Projekt Hans Bouchard Mexikanische Social Media Communities #dhmasterclass

In meinem Forschungsvorhaben mit dem Arbeitstitel „Kulturen im Netz – Netz der Kulturen: Mexikanische Social Media Communities in den virtuell-medialen Räumen der Produktion und Vernetzung“ untersuche ich die Relationen zwischen den sozialen Plattformen, ihren Nutzern und Communities und der Produktion und Vernetzung anhand von Vertretern der mexikanischen Social Media Communities.

Zunächst ist zu klären, wie in dieser Arbeit soziale Medien definiert sind und wie sich diese strukturieren. Die Kernelemente der sozialen Medien bilden das Netzwerk-Element und das Content-Element, welche auf einigen Plattformen bspw. auf YouTube in der Kanalseite der einzelnen Benutzer konvergieren (angesehene/gelikte Videos als Content- sowie Netzwerkelement). Das Charakteristische der sozialen Medien besteht somit aus ihrer Dualität der Netzwerk-Elemente und Content-Elemente, wobei die Netzwerk-Elemente durch eine Verknüpfung des Nutzers, als auch durch automatische Strukturen und Ontologien der informationstechnischen Strukturen produziert werden. In der Konsequenz möchte ich soziale Medien im Allgemeinen als Portale/Plattformen zur Präsentation, Produktion und Distribution von digitalen Objekten (nach Yuk Hui 2012; 2016) beschreiben, welche unter dem folgenden Schema operieren:

Ziel ist es durch diese Betrachtung festzustellen, inwieweit man von einer Netzkultur sprechen kann und wie das Verhältnis der unterschiedlichen kulturellen Räume in den sozialen Medien verhandelt wird. Welche kulturellen Identitäten und Gruppen lassen sich finden, wodurch kennzeichnen sich diese und inwieweit unterscheiden sie sich von ihrem „Offline“-Äquivalent?

[...]

Quelle: http://dhdhi.hypotheses.org/2966

Weiterlesen

Borders In the Head: Comparing Mexican and Berlin Wall

In order to understand previous and contemporary political conflicts through history education in both formal and informal environments, it is imperative to comprehend what has happened and where a certain event has happened.

The post Borders In the Head: Comparing Mexican and Berlin Wall appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/5-2017-23/borders-in-the-head-comparing-the-mexican-and-the-berlin-wall/

Weiterlesen

The Dictator’s Slow Return. Porfirio Díaz

Español

El 2 de julio de 2015 se conmemoró el centenario luctuoso del dictador Porfirio Díaz, quien gobernó México, en la silla presidencial o detrás de ella, entre 1876 y 1910, cuando fue derrocado por la revolución mexicana. La opinión pública aprovechó la coyuntura para discutir una vez más sobre el significado de su figura en la historia de México, pero en el mundo educativo nada se modificó sustancialmente, pues los tiempo educativos son de larga duración. El significado histórico de Porfirio Díaz en los programas de estudio y los libros de texto se ha sedimentado: enseñar como legítima la desigualdad económica que lacera a México.[1]

 

Opiniones divididas

Porfirio Díaz es uno de los villanos[2] de la historia que mejor ha recuperado su imagen en la actualidad. Díaz fue un dictador. Su periodo, denominado Porfiriato, se caracterizó en lo político por reelecciones infinitas, violencia contra la oposición, control de la prensa y un centralismo autoritario. En lo social la desigualdad y la exclusión fueron las características centrales, con una pequeña élite inmensamente rica, grandes sectores de la población en indignante pobreza y algunos otros en semi esclavitud dentro de las haciendas.

[...]

