The Australian Experience: Peak Commemoration?

Australia has strongly attached its identity to its ANZAC participation in World War I. Have the citizens, after a long string of centenary years, finally reached Peak Commemoration?

The post The Australian Experience: Peak Commemoration? appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-40/anzackery/

Weiterlesen

100 Years of the “Christmas Truce”. Longing for a New Narrative

Not all is quiet on the Western Front: The annual unofficial competition for the best Christmas advert in the United Kingdom was decided as long ago as 12 November. Sainsbury’s, the British supermarket chain, stunned its…


 

English

Not all is quiet on the Western Front: The annual unofficial competition for the best Christmas advert in the United Kingdom was decided as long ago as 12 November. Sainsbury’s, the British supermarket chain, stunned its competitors and the public with an extremely professional film about the “Christmas Truce” on the Western Front in 1914.[1]

 

 

A TV advert

Its slogan: “Christmas is for sharing.” The ongoing discussion about whether advertising should be allowed to use war for its own purposes overlooks something rather important: the current search for a transnational narrative about World War One.
Duration: 3 minutes 20 seconds. High-quality. Almost real. First scene: trenches on the Western Front. Snowflakes. Insert: “Christmas Eve 1914.” A young British soldier is looking at a cookie, his meal for Christmas Eve, surrounded by the noise of artillery fire and detonating grenades. Mail from home arrives, containing the picture of a young woman, a letter, and a bar of chocolate. Suddenly the noise of war stops. Blowing across no man’s land the Brits can hear the Germans singing “Silent night, Holy night.” Cut. Long shot to the snow-clad no man’s land. Cut. German trench with singing soldiers. Cut. British trench. Soldiers singing “Silent night.” Cut. Cut. Cut. German and British soldiers are singing louder and louder. Together: “Silent night, Holy night.” Cut. – This is the beginning of the current Christmas advert of the British supermarket chain Sainsbury’s. It then shows British and German soldiers climbing out of their trenches, meeting in no man’s land, exchanging small goods, taking photographs and, of course, playing soccer. Peace ends suddenly when artillery fire resumes. The war is back. Telling this story, the film refers back to a historic event known in the United Kingdom as “Christmas Truce” and “Weihnachtsfrieden” in Germany.

Being disrespectful?

True, Sainsbury’s Christmas advert plays on emotion. Yet the same holds true for John Lewis, another British department store, and also for the German supermarket chain Edeka.[2] Nevertheless, the public debate on this film is highly controversial. Journalist Ally Fogg writes in the Guardian: “Sainsbury’s Christmas ad is a dangerous and disrespectful masterpiece. In making the First World War beautiful to flog groceries the film-makers have disrespected the millions who suffered in the trenches.”[3] Sainsbury’s is criticized for doing nothing but exploiting an emotional event of the First World War solely for profit. The supermarket chain counted on the fact that public attention was guaranteed on the 100th anniversary. Therefore, the advertisement was disrespectful against the soldiers who lost their lives. Contrary to the John Lewis Christmas advert, with its soft toy penguin that, of course, is offered for sale in the department stores, Sainsbury’s sells the chocolate from Jim’s parcel— produced in Ypern (!), a town in Flanders—for only £1. In addition, the money will be given to The Royal British Legion, the British welfare organization for war veterans—quite a clever way of avoiding critical remarks in the first place!

As accurate as possible…

The Royal British Legion considers the commercial to be absolutely unproblematic; there is no mention whatsoever of disrespectfulness. Quite on the contrary, the Legion is full of praise: “[…] the advert is a creative interpretation of the moment when on Christmas Day 1914, British and German Soldiers paused […]. Emphasis is placed on how close the advert is to the real historical event: “Sainsbury’s and The Royal British Legion have sought to make the portrayal of the truce as accurate as possible, basing it on original reports and letters, as well as working with historians throughout the development and production process.”[4] This can also be seen in two accompanying short films, a making-of and a short documentary.[5] Indeed, the Sainsbury commercial is based on events documented in historical sources dating from 1914, albeit in an extremely abbreviated version: The carol-singing, the “Barber Shop” in no man’s land, the soccer match, the snapshots, playing cards, and the bartering – but whereas these events all actually occurred in 1914, they did not take place at one single location.[6] The TV commercial does not show the historical event (something it cannot show), but rather how it can be told in the UK in 2014.

Narrative traditions

While using the film for advertising purposes is debated in the press, the story itself is uncontroversial. Forgotten in Germany until ten years ago, the “Christmas Truces” are common knowledge in the United Kingdom, part of the basic narratives about the First World War. Ample evidence exists in the shape of academic publications, children’s books, movies, songs, and caricatures.[7] Using the “Christmas Truces” in the context of the current remembrance hype about World War One is quite obvious and far from unique. In view of “Poppy Pizza” or the steel helmets of Belgian chocolate, the film is not the most irritating product invented by the remembrance industry in 2014.[8] In fact, the television advert follows a (narrative) tradition that has developed since the first press releases on the “Christmas Truces” in 1915. Moreover, the film draws on former visualisations of the event, such as Paul McCartney’s music video for “Pipes of Peace” (1983), or the film “Merry Christmas” (2005). Thus, neither the story, nor its narration, is the noise coming from the Western Front.

