professionelle Sinnstiftungen produzieren, die sich neben professionell verstärkten Sinnstiftungen zu behaupten vermögen. Dieses Gemenge stellt Erinnerungskultur im eigentlichen, also nicht-allegorischen Sinne her (zumal ja auch die Profis biographisch involviert sind). Die Erkaltung dieser Händel überführt den vergangenheitsbezogenen Sinnstiftungsdiskurs gleichsam in einen anderen Aggregatzustand, lässt Geschichtskultur entstehen, die partiell, aber signifikant auf andere Weise verhandelt, gepflegt und bestritten wird.[6] Die Konzepte Erinnerungskultur und Geschichtskultur können also nicht nur ergänzend verwendet werden,[7] sie sollten es auch unbedingt. Erst dadurch erlangt man nämlich einen analytischen Zugriff auf die historische Dynamik und Volatilität kultureller Identitätskonstruktion.

Es ist ein Schirm

Es bleiben natürlich noch die mehr oder minder ausgeprägten theoretischen Unschärfen und die Inkompatibilitäten beider Konzepte.[8] Wäre es nicht sinnvoll, diese pragmatisch auf sich beruhen zu lassen, und darauf zu vertrauen, dass sich aus einzelnen Forschungsprojekten und ihrer Diskussion, aus der konkreten Empirie, sukzessive abstraktere Einsichten in geschichtskulturelle Dynamiken ergeben? Wenn man genau hinschaut, werden beide abstrakte Ansätze in Forschung und Vermittlungspraxis längst als “Umbrella-Konzepte”[9] verwendet: Jeder benutzt sie immer wieder anders, aber alle zum gleichen Zweck. Gut so. Und deshalb sollte man auch nicht so tun, als ob man – um im Gleichnis zu bleiben – verschiedene Geräte benutzen würde. Es gibt übrigens in dieser Hinsicht ein begriffliches Konzept, dem schon sehr früh und mit grosser Wirkung die Fähigkeit und Aufgabe zugeschrieben worden ist, alle und alles adäquat unter einen Schirm zu bringen[10], und zwar:

Public History

Und jetzt also das, Public History. Allen SprachpuristInnen steht gewiss der Schweiß auf der Stirn. Mir scheint die deutschsprachige Adoption dieses Konzepts aber eine glückliche Gelegenheit zu sein, alte Differenzen hinter sich zu lassen. Es ist der beste “Schirm”, den man derzeit finden kann. Selbstverständlich bietet er den wichtigen Anschluss an die sehr reiche englischsprachige Debatte,[11] das allein wäre ein erstes gewichtiges Plus. Aber es gibt da noch mehr Vorteile:

  • Public History macht die AkteurInnen der historischen Vermittlungspraxis nicht nur als Analyse- und Urteilsobjekte sichtbar, sondern eignet sich auch für deren positives Selbstverständnis. Das eröffnet endlich eine konstruktive Kommunikationsebene zwischen “praktischer” Produktion und “theoretischer” Kritik, deren Fehlen sich im jahrelangen billigen Knopp-Bashing symptomatisch exemplifiziert hat. Auch hier kommt es doch auf ein herausforderndes Verbinden von Diskursen an und nicht auf eine spießige Schrebergartisierung.
  • Die stärkende Verbindung der unterschiedlichen Ansätze und Professionen macht institutionelle Innovationen möglich. Wie in Berlin (FU), Heidelberg und Köln geschehen, ist es längst nötig, Geschichtsstudierenden neben Wissenschaft und Schule weitere fachberufliche Perspektiven zu erschließen. Die doppelte Nachfrage gibt es. Die Universitäten sollten dieser Verantwortung nachkommen.
  • Der englischsprachige Public-History-Diskurs bezieht ausweislich seiner gängigen Definitionen bis heute die Geschichtsdidaktik (“history teaching”) nicht mit ein. Das erzeugt wechselseitig blinde Flecken. Hier hat der deutschsprachige Diskurs etwas Wichtiges zu bieten.
  • Schließlich rückt das Konzept der PUBLIC History eine professionelle Dimension aller steuermittelfinanzierter HistorikerInnen ins Bewusstsein, die von vielen erst wieder erlernt werden muss: Wissenschaft muss sich öffentlich machen, mehr denn je.
  • Dies führt wiederum zum letzten Kern aktueller Herausforderungen: Public History muss als digitale analysiert, begriffen und produziert werden, oder sie hat kaum heute und kein morgen.[12]

____________________

Literatur

  • The Public Historian (published for the National Council for Public History), University of Califonia Press, ISSN 0272-3433.
  • Popp, Susanne u.a. (Hrsg.): Zeitgeschichte – Medien – Historische Bildung. Göttingen 2010 (Beihefte zur Zeitschrift für Geschichtsdidaktik, 2).
  • Zürndorf, Irmgard: Zeitgeschichte und Public History, Version: 1.0, vgl. Docupedia-Zeitgeschichte, 11.02.2010, http://docupedia.de/zg/Public_History (Letzter Zugriff 22.1.2015)