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/4-2016-17/dictators-slow-return-porfirio-diaz/

Weiterlesen

History, Interculturality and Cognitive Pluriverses

English


Public debates over the teaching of history in Mexico have focused on the inclusion of specific content and the interpretation of historical events that have marked the nation’s history. Nevertheless, contemporary didactic proposals have evaded the subject and have been concerned with the proximity between professional historical thought and its teaching, without modifying traditional historical narratives taught in schools. However, the pedagogical dispute about the inclusion of historical science in the classroom has pushed the country’s multicultural characteristics into the background. What does the teaching of contemporary history in Mexico include and exclude? How can the problem be thought of from an intercultural dimension?

 

The Politics of Interculturality

Driven by global policies in favor of the recognition of indigenous peoples[1] and by the confrontation with the political and armed movement of the Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional (EZLN; Zapatista National Liberation Army), the Mexican government modified the Constitution and established, in 2002, that the Mexican nation “has a pluricultural composition upheld by its indigenous peoples who are those who descended from populations that inhabited the country’s current territory at the start of colonization and preserved their own institutions.”[2] This modification implied, at least legally, the abandonment of mestizo identity that spread with special force from the 1940s onwards, when schools served—and continue to serve in practice—as a central tool for its perpetuation. Since that time, the reforms in school curricula for teaching history, among other subjects, were forced to include the new focus on the nation’s identity.

[...]

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/3-2015-33/history-interculturality-and-cognitive-pluriverses/

Weiterlesen

43 Are Missing from the Teaching of History in Mexico

 

Mexico is experiencing a drawn-out crisis in human rights. The disappearance and subsequent murder of 43 students studying to be rural teachers last September is yet another example of this. At the same time, programs for studying history at the level of basic education and teacher training deny this reality.

 

English


Mexico is experiencing a drawn-out crisis in human rights. The disappearance and subsequent murder of 43 students studying to be rural teachers last September is yet another example of this. At the same time, programs for studying history at the level of basic education and teacher training deny this reality by taking refuge in theoretical and methodological approaches produced for other national and cultural contexts. Which history should be taught to promote a just and fair Mexico?

[...]

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/3-2015-15/43-are-missing-from-the-teaching-of-history-in-mexico/

Weiterlesen

Lenin and Marx as symbols of liberation?

Are historical representations and collective memories one and the same thing? Why and how do they coincide or differ? Local and national contexts most definitely play an important role …

English

Are historical representations and collective memories one and the same thing? Why and how do they coincide or differ? Local and national contexts most definitely play an important role in this respect. But it is also important and necessary to examine which social and cultural processes influence citizens in aligning memory and history. Let us consider a recent and very drastic example.

 

 

Communism is still alive

The picture above shows a students’ meeting in Guerrero, Mexico, on November 23, 2014.[1] The students gathered are discussing protest actions in response to the disappearance of 43 fellow students on September 26, 2014.[2] The students who disappeared were most probably abducted for protesting against discrimination and other forms of political violence. This incredible incident has produced the most important political scandal in Mexico in recent years. As can be seen, images of Marx, Engels, and Lenin are among the permanent political symbols at this educational establishment. The image includes the well-known sentence from Marx’s thesis about Feuerbach. It is an image very similar to those found in many places throughout Latin America. Plausibly, the presence of these images indicates that for this particular political movement, and probably for many others in Latin America, Marxist and revolutionary characters are very influential for the interpretation of the past. For a majority of Latin America’s youth, Marxist symbols and characters are no doubt representatives or models of resisting political oppression, economic exploitation, and human rights violations. In this vein, it is important to consider that the Marxist weltanschauung has traditionally drawn on history as a social scientific underpinning of its grand narrative of progress and emancipation, ultimately carried out by the Russian revolution. It is very likely that this grand narrative is being represented on the Mexican mural seen above. However, comparing this image with the numerous images depicting the destruction of Marxist monuments all over the former Soviet Union immediately after the collapse of communism raises several questions. For example, how is it possible that Mexican students consider Lenin and Marx as cultural and political models of liberation whereas both figures represent oppression in other parts of the world?