Searching for transnational narratives

Something elementary, however, is being overlooked: The Sainsbury commercial also reflects the numerous attempts to overcome traditional, and specifically national, ways of commemorating the First World War or at least to add transnational elements to such commemorations in 2014, the year of remembrance.[9] New memorials testify to the same gesture. On 6 December, politicians inaugurated a memorial created by British and German students dedicated to the “Christmas Truces” and on 11 December a corresponding UEFA memorial was unveiled.[10] The “Christmas Truces” almost immediately spring to mind as a place of remembrance in 2014 since they offer a coalescing Europe a remembrance narrative that enables all participants to remember the First World War and the soldiers in the trenches and—like in December 1914—to join hands with peaceful intentions on the former battlefields. While remembering the “Christmas Truces” this year says much about the fraternisation of 1914, present-day commemoration says even more about us and our longing for reconciling narratives.

____________________

Literature

  • Brown, Malcom/Sheaton, Shirley: Christmas Truce. The western front December 1914. London 2014 (Erstauflage: 1984).
  • Bunnenberg, Christian: Christmas Truce. Die Amateurfotos vom Weihnachtsfrieden 1914 und ihre Karriere, in: Paul, Gerhard (Hrsg.): Das Jahrhundert der Bilder. Band 1: 1900 bis 1949. Göttingen 2009, S. 156-163.
  • Weintraub, Stanley: Silent Night. The remarkable Christmas Truce of 1914. London 2001.

External links

____________________

[1] The advert by Sainsbury’s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWF2JBb1bvM was clicked more than 13,775,000 times on 15.12.2014 (last accessed 15.12.2014).
[2] The advert by John Lewis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iccscUFY860 and EDEKA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H965m0Hkk5M (last accessed 15.12.2014).
[3] http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/nov/13/sainsburys-christmas-ad-first-world-war (last accessed 15.12.2014).
[4] http://www.britishlegion.org.uk/about-us/news/remembrance/sainsburys-and-the-legion-partner-to-bring-ww1-christmas-truce-story-to-life (last accessed 15.12.2014).
[5] The Making of https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jx3pQWbysmM of the Sainsbury’s advert has been clicked more 369,000 times by 15.12.2014 and the corresponding documentary https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2s1YvnfcFVs has been clicked about 670,000 times. (last accessed 15.12.2014).
[6] Bunnenberg, Christian: Dezember 1914: Stille Nacht im Schützengraben – Die Erinnerung an die Weihnachtsfrieden in Flandern, in: Arand, Tobias (ed.): Die „Urkatastrophe“ als Erinnerung. Geschichtskultur des Ersten Weltkrieges (= Geschichtskultur und Krieg, Band 1). Münster 2006, S. 15-59. Ausführliche und quellengesättigte Darstellung der „Weihnachtsfrieden“ here: S. 26-44.
[7] Bunnenberg, Christian: Christmas Truce. Die Amateurfotos vom Weihnachtsfrieden 1914 und ihre Karriere, in: Paul, Gerhard (ed.): Das Jahrhundert der Bilder. Band 1: 1900 bis 1949. Göttingen 2009, S. 156-163, here: 162-163.
[8] Report on Poppy-Pizza: http://www.london24.com/entertainment/around-the-web/tesco_sells_special_poppy_roni_pizzas_for_remembrance_day_nobody_is_hungry_for_them_1_3842019 (last accessed 15.12.2014).
[9] Consider as well the conference “Auf dem Weg zu einer transnationalen Erinnerungskultur? Konvergenzen, Interferenzen und Differenzen der Erinnerung an den Ersten Weltkrieg im Jubiläumsjahr 2014“, that took place in October 2014 at University of Potsdam. (http://www.uni-potsdam.de/db/geschichte/getdata.php?ID=2891). A conference transcript will be published soon. (last accessed 15.12.2014).
[10] For further information on the historical monuments designed by British and German pupils see https://bid.lspb.de/portal/Index/1141780/ and UEFA http://www.tagesschau.de/ausland/weihnachtsfrieden-ploegsteert-101.html (last accessed 15.12.2014).

____________________

Image Credits
A Tweet by Sainsbury’s © Screeshot by Christian Bunnenberg

Recommended Citation
Bunnenberg, Christian: 100 years “Christmas Truce”. Longing for a New Narrative. In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 45, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-3151.

Copyright (c) 2014 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Deutsch

Aus dem Westen etwas Neues: Der jährliche inoffizielle Wettbewerb um den besten für das Weihnachtsgeschäft produzierten Werbefilm in Großbritannien ist bereits seit dem 12. November entschieden. Die britische Supermarktkette Sainsbury’s überraschte ihre Konkurrenz und die Öffentlichkeit mit einem aufwändig produzierten Film über die 1914 an der Westfront stattgefundenen “Weihnachtsfrieden”.[1]

 

Ein Werbefilm

Die Botschaft: Christmas is for sharing. Die seit November anhaltende Diskussion darüber, ob Werbung den Krieg für ihre Zwecke instrumentalisieren darf, übersieht allerdings etwas Wichtiges – die gegenwärtige Suche nach transnationalen Narrativen über den Ersten Weltkrieg.
Länge: 3 Minuten 20 Sekunden. Kinoqualität. Erste Einstellung: Schützengraben an der Westfront. Es schneit. Einblendung: “Christmas Eve 1914.” Ein junger britischer Soldat betrachtet einen Keks, die Ration für den Weihnachtstag. Im Hintergrund das Grollen der Artillerie. Granateinschläge. Dann Post aus der Heimat. Darin: Das Foto einer jungen Frau, ein Brief und eine Tafel Schokolade. Plötzlich ist der Gefechtslärm verstummt. Über das Niemandsland hinweg hören die Briten deutschen Gesang: “Stille Nacht, heilige Nacht”. Schnitt. Totale auf das verschneite Niemandsland. Schnitt. Deutscher Graben mit singenden Soldaten. Schnitt. Britischer Graben. Man singt: “Silent Night”. Schnitt. Schnitt. Schnitt. Deutsche und britische Soldaten singen lauter und lauter. Gemeinsam: “Stille Nacht, Holy Night.” Schnitt. – So beginnt der aktuelle Weihnachtswerbefilm der britischen Supermarktkette Sainsbury’s. Im weiteren Verlauf zeigt er, wie die britischen und deutschen Soldaten aus den Schützengräben klettern, sich im Niemandsland treffen, Kleinigkeiten tauschen, sich zusammen fotografieren und vor allem: Fußball spielen. Der Friede endet abrupt, als wieder Artillerie schießt. Der Krieg ist zurückgekehrt. Mit dieser Erzählung nimmt der Film inhaltlich Bezug auf ein historisches Referenzereignis, das man in Großbritannien als “Christmas Truce” und in Deutschland als “Weihnachtsfrieden” kennt.