Webressourcen

_________________

[1] Siehe Rüsen, Jörn: Lebendige Geschichte. Göttingen 1989. / Hardtwig, Wolfgang: Geschichtskultur und Wissenschaft. München 1990.
[2] Nolte, Paul: Öffentliche Geschichte. Die neue Nähe von Fachwissenschaft, Massenmedien und Publikum: Ursachen, Chancen und Grenzen. In: Barricelli, Michele / Hornig, Julia (Hrsg.): Aufklärung, Bildung, «Histotainment»? Zeitgeschichte in Unterricht und Gesellschaft heute. Frankfurt/M. 2008, S. 131-146, hier v.a. S. 143.
[3] Bis hin zur sehr konsequenten Unterscheidung mehrerer Zeitgeschichten bei Hockerts, Hans-Günther: Zugänge zur Zeitgeschichte. Primärerfahrung, Erinnerungskultur, Geschichtswissenschaft. In: APuZ (2001) B28, S. 15-30.
[4] In einer Formulierung von Hans Rothfels (1952), der in seinem klassisch gewordenen Aufsatz in dieser Sache allerdings bekanntermaßen unentschieden argumentiert.
[5] Assmann, Jan: Das kulturelle Gedächtnis. Schrift, Erinnerung und politische Identität in frühen Hochkulturen. München 1992, S. 48-56, im Anschluss an Vansina, Jan: Oral Tradition as History. Nairobi 1985.
[6] Es ist deshalb nur folgerichtig, dass insbesondere in Deutschland das Konzept Erinnerungskultur sehr häufig verwendet wird, stellt sie hier doch als negativer Bezug auf den Nationalsozialismus einen wichtigen Teil der Staatsräson dar. Deshalb besitzt der Übergang in eine andere Form der Sinnstiftungsproduktion viele politische und didaktische Implikationen. Siehe Knigge, Volkhard: Abschied von der Erinnerung. Anmerkungen zum notwendigen Wandel der Gedenkkultur in Deutschland. In: ders./Frei, Norbert (Hrsg.): Verbrechen erinnern. Die Auseinandersetzung mit Holocaust und Völkermord. München 2002, 423-440.
[7] Korte, Barbara / Paletschek, Sylvia: Geschichte in populären Medien und Genres: Vom Historischen Roman zum Computerspiel. In: dies. (Hrsg.): History Goes Pop. Zur Repräsentation von Geschichte in populären Medien und Genres. Bielefeld 2009, S. 9-60, hier S. 11, FN 6.
[8] Siehe Cornelißen, Christoph: Was heißt Erinnerungskultur? Begriff – Methoden – Perspektiven. In: GWU 54 (2003), 548-563. / Demantowsky, Marko: Geschichtskultur und Erinnerungskultur – zwei Konzeptionen des einen Gegenstandes. In: GPD 33 (2005) 1/2, S. 11-20 (online: https://www.academia.edu/4714387/Geschichtskultur_und_Erinnerungskultur._Zwei_Konzeptionen_des_einen_Gegenstandes_2005_, zuletzt am 22.1.15). Siehe u.a. auch die Beiträge von Wolfgang Hasberg (2004/2006) und Elisabeth Erdmann (2007).
[9] Grever, Maria: Fear of Plurality. Historical Culture and Historiographical Canonization in Western Europe. In: Epple, Angelika / Schaser, Angelika (eds.): Gendering Historiography: Beyond National Canons. Frankfurt/M., New York 2009, S. 45-62, hier S. 54f.
[10] Jordanova, Ludmilla: History in Practice. London / New York 2000, S. 149 (vielen Dank an Alix Green für den Literaturhinweis!).
[11] Man beachte hier beispielhaft nur die Projekte und Erfolge der International Federation for Public History (IFPH) (URL: http://ifph.hypotheses.org, Letzter Zugriff 22.1.15) oder des US-amerikanischen National Council for Public History (NCPH) (URL: http://ncph.org, Letzter Zugriff 22.1.15). Ein frühe Bestandaufnahme bei Simone Rauthe: Public History in den USA und der Bundesrepublik Deutschland. Essen 2001. Siehe auch Bösch/Goschler mit einem spezifischen Untersuchungshorizont Bösch, Frank/ Goschler, Constantin (eds.): Public History. Öffentliche Darstellungen des Nationalsozialismus jenseits der Geschichtswissenschaft. Frankfurt/M. 2009. Siehe schließlich auch die jüngste Gründung einer AG Angewandte Geschichte im VHD (http://www.historikerverband.de/arbeitsgruppen/ag-angewandte-geschichte.html).
[12] Hoffmann, Moritz: Geschichte braucht Öffentlichkeit. Vom Nutzen einer digitalen Public History. In: resonanzboden. Der Blog der Ullstein Buchverlage v. 14.01.2015, URL: http://www.resonanzboden.com/satzbaustelle/geschichte-braucht-oeffentlichkeit-vom-nutzen-einer-digitalen-public-history/ (Letzter Zugriff 22.1.15)

 

____________________

Abbildungsnachweis
Arne Eickenberg (2007): Visualisierung einer mêchanê, wie sie im Theater des antiken Griechenlands zur Anwendung gelangte, http://en.citizendium.org/wiki/File:Mechane_GreekTheater.jpg (Letzter Zugriff 21.1.2015).

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Demantowsky, Marko: “Public History” – Aufhebung einer deutschsprachigen Debatte? In: Public History Weekly 3 (2015) 3, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-3292.

Copyright (c) 2015 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

The post “Public History” – Sublation of a German Debate? appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/3-2015-2/public-history-sublation-german-debate/

Weiterlesen

Summer Break

 

Editorial break, we are in the summer holidays … We wish all our readers a great time, lots of rest and relaxation.

We restart with a new issue on Thursday, September 1st. Although the comment box of the posts remains open all the time, but the comments are edited & approved only after August 27th. We ask for your understanding.

Dear Readers, stay true to our PHW journal, we look forward to your posts and comments!

 



[...]

