Removing the “Past”: Debates Over Official Sites of Memory

How should governments respond to demands for removing historic monuments and renaming sites of memory? What role could historical consciousness play with respect...

The post Removing the “Past”: Debates Over Official Sites of Memory appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-29/removing-past-official-memory/

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Yet Another Memorial in Berlin?

Should yet another monument in Berlin commemorate the Polish victims of the Second World War; in this case Polish citizens who suffered and died during the last war at the hands of German occupants?

The post Yet Another Memorial in Berlin? appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-20/polish-victims-memorial-in-berlin/

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Charlottesville and the Controversial Past in Belgium

Charlottesville 2017. The Belgian press took over the topic a few days later and returned to the issue of monuments and street names: l’héritage colonial.

The post Charlottesville and the Controversial Past in Belgium appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/5-2017-42/charlottesville-and-belgium/

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Are Monuments History?

Historic monuments are making the news. The removal of Confederacy leaders’ statues has provoked reaction in the USA. In Australia, at the same time, news that vandals had defaced the Captain Cook statue in Sydney, garnered attention.

The post Are Monuments History? appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/5-2017-34/are-monuments-history/

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Remembering in Dresden 2017

The bombing of Dresden in 1945 has been interpreted as a barbarian destruction of an “innocent city” - until today. The “Monument” by the Syrian-German artist, M. Halbouni, challenges this remembrance.

The post Remembering in Dresden 2017 appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/5201715/remembering-in-dresden-2017/

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Monuments: Disputed, Transient, increasingly Utopian?

The ensuing issue of modern forms of monuments that are appropriate for the 21st century has seldom been addressed in history teaching. That must be questioned.

The post Monuments: Disputed, Transient, increasingly Utopian? appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/4-2016-40/monuments-increasingly-utopian/

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Good or bad remembrance? No Stolpersteine in Munich

 

English

No “Stolpersteine”? It has become a societal and political consensus to commemorate the Holocaust and the victims of the NS regime. However, the appropriate format is highly debated.[1] This is also the case in the debate about the Stolpersteine project in Munich. Nonetheless, there is a multifaceted remembrance culture in the capital of Bavaria.

 

 



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Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/4-2016-7/good-remembrance-bad-remembrance-no-stolpersteine-in-munich/

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Rhodes must fall! Anatomy of a Protest

The recent protests about the statue of Rhodes at the University of Cape Town (UCT) have resulted in much debate and media coverage. They also present an opportunity to analyse elements of public history and its role.

English

The recent protests about the statue of Rhodes at the University of Cape Town (UCT) have resulted in much debate and media coverage. They also present an opportunity to analyse elements of public history and its role.

 

 

The rise and fall of Rhodes memoralization

Since 1934, students making their way up the many granite stairs that lead to the main campus of the University of Cape Town, where I work, have passed by the imposing statue of Cecil John Rhodes (modelled on Rodin’s The Thinker), which looks out over a wide vista of the eastern side of Cape Town and False Bay.

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Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/3-2015-18/rhodes-must-fall-anatomy-of-a-protest/

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Iconoclasm Backwards. A Lost Memorial Site

Following the irreparable destruction of the equestrian statue depicting Wilhelm I at the Deutsches Eck (German Corner) in Koblenz, a national flag, mounted on the abandoned torso, was located there from 1953 till 1993. …

English

Following the irreparable destruction of the equestrian statue depicting Wilhelm I at the Deutsches Eck (German Corner) in Koblenz, a national flag, mounted on the abandoned torso, was located there from 1953 till 1993. The memorial was a reminder of the German partition, which appeared to be temporarily insurmountable, at least in the contemporary opinion. The monument’s restoration after 1990 terminated its function as a memorial. Thus, the most prominent memorial site for Germany’s partition was lost. A scandal for Public History!

 



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Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/3-2015-18/iconoclasm-backwards-a-lost-memorial-site/

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