Eine Respektlosigkeit?

Zugegeben, der Weihnachtswerbefilm von Sainsbury’s setzt auf Emotionen. Darauf setzen aber auch das Kaufhaus John Lewis und sogar die deutsche Einzelhandelskette Edeka.[2] Trotzdem wird der Film in der Öffentlichkeit kontrovers diskutiert. Der Journalist Ally Fogg schreibt im Guardian: Sainsbury’s bediene sich nur aus Profitstreben eines emotionalen Ereignisses aus dem Ersten Weltkrieg. Die Supermarktkette setze dabei auf die im Jahr des 100. Jubiläums erhöhte öffentliche Aufmerksamkeit. Aus diesem Grund sei die Werbung respektlos gegenüber den gefallenen Soldaten.[3] Im Gegensatz zu dem von John Lewis im Spot gezeigten und im Kaufhaus angebotenen Plüschpinguin ist bei Sainsbury’s aber die in Ypern (!) produzierte Schokolade aus Jims Päckchen erhältlich. Zum Preis von 1 £. Der Erlös geht an The Royal British Legion, der britischen Kriegsveteranen-Organisation – keine ungeschickte Absicherung gegen die anscheinend einkalkulierte Kritik.

So akkurat wie möglich …

The Royal British Legion sieht den Spot auch völlig unproblematisch, von Respektlosigkeit ist keine Rede. Man gibt sich voll des Lobes: “[…] the advert is a creative interpretation of the moment when on Christmas Day 1914, British and German Soldiers paused […]” Betont wird vor allem die Nähe zum historischen Referenzereignis: “Sainsbury’s and The Royal British Legion have sought to make the portrayal of the truce as accurate as possible, basing it on original reports and letters, as well as working with historians throughout the development and production process.”[4] Das äußert sich auch in den zwei zum Spot ergänzend produzierten Kurzfilmen, einem Making-Of und einer kurzen Dokumentation.[5] Und in der Tat greift der Film in Quellen von 1914 belegte Ereignisse auf, allerdings hochverdichtet: Der gemeinsame Gesang, die “Rasierstube” im Niemandsland, das Fußballspiel, die Schnappschüsse, das Karten spielen und die Tauschgeschäfte – alles das hat 1914 stattgefunden, allerdings nicht an einem Ort.[6] Der Werbefilm zeigt also weniger das historische Ereignis (das kann er auch gar nicht), sondern vielmehr wie es 2014 in Großbritannien erzählt werden kann.

Erzähltraditionen

Während die Nutzung als Werbefilm in der Presse diskutiert wird, bleibt die Darstellung an sich von Kritik unberührt. Waren die “Weihnachtfrieden” von 1914 in Deutschland bis vor zehn Jahren “vergessen”, gehören sie in Großbritannien zum festen Erinnerungsrepertoire, zu den Basisnarrativen über den Ersten Weltkrieg. Das äußert sich in wissenschaftlichen Publikationen, Kinderbüchern, Filmen, Liedern oder Karikaturen.[7] Eine Nutzung der “Weihnachtsfrieden” im Kontext der aktuellen Hochkonjunktur der Erinnerung an den Ersten Weltkrieg ist also naheliegend und auch nicht singulär. Und im Gegensatz zur “Poppy-Pizza” oder Stahlhelmen aus belgischer Schokolade ist der Film auch nicht das Irritierenste, was die Erinnerungsindustrie 2014 hervorgebracht hat.[8] Vielmehr steht der Spot in einer (narrativen) Traditionslinie, die sich seit den ersten Presseberichten über die “Weihnachtsfrieden” im Jahr 1915 herausgebildet hat. Zudem greift der Film auf ältere Visualisierungen des Ereignisses zurück, wie das Musikvideo zu “Pipes of Peace” (1983) von Paul McCartney oder den Kinofilm “Merry Christmas” (2005). Die Geschichte an sich und das Erzählen der Geschichte ist also nicht das Neue aus dem Westen.

Suche nach transnationalen Perspektiven

Übersehen wird etwas Grundlegendes: In der Werbung spiegeln sich auch die zahlreichen Versuche des Erinnerungsjahres 2014, Formen nationaler Erinnerung an den Ersten Weltkrieg zu überwinden oder doch wenigstens um transnationale Formen ergänzen zu wollen.[9] Das äußert sich auch in neuen Denkmalsetzungen. Am 6. Dezember weihten Politiker ein von britischen und deutschen Schülerinnen und Schülern in Erinnerung an die “Weihnachtsfrieden” geschaffenes Denkmal in Belgien ein und am 11. Dezember ein ebensolches Denkmal der UEFA.[10] Die “Weihnachtsfrieden” drängen sich 2014 Erinnerungsort geradezu auf, denn sie bieten einem zusammenwachsenden Europa ein Erinnerungsnarrativ, das es allen Beteiligten ermöglicht, an den Ersten Weltkrieg und die Soldaten in den Schützengraben zu erinnern und sich gleichzeitig – wie im Dezember 1914 – auf den ehemaligen Schlachtfeldern mit friedlicher Absicht die Hände reichen zu können. Das diesjährige Erinnern an die “Weihnachtsfrieden” erzählt viel über die Verbrüderungen von 1914, aber eigentlich noch viel mehr über uns und unsere Sehnsucht nach versöhnlichen Narrativen.