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/4-2016-27/summer-break-sommerpause/

Weiterlesen

Whitsun Break | Pfingstpause

 

Wegen des Pfingstfestes am vergangenen Wochenende erscheint in dieser Woche kein neuer Initialbeitrag. Die Kommentarfunktion bleibt aktiviert. | Because of Pentecost last weekend appears no new initial contribution today. The comment windows remain activated.

 

 

Abbildungsnachweis
Fresko Heiliger Geist (Amalfi, Basilica San Francesco) © Paul-Georg Meister / pixelio.de



[...]

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/3-2015-18/whitsun-break-pfingstpause/

Weiterlesen

Vom Jubiläum zur Jubiläumitis

 

Jubiläen, Jahrestage, Gedenktage, Feiertage usw. Der Zufall des Kalenders und die ihn bestimmenden astronomischen Konstellationen definieren zunehmend und heute fast schon ausschließlich, wann sich unser Geschichtsbewusstsein womit beschäftigt. Wenn unsere aktuelle Geschichtskultur – unsere tägliche Praxis der öffentlichen Selbstverständigung, Traditionsversicherung und Identitätsstiftung – wirklich derart dominant kalendergetrieben sein sollte, was bedeutet das für die Akteure der historisch-politischen Bildung?

 

Kampf um den Kuchen

Wir befinden uns im Jahr des 1.-Weltkrieg-Hypes. Der 100. Jahrestag. Mit langem Anlauf haben HistorikerInnen und ihre Verlage teils bewunderungswürdige Buchprojekte lanciert, Museen ihre Sonderausstellungen geplant, Gedenkstätten ihre Objekte herausgeputzt, Buchläden ihre Schaufenster und Kassenstapel neu sortiert, Fernsehen und Radio ihre Geschichtsredaktionen auf die Spur gebracht, Magazine Sonderhefte geplant, PrintjournalistInnen ihre Federn gespitzt. Vom Aufmerksamkeitskuchen wollen sehr viele ein möglichst großes Stück auf ihren Teller. Die deutsche Bundesregierung ist schon Mitte des vergangenen Jahres hart dafür kritisiert worden, dass sie – anders als einige Nachbarregierungen – noch kein offizielles regierungsamtliches Gedenkkonzept vorzulegen hatte.1 Als ob es für die Regierung eines der großen Staaten Europas in der Staatsschuldenkrise nichts Dringenderes zu tun gegeben hätte und als ob die deutschen Parteien mitten im Bundestagswahlkampf die Kraft für ein überparteiliches Geschichtskulturkonzept hätten aufbringen können. Dieser Tage hat die Bundesregierung mit einem Konzept nachgezogen.2 Soll man jetzt aufatmen?

Nichts Neues?

Erinnert sich noch jemand der jüngst vergangenen Hypes? – 2013: der 200. Jahrestag der Leipziger Völkerschlacht und der 75. Jahrestag der Novemberpogrome, 2012: 70. Jahrestag der Wannseekonferenz, 2011: 50 Jahre Mauerbau, 2010: 20 Jahre Deutsche Einheit … die Liste ließe sich lange fortsetzen, und jeder könnte weitere geschichtskulturelle Hypes hinzufügen. – Ist es nur die kapitalistische Aufmerksamkeitsökonomie unserer Zeit, rastlos angetrieben durch die nimmersatten Informationstechnologien, die uns zu Hörigen des Kalenderzufalls macht? Gewiss nicht zuletzt, ja. Aber diese Girlande ritualisierten Gedenkens bedient sich anscheinend auch der menschlichen Wahrnehmung und älterer Bedürfnisse der biografischen Ordnung. Jubiläen erscheinen uns z.B. nicht als menschengemacht, sondern als natürliche Dinge.3 Die Gegenständlichkeit des Kalenders verstärkt diese Täuschung. Eine klassische Entfremdung: Die Wahrnehmung bietet uns Selbstgemachtes als Fremd-Objektives. In dieser Weltwahrnehmung hat sich eine formale Begründungsanalogie privater und öffentlicher Sonder-Feiern (fröhlicher wie trauriger) Geltung verschafft – bei diesen ist es „das Runde“ einer zeitlichen Differenz, das ins Eckige eines Mindestabstands kommt. Ob solche Konstellationen privat schon immer gefeiert wurden? Eher nicht. Anthropologisch eingewurzelt sind rituelle Jahresfeiern, die sich am Fruchtbarkeitszyklus orientieren, die christlich-kirchlichen sind davon abgeleitet. Wir feiern sie alljährlich privat noch heute. Öffentlich geht dagegen die neuartige, nicht mehr organische Feierbegründung auf die breite Vorbildwirkung sächsischer Reformationsjubiläen in der Zeit großer politischer Bedrängung zurück.4 Sie knüpft an die „Erfindung“ des Jubiläums durch Papst Bonifaz VIII. (1300) an, der den Anlass aus seinem alttestamentlichen Kontext des Sabbatjahres löste (Lev 25, 8-55) und der Funktion einer kulturell-politischen Identitätsstiftung zugänglich machte.5 Diese zyklischen, aber eben nicht-annualen Sonderfeiern – die „Jubiläen“ – leben von einer doppelten Anmutung von Natürlichkeit und sind doch eine Institution spezifisch abendländischer Moderne, die von Anfang an historisch-politischen Zwecken diente und von Anfang an auch ein Einfallstor zur Kommerzialisierung der Geschichtskultur war.

Wie geht man damit um?

