Charlottesville and the Controversial Past in Belgium

Charlottesville 2017. The Belgian press took over the topic a few days later and returned to the issue of monuments and street names: l’héritage colonial.

The post Charlottesville and the Controversial Past in Belgium appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/5-2017-42/charlottesville-and-belgium/

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Culture, Civilization and Historical Consciousness

Revisions to the history curriculum currently under way in British Columbia, Canada replace, among other changes, a senior course on Comparative Civilizations with one entitled Comparative Cultures.

The post Culture, Civilization and Historical Consciousness appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/5-2017-41/culture-civilization-and-historical-consciousness/

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Complexity in the Specification of the History Curriculum

Bishop Colenso, Great Britain, and South Africa. A school history curriculum variously gives learners an introduction to historical themes. It does not, however, convey well the complexity of the past.

The post Complexity in the Specification of the History Curriculum appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/5-2017-27/colenso-and-the-history-curriculum/

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A Matter of Choice–Biculturalism

Biculturalism? In the high-autonomy curriculum environment in New Zealand, it is history teachers who are charged with the responsibility of engaging young people with controversial aspects of postcoloniality.

The post A Matter of Choice–Biculturalism appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/5-2017-2/a-matter-of-choice-biculturalism/

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Pedagogías del Sur: Rethinking Research

Pedagogías del Sur: The discussion topics in the field of research in teaching history are the hierarchic historiography-teaching relation; the definition of the epistemology of historical...

The post Pedagogías del Sur: Rethinking Research appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/4-2016-38/pedagogias-del-sur/

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Black or White? Reconciliation on Australia’s Colonial Past

English

Reconciliation? The conservative commentators are at it again. On March 30 this year, The Daily Telegraph attempted to reignite Australia’s “History Wars”[1]. The object of conservative concern was a guide produced by the University of New South Wales that clarified appropriate language use for discussing the history, society, naming, culture, and classifications of Indigenous Australians and Torres Strait Islanders. The newspaper headline, misrepresenting the text of the guide, claimed, “UNSW rewrites the history books to state Cook ‘invaded’ Australia”[2].

 

 

The Struggle for Public Memory

The guide states that “invasion” is a more appropriate term to describe Australia’s past than “settlement”, which was the received and taught history right up until the late 1980s, the period within which many of the most vocal conservative commentators went to school.

[...]

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/4-2016-16/reconciling-perspectives/

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“A historically conscious future” – Indigenous perspectives on war remembrance

 

English

Whilst war remembrance in New Zealand is dominated by ANZAC and Gallipoli, there is a growing momentum to commemorate the colonial wars of the 19th century between indigenous Māori and the British/colonial forces. This raises questions about how post-colonial nations such as New Zealand address the difficult features of their past as well as ensure that young people engage with different perspectives on war remembrance that are inclusive of difference and encourage them to think critically about such issues.

 

 

Waimarama Anderson und Leah Bell

War remembrance in New Zealand is closely aligned with an ideal of ANZAC[1] identity that primarily focuses on this country’s part in the unsuccessful attempt by the Allies in 1915 to invade the Gallipoli peninsula, the sovereign territory of what is now Turkey.

However, there is a growing momentum to also commemorate the colonial wars of the 19th century between Māori[2] and the British/colonial forces[3] and this has recently gained traction from an unexpected quarter.

[...]

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/4-2016-15/indigenous_war_remembrance_new_zealand/

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