____________________

Literatur

  • Brown, Malcom/Sheaton, Shirley: Christmas Truce. The western front December 1914. London 2014 (Erstauflage: 1984).
  • Bunnenberg, Christian: Christmas Truce. Die Amateurfotos vom Weihnachtsfrieden 1914 und ihre Karriere, in: Paul, Gerhard (Hrsg.): Das Jahrhundert der Bilder. Band 1: 1900 bis 1949. Göttingen 2009, S. 156-163.
  • Weintraub, Stanley: Silent Night. The remarkable Christmas Truce of 1914. London 2001.

Externe Links

____________________

[1] Der Werbefilm von Sainsbury’s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWF2JBb1bvM hatte am 05.12.2014 bereits mehr als 13.775.000 Zugriffe (letzter Zugriff 15.12.2014).
[2] Der Werbefilm von John Lewis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iccscUFY860 und Edeka https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H965m0Hkk5M (letzter Zugriff 15.12.2014).
[3] http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/nov/13/sainsburys-christmas-ad-first-world-war (letzter Zugriff 15.12.2014).
[4] http://www.britishlegion.org.uk/about-us/news/remembrance/sainsburys-and-the-legion-partner-to-bring-ww1-christmas-truce-story-to-life (letzter Zugriff 15.12.2014).
[5] Das Making Of https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jx3pQWbysmM von Sainsbury’s hatte am 15.12.2014 über 369.000 und die Kurzdokumentation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2s1YvnfcFVs über 670.000 Zugriffe (letzter Zugriff 15.12.2014).
[6] Vgl. dazu Bunnenberg, Christian: Dezember 1914: Stille Nacht im Schützengraben – Die Erinnerung an die Weihnachtsfrieden in Flandern, in: Arand, Tobias (Hrsg.): Die “Urkatastrophe” als Erinnerung. Geschichtskultur des Ersten Weltkrieges (= Geschichtskultur und Krieg, Band 1). Münster 2006, S. 15-59. Ausführliche und quellengesättigte Darstellung der “Weihnachtsfrieden” hier: S. 26-44.
[7] Vgl. dazu Bunnenberg, Christian: Christmas Truce. Die Amateurfotos vom Weihnachtsfrieden 1914 und ihre Karriere, in: Paul, Gerhard (Hrsg.): Das Jahrhundert der Bilder. Band 1: 1900 bis 1949. Göttingen 2009, S. 156-163, hier: 162-163.
[8] Bericht über Poppy-Pizza: http://www.london24.com/entertainment/around-the-web/tesco_sells_special_poppy_roni_pizzas_for_remembrance_day_nobody_is_hungry_for_them_1_3842019 (letzter Zugriff 15.12.2014).
[9] An dieser Stelle ein Verweis auf die Tagung “Auf dem Weg zu einer transnationalen Erinnerungskultur? Konvergenzen, Interferenzen und Differenzen der Erinnerung an den Ersten Weltkrieg im Jubiläumsjahr 2014″, die im Oktober 2014 unter der Leitung von Monika Fenn an der Universität Potsdam stattfand (Programm: http://www.uni-potsdam.de/db/geschichte/getdata.php?ID=2891). Ein Tagungsband ist geplant (letzter Zugriff 15.12.2014).
[10] Beschreibungen der Denkmalprojekte der Schülerinnen und Schüler aus Cambridge und Paderborn https://bid.lspb.de/portal/Index/1141780/ und der UEFA http://www.tagesschau.de/ausland/weihnachtsfrieden-ploegsteert-101.html (letzter Zugriff 15.12.2014).

____________________

Abbildungsnachweis
A Tweet by Sainsbury’s © Screeshot by Christian Bunnenberg

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Bunnenberg, Christian: 100 Jahre “Weihnachtsfrieden”. Sehnsucht nach einem neuen Narrativ. In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 45, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-3151.

Copyright (c) 2014 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

The post 100 Years of the “Christmas Truce”. Longing for a New Narrative appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/2-2014-45/100-years-christmas-truce/

Weiterlesen

Kriegsspiel mit Herz? Computer Games zum Ersten Weltkrieg

 

“Wollten Sie auch immer schon einmal pestverseuchte Kühe auf Ihre Gegner werfen?”1 Diesen provokanten Titel trägt eine Publikation zu Computer Games mit historischem Bezug. Er verweist auf das gezielte Töten, das Kriegsspiele, insbesondere Ego-Shooterspiele charakterisiert. Am 25. Juni kam nun überraschend ein außergewöhnliches Spiel zum Ersten Weltkrieg, „Valiant Hearts: The Great War“2, auf den Markt, in dem der Spieler andere nicht tötet, sondern diesen hilft. Das Spiel setzt dabei auf positiv konnotierte Gefühle wie Liebe und Freundschaft der am Krieg Beteiligten – und zwar bemerkenswerterweise über nationale Grenzen hinweg.3 Dabei bewegt sich das Geschehen zwischen Fiktion und Fakten.

 

 

Historisches Lernen im Kriegsspiel?