Die Kulturwissenschaften haben sich vor 10-15 Jahren intensiv bemüht, die Institution des „Jubiläums“ aufzuklären, ohne dass allerdings seitdem zu erkennen gewesen wäre, dass diese Forschungen in der eigenen Zunft eine läuternde Wirkung gehabt hätten. Die vielen stillen KärnerInnen im Weinberg des Herrn gehen ihrer Arbeit nach, des Jubiläumszirkus’ Erregungsschleifen bedienen sich Wenige virtuos und in der Sache auch exzellent, der Rest staunt. Die Akteure der historischen Bildung hecheln oftmals hinterher. Denn was auch sonst? Heutige Lernende leben in einer Welt ständig neuer Jubiläumskampagnen, sie haben Fragen dazu (oder sollten sie zumindest haben). Eine Politik- und Geschichtsdidaktik, die diese Jubiläumszyklik ihrer geschichtskulturellen Lebenswelt ignorierte, wäre de facto lebensfremd und lernfeindlich. Vielleicht ist es so, dass wir uns in Unterricht und Hochschullehre sogar viel intensiver mit dem gesellschaftlichen Phänomen „Jubiläum“ auseinandersetzen sollten – und zwar kritisch-analytisch. Etwas ironisierend könnte man von einer nötigen „Jubiläums-Kompetenz“ sprechen: Diese haben alle Heranwachsenden nötig.

“Jubiläums-Kompetenz” – schon alles?

Nein. Es geht um mehr. Die Tagesordnung unserer kulturellen Selbstverständigung und Identitätsdebatte sollten wir uns nicht vom Kalender und seinen interessierten AusbeuterInnen diktieren lassen. Und wenn die kapitalistische Aufmerksamkeitsökonomie dank ihrer massenmedialen Verstärker in ihrer sachfremden Dynamik wirksam geworden ist und das öffentliche Bewusstsein thematisch zu bestimmen vermag, dann sollten Intellektuelle diese Dynamik durchschaubar machen, kritisieren und eigene begründete Inhalte zu setzen versuchen: Jubiläumitis braucht Therapie. Keinesfalls sollten sie aber eine sachfremde, im Kern ökonomische Dynamik befeuern. Agenda Setting ist ein Königsrecht, wir sollten es nicht einfach aufgeben.

 

 

Literatur

  • Brix, Emil / Stekl, Hannes (Hrsg.): Der Kampf um das Gedächtnis. Öffentliche Gedenktage in Mitteleuropa, Köln u.a. 1997.
  • Müller, Winfried (Hrsg.): Das historische Jubiläum. Genese, Ordnungsleistung und Inszenierungsgeschichte eines institutionellen Mechanismus, Münster 2004.
  • Münch, Paul (Hrsg.): Jubiläum, Jubiläum … Zur Geschichte öffentlicher und privater Erinnerung, Essen 2005.

Externe Links

 


Abbildungsnachweis
Auslage einer Basler Buchhandlung im März 2014 © M. Demantowsky

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Demantowsky, Marko: Vom Jubiläum zur Jubiläumitis. In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 11, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-1682.

Copyright (c) 2014 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: julia.schreiner (at) degruyter.com.

The post Vom Jubiläum zur Jubiläumitis appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/2-2014-11/vom-jubilaeum-zur-jubilaeumitis/

Weiterlesen

Basler Fasnachtspause

 

Was dem einen sein Fasching ist dem anderen seine Fasnacht. Die Basler Fasnacht folgt dem alten Termin und beginnt eine Woche nach dem rheinischen Fasching und Karneval. Die Redaktion von Public History Weekly macht wie alle Basler eine Pause. Wir starten neu mit der Redaktionsarbeit am Montag, den 17. März 2014. Bis dahin bleiben die Kommentarfenster der Beiträge geschlossen. Wir freuen uns auf Ihre Beiträge und Kommentare nach der Fasnachtspause!

What to some is a “Carnival” is a “Fasnacht” to others. The “Basler Fasnacht” follows the old calendar and begins one week after the Rhenish Carnival. The editors of Public History Weekly take a break - like all (or most) Basel inhabitants. We resume the editorial work on Monday, the 17th January 2014. Until then, the comment function for postings is shut down. We look forward to your posts and comments after the “Fasnacht” break!

 

Abbildungsnachweis
© Markus Walti / pixelio.de

The post Basler Fasnachtspause appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/2-2014-10/fasnachtspause/

Weiterlesen

Frohe Weihnachten & Merry Christmas

 

Wir wünschen allen unseren LeserInnen ein frohes und besinnliches Weihnachtsfest und ein gutes neues Jahr 2014. Public History Weekly macht ebenfalls eine Pause. Wir starten neu mit der Redaktionsarbeit am Montag, den 6. Januar 2014. Bis dahin bleiben die Kommentarfenster der Beiträge geschlossen. Wir freuen uns auf Ihre Beiträge und Kommentare 2014!

 

We wish all our readers a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year 2014. Public History Weekly is also taking a break. We restart with the editorial work on Monday, the 6th January 2014. Until then, the comment window of the contributions remain closed. We look forward to your posts and comments in 2014!

 

 

 

Abbildungsnachweis
© LordSilver/ Pixelio.de

The post Frohe Weihnachten & Merry Christmas appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/1-2013-17/frohe-weihnachten-merry-christmas/

Weiterlesen

Praxis vs. Theorie und Rüsens neue Historik

 

„Theorie“ ist ein geschichtsdidaktisches Zauberwort zur Professionalisierungsprovokation. Die meisten Studierenden wollen sie nicht und ertragen sie nur widerwillig. Vielen praktizierenden LehrerInnen aller Berufsphasen geht es ebenso, wenn sie ihnen in den seltenen Fortbildungen oder in den (nicht oft gelesenen) geschichtsdidaktischen Texten begegnet.

