The Whig Tradition and Commonwealth History

British and Commonwealth history are deeply entangled. A fresh approach is not to look at British action, but at the Commonwealth' own agency and decisions.

The post The Whig Tradition and Commonwealth History appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-32/commonwealth-history/

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For what it is ‘worth’? Neoliberalism and Public History

This work arose from considerations of the relationship between Public History and the newly marketized UK University sector, mainly through focussing on the skills and impact agenda – neoliberalism on the ground.

The post For what it is ‘worth’? Neoliberalism and Public History appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-12/neoliberalism-public-history/

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Relativity, Historicity and Historical Studies

Paradoxically, relativity or relativism is often presented in an absolutist manner, as the proposition that nothing is true, and as a credo in which all is to be doubted apart from doubt itself....

The post Relativity, Historicity and Historical Studies appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-9/relativity-historicity/

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Prizing Public History?

To create a public history prize is an act of advocacy and of self-assertion. It signals the value and the scale of the activity being celebrated. There has to be enough of it going on and enough people...

The post Prizing Public History? appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-6/public-history-prize/

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Disturbing Historical Ignorance: Narrative, Doxa, Paradox

The absence of the past is often disconcerting and uncanny but is, nevertheless, inevitable. Reflections on the reasons for historical ignorance.

The post Disturbing Historical Ignorance: Narrative, Doxa, Paradox appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/5-2017-10/disturbing-historical-ignorance-narrative-doxa-and-paradox/

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On the Diagnosis and Treatment of Narrative Vices

All history is narrative to one degree or another, as Danto has shown, and those who disdain narrative usually end-up telling stories, nonetheless, in their historical writing. We all live narrative projects...

The post On the Diagnosis and Treatment of Narrative Vices appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/4-2016-37/on-the-diagnosis-and-treatment-of-narrative-vices/

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On the Grammars of School History: Who Whom?

 

English

Grammar has a reputation for tedium, and a well-deserved one, perhaps, given the way in which was traditionally taught and the facility with which concern with grammar can become pedantry.[1] Grammar can, however, be a valuable tool for appraising historical thinking and for reflecting on how school history is made and understood.

 

 

Agency

Consider ‘agency’, or, in grammatical terms, the question ‘Who does what to whom?’[2] Grammatical analysis can reveal a great deal about our relationships with the past. ‘Critical historical consciousness’, for example – the historical equivalent of Nietzsche’s ‘philosophy with a hammer’ – subjects the past to the stringent scrutiny of the present, judging it iconoclastically (as with #RhodesMustFall).

[...]

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/4-2016-11/on-the-grammars-of-school-history-who-whom/

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