Ein weiteres, eher neuartiges Ziel des Kriegsspiels ist es, den Adressaten historisch zu unterweisen. Zwar sind die Charaktere der Protagonisten fiktiv gewählt, aber es werden originale Egodokumente (z. B. Feldpostbriefe, Tagebucheinträge) integriert, die dem Handlungsfortgang Authentizität verleihen sollen. Auch die erfundene Geschichte selbst folgt dem chronologischen Verlauf der tatsächlich stattgefundenen Ereignisse (z. B. Schlacht an der Marne, Bombenangriff auf Reims, Gaseinsatz in Ypres, Kampf in den Schützengräben bei Verdun). Dabei liefern Darstellungen Hintergrundinformationen; Quellen werden kommentierend dazu eingeblendet.

Mitgefühl statt Aggression

Mit “Valiant Hearts” hat die französische Firma Ubisoft ein animiertes Graphic-Novel-Abenteuer, ein Amalgam aus Action-, Erkundungs- und Rätselspiel entwickelt, in dem sich der Spieler wechselweise mit Figuren identifiziert, die sich im Kriegsgeschehen des Ersten Weltkrieges befinden und getötet werden können, jedoch andere Menschen nicht zu töten im Stande sind. Es geht um das eigene Überleben und darum, im Kriege verlorene Freunde wiederzufinden, wobei der Einsatz “tapferer Herzen”, wie es der Titel impliziert, notwendig ist. Und das unterscheidet dieses Spiel von den meisten herkömmlichen Kriegsspielen. Zu den Aufgaben des Spielers gehört es, mit Aktionen, wie Sprengen von Gegenständen, Feinden zu entkommen und Freunde zu retten. Dabei ist das Spiel bewusst so angelegt, dass Mitgefühl geweckt wird. Laut Produzenten zielt es darauf ab, “sich gegenseitig zu helfen und in den Grauen des Krieges […] Menschlichkeit zu bewahren.”4 Nicht ohne Stolz berichteten diese bei der Präsentation des Spiels in Paris, dass die Testpersonen auch geweint hätten.

Transnationale Freundschaften

Erzählt wird die Geschichte von vier Protagonisten verschiedener, sich im Krieg feindlich gegenüberstehender Nationalitäten in den Jahren von 1914 bis 1918 und deren Schicksal, das sich im Kriegsgeschehen kreuzt. Über nationale Grenzen hinweg helfen sie sich gegenseitig, sie pflegen oder entwickeln im Lauf des Spiels Freundschaften zueinander. Der Deutsche Karl, der mit einer Französin verheiratet ist, wird eingezogen und muss nun gegen seinen eigenen Schwiegervater, den Franzosen Emile kämpfen. Weitere Protagonisten sind die belgische Krankenschwester Anna und der Amerikaner Freddie, Fremdenlegionär in der französischen Armee. Emile hilft ihm zu Beginn des Spieles etwa, weil er wegen seiner dunklen Hautfarbe diskriminiert wird.

Computerspiele und transnationale Erinnerungskultur

Was im Mega-Gedenkjahr zum Ersten Weltkrieg bislang auffällt: Der aktuelle Erinnerungsboom wird maßgeblich mitgetragen von populären Formen der Geschichtskultur. Insbesondere bei Darstellungsformen wie Filmen, Comics, Ausstellungen und eben auch Computerspielen ist neben der kognitiven und der politischen die ästhetische Dimension besonders ausgeprägt. Nur, was medial (attraktiv) darstellbar ist, kann auch vermittelt werden.5 Zudem wird zunehmend auf transnationale Formen der Erinnerung gesetzt. Das lässt sich etwa in Ausstellungen,6 aber auch Fernsehdokumentationen wie “14 – Tagebücher des Ersten Weltkrieges”7 beobachten. Im Ästhetischen Bereich wirkt – wie in “Valiant Hearts” – häufig das identitätsstiftende Narrativ des gemeinsam erlebten Leides von beteiligten Alltagsmenschen. Fördern diese medialen, von Politik größtenteils losgelösten Formen eine transnationale bzw. europäische Erinnerung mit dem Ziel der Versöhnung? Oder aber wird nur ein banales, emotional verbindendes Narrativ instrumentalisiert, um Kassenschlager zu landen? Der Untertitel des vorgestellten Spiels “The Great War” und andere Narrative im Spiel, etwa die einführende, sehr verkürzte und einseitige Darstellung, wie es zum Krieg kam, deuten darauf hin, dass nationale Erinnerungsmuster bedient werden. Lassen sich transnationale Tendenzen der Erinnerung bei geschichtskulturellen Formen ausmachen, die stärker politisch beeinflusst sind? Welche Anstöße liefert die Geschichtswissenschaft dazu?8

 

 

Literatur

  • Korte, Barbara / Paletschek, Sylvia / Hochbruck, Wolfgang (Hrsg.): Der Erste Weltkrieg in der populären Erinnerungskultur, Essen 2008.
  • Schwarz, Angela (Hg.): “Wollten Sie auch immer schon einmal pestverseuchte Kühe auf Ihre Gegner werfen? ” Eine fachwissenschaftliche Annäherung an Geschichte im Computerspiel, 2. erweiterte Auflage, Münster 2012.
  • Themenheft Aus Politik und Zeitgeschichte zum Ersten Weltkrieg, (64) 2014, Heft 16-17.

Externe Links

 



Abbildungsnachweis
© Monika Fenn. Screenshot des Startmenüs im Computerspiel ‘Valiant Hearts’.

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Fenn, Monika: Kriegsspiel mit Herz? Computergames zum Ersten Weltkrieg. In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 26, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-2334.