 

Differenz von Erwartung und Angebot

Studierende und LehrerInnen erwarten von GeschichtsdidaktikerInnen unmittelbare Unterstützung in ihrer täglichen Berufspraxis; und sie tun es gestützt auf eigene Erfahrungen als SchülerInnen, PraktikantInnen oder als beanspruchte Lehrpersonen (mehr oder minder berechtigt) auf eine bestimmte Weise. Das war so in den drei deutschen Ländern, in denen ich als Geschichtsdidaktiker tätig war und das ist so in den vier Schweizer Kantonen, in denen ich es jetzt bin. Diese variierende Differenz zwischen theoriegestütztem geschichtsdidaktischem Angebot und den Erwartungen seiner Zielgruppe sind also offenbar kein regionales, nationales oder gar persönliches Problem. Dass die Didaktik der Geschichte indes sehr viel unternimmt, um vielleicht nicht generell diesen Erwartungen, aber doch gewiss ihrer gesellschaftlichen Verantwortung gerecht zu werden, das hat Michele Barricelli kürzlich dargestellt.

Rüsens Geschichtstheorie

Ich meine allerdings, dass man die Theoriebedürftigkeit der LehrerInnen-„Ausbildung“ und der alltäglichen geschichtsunterrichtlichen Praxis ergänzend auch etwas offensiver diskutieren könnte. Den Anlass dafür bietet das kürzliche Erscheinen eines bedeutsamen Buches, nämlich Jörn Rüsens neuer Historik.1 Dieses Buch ist die späte Summe der vielen originellen geschichtstheoretischen Texte, die Rüsen seit Ende der 1960er Jahre publiziert hat. Darin hat Rüsen viele Ansätze geschichtstheoretischen Denkens neu zusammengedacht und verdichtet. Rüsens Geschichtstheorie ist aber auch deshalb für die historisch-politische Bildung relevant, weil der Autor den Aspekt der lebensweltlichen Verwurzelung jedes historischen Denkens durchgehend und konsequent mitbedacht2 und weil er weiterhin die Didaktik der Geschichte immer schon als eine Dimension der Geschichtswissenschaft reflektiert hat – nämlich als eine praktisch wirksame, sich gesellschaftlich intentional artikulierende Form der Geschichtswissenschaft.3 Geschichtsdidaktik ist eine Praxis der Geschichtswissenschaft, insofern diese sich um Bildung bemüht. Gleichzeitig ist sie aber auch eine Institution, eine eigenständige Teildisziplin mit einem spezifischen Rekrutierungs- und Reputationsapparat – das führt manchmal zu Verwechselungen und falschen Abgrenzungen.

Vom Unterschied zwischen Alltagstheorien …

Es ist eigentlich sehr leicht zu erklären, warum es in der LehrerInnenausbildung nicht nur nicht ohne „Theorie“, sondern auch nur mit vergleichsweise sehr viel „Theorie“ geht, und warum das Gegeneinanderausspielen von „Theorie“ und „Praxis“ in seiner entlastenden Wirkung zwar subjektiv gut erklärbar sein mag, in der Sache aber völlig inadäquat ist. „Theorie“ ist dem Worte nach erst einmal nichts anderes als „Welt-Anschauung“, es ist mehr oder minder bewusste, mehr oder minder gut begründete kontemplative Reflexion von Erfahrung. Diese Reflexion geschieht in der Regel entweder rein subjektiv und führt zu individuellen Alltagstheorien, oder sie wird gar nicht selbst geleistet und als Traditionsprodukt von Autoritäten unbesehen übernommen. Solche tradierten Theorien bilden die Substanz der institutionellen Landschaft, in die wir hineinsozialisiert werden. Wir funktionieren in dieser Landschaft normalerweise ganz gut. Alle Arten von Alltagstheorien sind bereichsbezogen; jeder Studierende hat sie von seinem zukünftigen Beruf, jede Lehrperson egal welcher Berufsphase hat sie in individueller Ausformung vom eigenen aktuellen Berufsfeld („Beliefs“).4

… und wissenschaftlichen Theorien

Was man dagegen gemeinhin „Theorie“ nennt, das sind aufs Ganze gesehen sehr seltene Sonderfälle, nämlich solche Welt-Anschauungen, die sich um explizite Begründung, Traditionskritik, Kontextualisierung und überprüfbare empirische Rückbindung an die Welt bemühen: wissenschaftliche Theorien. Sie sind individuelle Erscheinung, insofern aus ihnen jeweils die Leistung einer TheoretikerIn spricht. Sie sind aber immer auch kollektive Erscheinungen, weil sie Resultate von Bildung, von Diskussion und offenen Kontroversen darstellen. All das unterscheidet sie von Alltagstheorien. Ihr kritisches Verständnis macht den Unterschied zwischen dem Experten und dem Dilettanten. Ein Experte ist als Mensch selbstverständlich weiterhin ein Füllhorn diverser Alltagstheorien, auf seinem Spezialgebiet sollte er diese Alltagstheorien jedoch mit wissenschaftlichen ins Verhältnis gebracht und eine kritische Balance zwischen ihnen gefunden haben. Theoria Cum Praxi (Leibniz) ist also keine hehre Norm, sondern eine schlichte Tatsache unserer alltäglichen Lebensführung. Es kommt bei jeder Qualifikation, auch der beruflichen, auf die Qualität der Theorien an, die in den Prozessen der Lebensbewältigung zur Verfügung stehen, nicht auf das Ob oder Ob-Nicht.5

Studium oder Ausbildung?

LehrerInnen-„Ausbildung“ ist ein irreführender Begriff, und insofern schon ein Fehlkonzept einer Welt-Anschauung. Es geht nicht um eine Berufs-„Ausbildung“ wie die einer BäckerIn oder einer FachverkäuferIn – bei allem Respekt vor diesen Berufen und den darin tätigen SpezialistInnen. Vielmehr geht es um ein wissenschaftliches Studium, das nicht vorwiegend zur Kenntnis und Beherrschung eines Regelkorpus führen soll, sondern zur autonomen (also selbst-gesetzgebenden), anpassungsfähigen, wissenschaftlich informierten Ausübung eines Lehramtes – woraus sich im Übrigen auch die vergleichsweise hervorragende Entlohnung erklärt. Eine solche Berufsausübung setzt die immer wieder zu erneuernde Einsicht in psychologische, bildungswissenschaftliche und v.a. geschichtswissenschaftliche Erkenntnisse und eben auch Theorien unbedingt voraus – und das muss man gelernt haben! Praktika dienen der fallweisen Einübung relevanter Theorien und Empirien in die Situationalität des „pädagogischen Universums“. Abgeschlossen ist das Lehrerwerden mit einem solchen Studium allerdings in keiner Weise. Aus der Lehrerforschung kennen wir den langen, unsicheren und anstrengenden Weg hin zu didaktischer Routine und evtl. auch Meisterschaft.6 Das Studium soll dafür das intellektuelle, also theoretische Rüstzeug bieten, der Prozess des Lehrerwerdens selber dauert Jahrzehnte. Und es gibt auf diesem steinigen Weg keine Abkürzung.

Für Rüsen sind geschichtsbezogene Theorien gar nicht denkbar ohne lebensweltliche Anstiftung, Verankerung und Rückwirkung.7 Er führt die Praxis des Umgangs mit Theorie vor, theoretisch. Die gewiss anstrengende Lektüre und Diskussion von Rüsens Historik könnte für jeden Studierenden eine Etappe auf dem Weg des Lehrerwerdens sein, an die man sich nach vielen Jahren Berufspraxis dankbar erinnern wird. Versprochen.

 

Literatur

  • Rüsen, Jörn: Historik und Didaktik. Ort und Funktion der Geschichtstheorie im Zusammenhang von Geschichtsforschung und historischer Bildung. In: Kosthorst, Erich (Hg.): Geschichtswissenschaft. Didaktik – Forschung – Theorie. Göttingen 1977, S. 48-64.
  • Rüsen, Jörn: Grundzüge einer Historik, 3 Bde., Göttingen 1983-1989.
  • Rüsen, Jörn: Historik. Theorie der Geschichtswissenschaft. Köln u.a. 2013.

Externe Links

 

Abbildungsnachweise
Buchcover von Rüsen, Jörn: Historik, Köln 2013 © Böhlau-Verlag Köln.

Hintergrundbild: © knipseline  / pixelio.de

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Demantowsky, Marko: Praxis vs. Theorie und Rüsens neue Historik. In: Public History Weekly 1 (2013) 14, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2013-889.

Copyright (c) 2013 by Oldenbourg Verlag and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: julia.schreiner (at) degruyter.com.

The post Praxis vs. Theorie und Rüsens neue Historik appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/1-2013-14/praxis-vs-theorie-und-ruesens-neue-historik/

Weiterlesen

Editorial. Yet Another Journal?

 

There is a rich and diverse range of German-speaking journals in the field of history and civics education. The usual forms of assuring formalised scientific quality are well-established. Now it may seem to the observer that there is no lack of publication opportunities, but rather of texts worth reading and able to stimulate discussion. The excessive demand for materials by editorial boards is distinctly augmented by the plethora of themed volumes appearing on all fronts. However, this large-scale production of texts also raises the question of who is supposed to read all these publications attentively. Seemingly, therefore, it would not be feasible to launch yet another journal, only to compete against the many established ones already available.

 

Three Problems: Publication Frequency, Hermeticism, Marginality

Closer scrutiny reveals that the journal landscape in the field of history and civics education is fraught with characteristic problems and shortcomings. Journal issues are published at long intervals and production times are lengthy (also due to elaborate quality-assurance processes). As a result, it is very difficult to initiate a lively and controversial discussion on the key problems of history and civics education via these journals.  The controversies so very essential for this field of inquiry in particular take place on the margins of conferences. As a rule, moreover, contentious topics and issues remain undocumented and hence fail to develop their potential for wider debate. The contributions to conventional journals lead a somewhat monadic existence. Besides, the skirmishes routinely waged in the footnotes are matters of yesterday. Usually appearing a great deal later, a published response to any such monad is equally monadic. Contributions to the established journals are largely hermetic, sometimes even esoteric. This is due not only to their sophisticated scientific language, but also to the small print run and small circulation range of such journals. Generally, not more than one hundred copies of any given issue are sold, most of which end up filling library shelves. History didacticians thus write mostly for themselves, and hence fail to reach not only their key target audience—teachers—but also a wider public interested in history and civics education. This problem is bound up with a further difficulty: among the general public and its media there are time and again conflicts directly concerning the field of history and civics education. Because history didacticians lead pretty much sheltered existences, forming a public of their own, they are not recognised as experts by journalists covering the field. As a result, the specific rationality potentials developed meanwhile by history didactics over a period of scientific research spanning 60 years remain untapped.