Copyright (c) 2014 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: julia.schreiner (at) degruyter.com.

The post Kriegsspiel mit Herz? Computer Games zum Ersten Weltkrieg appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/2-2014-26/kriegsspiel-mit-herz-computer-games-zum-ersten-weltkrieg/

Weiterlesen

Jahre des Gedenkens, Momente des Vergessens

 

Jetzt geht es los, endlich wird es ernst. In diesem Monat besteigen wir das Schiff, das vom festen Ufer der Gegenwart abstößt und uns auf einem Strom der unendlich scheinenden Erinnerung fortträgt. Die Feiern zum 70. Jahrestag der Landung der Alliierten in der Normandie – vor zehn Jahren nahm erstmals ein deutscher Bundeskanzler an der regelmäßig wiederkehrenden Veranstaltung teil – machten den Anfang. Es folgen die Besinnung auf das Attentat von Sarajewo und den Beginn des Ersten Weltkriegs vor einhundert, das Gedenken an die Auslösung des Zweiten Weltkriegs vor fünfundsiebzig, sodann das Fest des Mauerfalls vor fünfundzwanzig Jahren. 2015 stehen dann (u.a.) 70 Jahre 1945 und 25 Jahre 1990 thematisch an. Ist das noch besonnene Geschichtskultur oder ein lärmendes Gedächtnis ohne Maß?

 

 

Vier Jahre Gedenken an den Ersten Weltkrieg?

Die Großspurigkeit historischen Erinnerns wird hier gewiss nicht zum ersten Mal registriert. Bereits das letzte Superjubiläumsjahr 2009 rief manchen Unmut angesichts von Fülle und Intensität der Begängnisse hervor. Umso mehr erstaunt die aktuelle Beobachtung, dass Ausmaß und Inbrunst des Gedenkens immer noch zunehmen, wiewohl regional unterschiedlich. Während man sich in Deutschland 2016 wohl erst einmal zurücklehnen wird (trotz “100 Jahre Verdun”), soll die Erinnerung an den Ersten Weltkrieg in Belgien und Frankreich sogar die vollen vier einschlägigen Jahre umfassen: Genau deswegen heißt das dortige Losungswort zum Centenaire – eingeprägt auf der Rückseite der diesjährigen 2-Euro-Kursmünze von Belgien – nicht etwa 1914-2014, sondern richtig 2014-2018, also: Bürger, der Du dies Geld in die Hand nimmst, gedenke stets seiner historischen Umstände! Naiv zugleich die Annahme, aus ritualisierter Geschichte entspränge Politik: So wird das Vereinigte Königreich eher aus der EU ausgetreten sein, als dass des Premierministers Cameron Plan nicht in die Tat umgesetzt wurde, akut so viele britische Schulkinder wie nur möglich auf die Schlachtfelder Flanderns zu schicken. Kann das nicht alles einmal aufhören? Braucht jemand all diese inszenierte Kommemoration? Womit genau verbindet uns die konnektive Struktur der Wiederholung?

“Erinnert Euch”

In einem bemerkenswerten Beitrag hat Béatrice Ziegler jüngst1 die viel zu oft übersehene Ideologienähe (ich füge hinzu: das Betrügerische) aller Konzepte eines kollektiven und kulturellen Gedächtnisses hervorgehoben. Jene Imperative des “Erinnert Euch” sind, selbst wenn wir ihren Urgrund in einer wohlmeinenden, nach Heil(ung) strebenden jüdisch-christlichen Religion (man vergleiche das alttestamentarische “Zachor”) anerkennen, niemals wertfrei. Ziegler beklagt in diesem machtvollen Spiel besonders die kontraproduktive Diskurshoheit einiger weniger Erinnerungsmeister, die ihre souveräne Stellung für eine Begriffsverwirrung aus Nachlässigkeit oder Absicht missbrauchen. Das beginnt freilich nicht erst mit Aleida Assmann, die in ihrer jüngsten “Intervention” zum “neuen Unbehagen an der Erinnerungskultur“ trotz gutem Willen zu kritischer Aufklärung nicht mehr durchgängig ihrem eigenen Anspruch, “Erinnerung” konsequent als Metapher zu (ent-)werten, gerecht wird.2 Unklar aber waren die Gedächtnis-Begriffe schon bei Maurice Halbwachs und das heißt noch bevor sich das ereignen sollte, was für Deutschland später zum Gegenstand des größten Teils seiner “Erinnerungskultur” wurde. Wie unpassend schief ist daher auch das Wort der “entliehenen Erinnerung”, die, so liest man, Jugendliche mit Migrationshintergrund sich aneignen würden, denn genauso wenig ist doch die “Erinnerung” Heranwachsender ohne aktuelle Zuwanderungsgeschichte etwa an den Nationalsozialismus oder das geteilte Deutschland selbst erworbener Besitz.