A Paradoxical Solution

What to do? Establish a new journal after all? If so, then this needs to be a journal that provides a solution to the problems commonly besetting journals in the field of historico-political education (publication frequency, hermeticism, and marginality). Over the past months, we have developed a format that enables a lively, almost real-time scientific exchange and renders effective and visible the rationality potentials of the didactics of history and civics education for a wider public and in a shape and form compatible with present-day mass-media formats. Beyond the scientific community mentioned above, the target audiences envisaged for this new journal are above all teachers, journalists, and interested members of the general public, that is to say, groups which thus far have had no access to the ongoing debates on the didactics of history and civics education and that were hardly within reach even for didacticians publishing in established journals.

History Didactics 2.0

Attaining this objective calls for an online medium, because nowadays those seeking information, not least also teachers, do so primarily online. A further requirement is an interactive but low-threshold application so as to involve those colleagues who are not digital natives in lively, non-verbal discourses. At the same time, the planned format strengthens the online presence of history and political education didacticians as well as promotes the necessary adjustment to the digital transformation of everyday life among our students, history teachers, and published opinion. Thus, this online format could lead to satisfying the desiderata for wider and more diversified participation in the current debates on didactics—since it greatly lowers the participation threshold. Nurturing these debates while also continually satisfying professional curiosity will involve harnessing an element of surprise and predictability. While recognised experts with proven research records should be expected to voice their opinions on a regular basis, the contents of their contributions should not be predictable. Accordingly, 12 professors from Austria, Switzerland, and Germany will support the new venture as a team of regular contributors. These authors have been granted absolute freedom to what write what they like within our thematic scope. Every Thursday at 8 a.m. will see the publication of a new and hopefully easily readable and stimulating initial contribution. Comments are welcome on all published contributions—and should not exceed the length of the initial texts.  The outcome will be a blog journal, an entirely new publication format within the landscape of history didactics journals. This format, we believe, may suitably complement existing journals in the field.

Postscriptum

- Some may wonder why our blog journal’s online presence and title are in English. Believe it or not, this is by no means a matter of newfangled self-importance but a decision taken with a view to—from 2014—expanding our team of (German-speaking) regular contributors to English-speaking colleagues and to publishing the entire journal in German and English. Prospective bilingual publication reflects our aim to promote debate and exchange beyond any self-limiting perspective. As such this initial step graphically anticipates the next stage of development.

- The envisaged format is new—also for our contributors. Writing History Didactics 2.0 must be learned anew. So please bear with us during the first couple of months.

- “Public History” is a wide field. Our blog journal seeks to bring into view individual and specifically didactic perspectives. It lays no claim whatsoever to being exclusive, nor to possessing the truth, nor indeed to prescribing the thematic agenda. Fear not, we are not aspiring to “Imperial Overstretch.”

 

Image credit 
(c) Photograph by Jens Märker / Pixelio

Translation (from German)
by Kyburz&Peck, English Language Projects (www.englishprojects.ch)

Recommended Citation
Demantowsky, Marko: Editorial. Yet another journal? In: Public History Weekly 1 (2013) 1, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2013-599.

Copyright (c) 2013 by Oldenbourg Verlag and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: julia.schreiner (at) degruyter.com.

The post Editorial. Yet Another Journal? appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/1-2013-1/editorial/

Weiterlesen

Editorial. Noch eine neue Zeitschrift?

 

Die deutschsprachige Zeitschriftenlandschaft ist auf dem Feld der historisch-politischen Bildung reich und vielfältig. Die üblichen Formen der formalisierten wissenschaftlichen Qualitätssicherung sind etabliert. Dem Beobachtenden mag es manchmal scheinen, dass es nicht an Publikationsgelegenheiten mangelt, sondern an lesenswerten und diskussionsanregenden Texten. Dieses Phänomen des redaktionellen Nachfrageüberhangs auf dem Publikationsmarkt wird durch die vielen themenspezifischen Sammelbände, die allenthalben erscheinen, noch deutlich verstärkt. Diese große Textproduktion lässt aber auch die Frage aufkommen, wer das alles noch aufmerksam studieren soll? Es kann deshalb kein sinnvolles Projekt sein, den vielen etablierten Zeitschriften ein weiteres konkurrierendes Organ hinzuzufügen.

 

Drei Probleme: Erscheinungsfrequenz, Hermetik, Randständigkeit

Wenn man genauer hinsieht, kann man feststellen, dass diese Zeitschriftenlandschaft mit charakteristischen Problemen und Defiziten behaftet ist. Die einzelnen Blätter erscheinen in langer Frequenz und mit langer Produktionsdauer (auch wegen der aufwändigen kollektiven Qualitätssicherungen). Dies führt dazu, dass ein lebendiger und kontroverser Austausch über zentrale Probleme der historisch-politischen Bildung im Medium dieser Zeitschriften nur sehr schwer ins Laufen kommt. Solche besonders für diesen Themenbereich so essentiellen Kontroversen finden auf und am Rande von Tagungen statt, werden in der Regel nicht dokumentiert und entwickeln deshalb nicht ihr öffentliches Potenzial. In den gängigen Zeitschriften stehen die einzelnen Beiträge gleichsam als Monaden, und die üblichen Fußnotenscharmützel sind notgedrungen gestrig. Eine publizierte Reaktion auf eine solche Monade ist es im Augenblick ihres viel späteren Erscheinens auch.
Das Schreiben in den etablierten Zeitschriften trägt weitgehend hermetischen, manchmal esoterischen Charakter. Das liegt nicht nur an einer elaborierten Wissenschaftssprache, sondern auch an der geringen Auflagenstärke und Reichweite dieser Zeitschriften. In der Regel werden nicht mehr als wenige hundert Exemplare verkauft, von denen die meisten wiederum in die Bibliotheken wandern und dort die Regale füllen. Die GeschichtsdidaktikerInnen schreiben also weitestgehend nur für sich. Ihre entscheidende Zielgruppe, die LehrerInnen, aber auch eine interessierte Öffentlichkeit erreichen sie kaum.
Damit verbunden ist noch ein weiteres Problem: In der Öffentlichkeit und ihren Medien gibt es immer wieder Konflikte, die das Feld der historisch-politischen Bildung direkt betreffen. Da die GeschichtsdidaktikerInnen sich in einer abgeschirmten Öffentlichkeit bewegen, werden sie von den jeweils verantwortlichen JournalistInnen als ExpertInnen nicht wahrgenommen. Dadurch bleiben die spezifischen Rationalitätspotentiale unausgeschöpft, die von der Geschichtsdidaktik in ihrer mittlerweile 60jährigen wissenschaftlichen Entwicklung erarbeitet worden sind.

Eine paradoxe Lösung

Was tun? Doch eine neue Zeitschrift gründen. Es sollte allerdings eine Zeitschrift sein, die für die Probleme der Frequenz, der Hermetik und der Randständigkeit einen Lösungsansatz bietet. In den vergangenen Monaten ist in diesem Sinne ein Format entwickelt worden, das lebendigen, nahezu echtzeitigen wissenschaftlichen Austausch ermöglicht und das die Rationalitätspotentiale der Didaktiken der Geschichte und Politik effektiv öffentlich und massenmedial kompatibel sichtbar macht. Als Zielgruppen werden über den vorgenannten wissenschaftlichen Kreis hinaus auch und besonders die LehrerInnen, die JounalistInnen und ganz allgemein eine interessierte Öffentlichkeit betrachtet. Das sind Gruppen, die bis anhin keinen Zugang zur Diskussion in den Didaktiken der Geschichte und Politik hatten und umgedreht für publizierende DidaktikerInnen kaum erreichbar waren.

Geschichtsdidaktik 2.0

Um diesen Zweck zu erreichen, braucht man ein Online-Medium, weil sich jeder Interessierte, nicht zuletzt auch die LehrerInnen, heutzutage primär online informiert. Darüber hinaus benötigt man ein interaktives, aber gleichwohl technisch niedrigschwelliges Format, um auch nicht-netzaffine Kolleginnen und Kollegen in lebendige nicht-mündliche Diskurse einzubinden. Gleichzeitig stärkt das geplante Format die Präsenz von Geschichts-und Politikdidaktikern im Netz und befördert dadurch die notwendige Anpassung an den sich vollziehenden digitalen Wandel der Lebenswelt unserer SchülerInnen, der Lehrkräfte in unseren Fächern und der veröffentlichten Meinung. Das könnte wünschenswerterweise dazu führen, dass sich die didaktischen Debatten in ihrer Teilnehmerschaft ausweiten und diversifizieren – weil es nur noch eine sehr niedrige Teilnahmeschwelle gibt.
Um die Debatten zu füttern und die fachliche Neugier immer wieder zu befriedigen, müssen Überraschung und Berechenbarkeit gekoppelt werden. Man muss erwarten dürfen, dass anerkannte und durch Forschung ausgewiesene ExpertInnen sich dort regelmäßig melden und deren Beiträge wiederum dürfen inhaltlich nicht vorab erwartbar sein. Dementsprechend werden 12 ProfessorInnen aus Österreich, der Schweiz und Deutschland das Journal als Stammautoren unterstützen. Diesen AutorInnen wiederum wurde im Themenspektrum der Zeitschrift absolute auktoriale Freiheit eingeräumt, sie können schreiben, worüber sie wollen. Jeden Donnerstag um 8 Uhr wird ein neuer, hoffentlich gut lesbarer und anregender Initialbeitrag erscheinen. Kommentiert werden können alle erschienenen Beiträge – maximal in gleicher Länge wie die Initialtexte.
Das Ganze ist dann ein Blog-Journal, in dieser Form etwas ganz Neues im Spektrum geschichtsdidaktischer Zeitschriften. Vielleicht eine gute Ergänzung.

 

3 „Disclaimer“

- Man mag sich wundern, warum der Auftritt und Titel des Blog-Journals in englischer Sprache gehalten sind. Es handelt sich dabei, man mag es uns glauben, nicht um neumodische Wichtigtuerei. Vielmehr soll unser Autorenstamm ab 2014 um englischsprachige KollegInnen erweitert und das ganze Journal zweisprachig gehalten werden. Wir wollen den Austausch perspektivisch sehr gern grenzenlos ermöglichen. Es handelt sich also um die graphische Vorwegnahme des nächsten Entwicklungsschrittes.

- Dieses Format ist ein neuartiges – auch für die AutorInnen. Schreiben 2.0 will neu gelernt werden. Bitte seien Sie in den ersten Monaten nachsichtig.

- „Public History“ ist ein weites Feld. Das Blog-Journal möchte einzelne, spezifisch didaktische Perspektiven kenntlich machen und erhebt keinerlei Anspruch auf Ausschließlichkeit, Wahrheitsbesitz und Themenmacht. Keine Angst vor dem “Imperial Overstretch”.

The post Editorial. Noch eine neue Zeitschrift? appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/1-2013-1/editorial-noch-neue-zeitschrift/

Weiterlesen