Nicht-wissen-Wollen und Nicht-wissen-Müssen

Zum Glück vermag die Geschichtsdidaktik mit ihren gut strukturierten Begriffen Klarheit zu schaffen. Denn sie verfügt – anders als etwa die übrige Geschichtswissenschaft, deren Forschungs- und Mitteilensdrang kein Maß kennen – in ihren ja schon alten Kategorien der Reduktion, Exemplarik und Profilierung über probate Mittel des beherrschten Vergessenmachens (wobei “vergessen” hier genauso uneigentlich, nicht-psychologisch gemeint ist wie “erinnern”). Jedes Geschichtscurriculum, und besteht es aus noch so langen Listen von Bildungsstandards bzw. als solchen verkappten Stoffkatalogen, ist doch lediglich ein Fest des Nicht-wissen-Wollens und Nicht-wissen-Müssens: Was Du hier nicht lernst, lernst Du nimmermehr. “Multiperspektivität” führt – insofern jedwede Perspektive die Beschränkung des Erkenntnisdrangs kalkuliert – zu nichts anderem als einer feiner austarierten Verdrängung. Der reflexive Umgang mit der eigensinnigen Gestaltungskraft des historischen Erzählers durch narrative Kompetenz heißt gerade nicht deren Neutralisierung. Und Geschichtskultur bedeutet wenig mehr als die geschichtsbewusste Organisation des Ausschleichens aus einer bindungsunfähigen Überlieferung. Da sie sich an der pädagogisch geprüften Lebensdienlichkeit historischer Orientierung ausrichtet, operiert die Geschichtsdidaktik dabei jedoch mit einem viel komplexer entwickelten Instrumentarium als autoritäre Oblivionsklauseln in diplomatischen Verträgen nach verheerenden Kriegen oder z.B. Christian Meier, wenn er die ausnahmsweise Unvergesslichkeit des Holocaust am Ende doch ziemlich arbiträr setzt.3

Die religiöse Dimension der Erinnerung

Nein, dieser Text soll keinem Relativismus das Wort reden. Viel zu vieles der jüngeren und älteren Geschichte harrt noch seiner “Aufarbeitung”. Ja, wir wissen von allem nie genug! Das ist aber auch deswegen so, weil wir uns immer schon an zu vieles erinnern (mithin zu wenig didaktisch denken). Jörn Rüsen hat neulich seinen altbewährten Dimensionen von Geschichtskultur (der kognitiven, ästhetischen und politischen) jene von Moral und Religion hinzugefügt. Das hat etwas für sich, weil Erinnern vormals ja eine Gottespflicht war. Wie indessen das Eingedenken einer säkularen Gesellschaft “mit Zukunftsgehalt” (so der Theologe Johann Baptist Metz) aussehen könnte, bleibt weiter offen. Vielleicht richtet es als Alternative zu allem Pomp tatsächlich allein die Mohnblume. Ihr Sommerleuchten immerhin scheint nicht von dieser Welt.

 

 

Literatur

  • Ziegler, Béatrice: “Erinnert euch!” – Geschichte als Erinnerung und die Wissenschaft. In: Gautschi, Peter / Sommer Häller, Barbara (Hrsg.): Der Beitrag von Schulen und Hochschulen zu Erinnerungskulturen. Schwalbach/Ts. 2014, S. 69-89.
  • Lenzen, Verena (Hrsg.): Erinnerung als Herkunft der Zukunft. Bern 2008.

Externer Link

 



Abbildungsnachweis
2-Euro-Münze, Belgien. © Michele Barricelli.

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Barricelli, Michele: Jahre des Gedenkens, Momente des Vergessens. In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 22, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-2203.

Copyright (c) 2014 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: julia.schreiner (at) degruyter.com.

The post Jahre des Gedenkens, Momente des Vergessens appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/2-2014-22/jahre-des-gedenkens-momente-des-vergessens/

Weiterlesen

Vom Jubiläum zur Jubiläumitis

 

Jubiläen, Jahrestage, Gedenktage, Feiertage usw. Der Zufall des Kalenders und die ihn bestimmenden astronomischen Konstellationen definieren zunehmend und heute fast schon ausschließlich, wann sich unser Geschichtsbewusstsein womit beschäftigt. Wenn unsere aktuelle Geschichtskultur – unsere tägliche Praxis der öffentlichen Selbstverständigung, Traditionsversicherung und Identitätsstiftung – wirklich derart dominant kalendergetrieben sein sollte, was bedeutet das für die Akteure der historisch-politischen Bildung?

 

Kampf um den Kuchen

Wir befinden uns im Jahr des 1.-Weltkrieg-Hypes. Der 100. Jahrestag. Mit langem Anlauf haben HistorikerInnen und ihre Verlage teils bewunderungswürdige Buchprojekte lanciert, Museen ihre Sonderausstellungen geplant, Gedenkstätten ihre Objekte herausgeputzt, Buchläden ihre Schaufenster und Kassenstapel neu sortiert, Fernsehen und Radio ihre Geschichtsredaktionen auf die Spur gebracht, Magazine Sonderhefte geplant, PrintjournalistInnen ihre Federn gespitzt. Vom Aufmerksamkeitskuchen wollen sehr viele ein möglichst großes Stück auf ihren Teller. Die deutsche Bundesregierung ist schon Mitte des vergangenen Jahres hart dafür kritisiert worden, dass sie – anders als einige Nachbarregierungen – noch kein offizielles regierungsamtliches Gedenkkonzept vorzulegen hatte.1 Als ob es für die Regierung eines der großen Staaten Europas in der Staatsschuldenkrise nichts Dringenderes zu tun gegeben hätte und als ob die deutschen Parteien mitten im Bundestagswahlkampf die Kraft für ein überparteiliches Geschichtskulturkonzept hätten aufbringen können. Dieser Tage hat die Bundesregierung mit einem Konzept nachgezogen.2 Soll man jetzt aufatmen?

Nichts Neues?

Erinnert sich noch jemand der jüngst vergangenen Hypes? – 2013: der 200. Jahrestag der Leipziger Völkerschlacht und der 75. Jahrestag der Novemberpogrome, 2012: 70. Jahrestag der Wannseekonferenz, 2011: 50 Jahre Mauerbau, 2010: 20 Jahre Deutsche Einheit … die Liste ließe sich lange fortsetzen, und jeder könnte weitere geschichtskulturelle Hypes hinzufügen. – Ist es nur die kapitalistische Aufmerksamkeitsökonomie unserer Zeit, rastlos angetrieben durch die nimmersatten Informationstechnologien, die uns zu Hörigen des Kalenderzufalls macht? Gewiss nicht zuletzt, ja. Aber diese Girlande ritualisierten Gedenkens bedient sich anscheinend auch der menschlichen Wahrnehmung und älterer Bedürfnisse der biografischen Ordnung. Jubiläen erscheinen uns z.B. nicht als menschengemacht, sondern als natürliche Dinge.3 Die Gegenständlichkeit des Kalenders verstärkt diese Täuschung. Eine klassische Entfremdung: Die Wahrnehmung bietet uns Selbstgemachtes als Fremd-Objektives. In dieser Weltwahrnehmung hat sich eine formale Begründungsanalogie privater und öffentlicher Sonder-Feiern (fröhlicher wie trauriger) Geltung verschafft – bei diesen ist es „das Runde“ einer zeitlichen Differenz, das ins Eckige eines Mindestabstands kommt. Ob solche Konstellationen privat schon immer gefeiert wurden? Eher nicht. Anthropologisch eingewurzelt sind rituelle Jahresfeiern, die sich am Fruchtbarkeitszyklus orientieren, die christlich-kirchlichen sind davon abgeleitet. Wir feiern sie alljährlich privat noch heute. Öffentlich geht dagegen die neuartige, nicht mehr organische Feierbegründung auf die breite Vorbildwirkung sächsischer Reformationsjubiläen in der Zeit großer politischer Bedrängung zurück.4 Sie knüpft an die „Erfindung“ des Jubiläums durch Papst Bonifaz VIII. (1300) an, der den Anlass aus seinem alttestamentlichen Kontext des Sabbatjahres löste (Lev 25, 8-55) und der Funktion einer kulturell-politischen Identitätsstiftung zugänglich machte.5 Diese zyklischen, aber eben nicht-annualen Sonderfeiern – die „Jubiläen“ – leben von einer doppelten Anmutung von Natürlichkeit und sind doch eine Institution spezifisch abendländischer Moderne, die von Anfang an historisch-politischen Zwecken diente und von Anfang an auch ein Einfallstor zur Kommerzialisierung der Geschichtskultur war.

Wie geht man damit um?

Die Kulturwissenschaften haben sich vor 10-15 Jahren intensiv bemüht, die Institution des „Jubiläums“ aufzuklären, ohne dass allerdings seitdem zu erkennen gewesen wäre, dass diese Forschungen in der eigenen Zunft eine läuternde Wirkung gehabt hätten. Die vielen stillen KärnerInnen im Weinberg des Herrn gehen ihrer Arbeit nach, des Jubiläumszirkus’ Erregungsschleifen bedienen sich Wenige virtuos und in der Sache auch exzellent, der Rest staunt. Die Akteure der historischen Bildung hecheln oftmals hinterher. Denn was auch sonst? Heutige Lernende leben in einer Welt ständig neuer Jubiläumskampagnen, sie haben Fragen dazu (oder sollten sie zumindest haben). Eine Politik- und Geschichtsdidaktik, die diese Jubiläumszyklik ihrer geschichtskulturellen Lebenswelt ignorierte, wäre de facto lebensfremd und lernfeindlich. Vielleicht ist es so, dass wir uns in Unterricht und Hochschullehre sogar viel intensiver mit dem gesellschaftlichen Phänomen „Jubiläum“ auseinandersetzen sollten – und zwar kritisch-analytisch. Etwas ironisierend könnte man von einer nötigen „Jubiläums-Kompetenz“ sprechen: Diese haben alle Heranwachsenden nötig.

“Jubiläums-Kompetenz” – schon alles?

Nein. Es geht um mehr. Die Tagesordnung unserer kulturellen Selbstverständigung und Identitätsdebatte sollten wir uns nicht vom Kalender und seinen interessierten AusbeuterInnen diktieren lassen. Und wenn die kapitalistische Aufmerksamkeitsökonomie dank ihrer massenmedialen Verstärker in ihrer sachfremden Dynamik wirksam geworden ist und das öffentliche Bewusstsein thematisch zu bestimmen vermag, dann sollten Intellektuelle diese Dynamik durchschaubar machen, kritisieren und eigene begründete Inhalte zu setzen versuchen: Jubiläumitis braucht Therapie. Keinesfalls sollten sie aber eine sachfremde, im Kern ökonomische Dynamik befeuern. Agenda Setting ist ein Königsrecht, wir sollten es nicht einfach aufgeben.

 

 

Literatur

  • Brix, Emil / Stekl, Hannes (Hrsg.): Der Kampf um das Gedächtnis. Öffentliche Gedenktage in Mitteleuropa, Köln u.a. 1997.
  • Müller, Winfried (Hrsg.): Das historische Jubiläum. Genese, Ordnungsleistung und Inszenierungsgeschichte eines institutionellen Mechanismus, Münster 2004.
  • Münch, Paul (Hrsg.): Jubiläum, Jubiläum … Zur Geschichte öffentlicher und privater Erinnerung, Essen 2005.

Externe Links

 


Abbildungsnachweis
Auslage einer Basler Buchhandlung im März 2014 © M. Demantowsky

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Demantowsky, Marko: Vom Jubiläum zur Jubiläumitis. In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 11, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-1682.

Copyright (c) 2014 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: julia.schreiner (at) degruyter.com.

The post Vom Jubiläum zur Jubiläumitis appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/2-2014-11/vom-jubilaeum-zur-jubilaeumitis/

Weiterlesen