A new view of Marx

Both viewpoints are based more on collective memories than on historiographic research. As I mentioned, collective memories involve selective forgetting. This may also happen in a historiographic endeavor, but the latter at least aims to systematically avoid forgetfulness. For example, various recent publications [3] have shown how Soviet regimes were characterized by an enormous repression of political adversaries and citizens, close allegiance with the Nazi regime, and produced more than 11 million victims. This is clearly “forgotten” by the Mexican students. But at the same time it can be argued that the massive destruction of Marxist monuments “forgets” the systematic repression of Marxist political leaders and citizens by military regimes in Latin America, often supported by the government of the United States of America.[4] In short, it is clear that collective memories are basically contextual and to some extent reactive. In other words, they appear in the context of a particular inherited social and political past. It is along these lines that these Mexican students vindicate the revolutionary role of Marxist figures because these represent their attempt to gain emancipation and civil rights. Probably the students do not consider Marxist figures as symbols of oppression, because this has not been the case in their local and national experience. On the other hand, citizens from former communist countries see in monuments inspired by Marxism the oppression they experienced for decades in their societies. Historiographic research strives for a broader view of social and political problems and takes into account more than one perspective on the past. Collective memories, however, are contextual and local. The most relevant social, cultural, and political context for citizens is their own current national society.

A nationalist trend in history education?

Interestingly, these two divergent settings—Latin American countries and former communist societies—have something in common: their tendency to ground their history education and curriculum mostly in nationalist contents. In both cases, a nationalist view of the past is taken to be perfectly compatible with a particular position regarding the Marxist-Leninist grand narrative. This nationalist trend in history education has been analyzed in much detail.[5] For example, in Mexico students and teachers took to the streets when the government tried to change the school history curriculum through educational reforms in 1992 and 2000 respectively.[6] These historical contents mainly concerned national figures, such as the Child Heroes who fought against the North American army. These children are popular heroes in Mexico, even though their actual role in the military conflict has not been well documented until now. The Mexican government tried to implement a new history curriculum, in which these and similar figures were not present anymore. The attempt to change the history curriculum, and to make it less nationalist, was perceived by a part of the citizenry as an assault on both their collective memory and their historical knowledge. On the other hand, according to Ahonen,[7] both Estonia and the former German Democratic Republic transformed their history curricula radically after the collapse of the communism in order to base them on nationalist narratives and concepts. This tendency is even stronger now and takes into account the very nationalist and patriotic orientation adopted by Russia in recent years under President Putin.[8] Comparing these examples of collective memories, as framed by certain contexts, reveals the contribution of modern history as a discipline to constructing multi-perspective accounts of the past. On the other hand, particularly as regards the collapse of the Soviet Union,[9] the contribution of collective memory to history writing is very clear. As Le Goff observes, “Popular archives can correct official archives, even though the latter can hide and therefore reveal some truths that have been kept a secret.”[10] Thus, collective memory and historiography combined can counteract the attempts of political, ideological, or economic powers to use, suppress, or manipulate history to suit their own interests.[11]

 

____________________

 

Literature

  • Carretero M. and van Alphen F. (forthcoming) History, Collective Memories or National Memories? How the representation of the past is framed by master narratives. In B. Wagoner ( Ed.) Oxford Handbook of Culture and Memory. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Carretero, M. (2011). Constructing patriotism. Teaching history and memories in global worlds. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
  • Levintova, E. (2010). Past imperfect: The construction of history in the school curriculum and mass media in post-communist Russia and Ukraine. Communist and Post-Communist Studies, 43, 125-127.

External link

____________________

 

[1] http://internacional.elpais.com/internacional/2014/10/17/actualidad/1413568451_060339.html (last accessed 18.12.2014).
[2] See: http://elpais.com/elpais/2014/11/10/inenglish/1415647325_524994.html. (last accessed 14.01.2015).
[3] Snyder, T. (2012). Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin. New York, NY: Basic Books.
[4] See for example the collective memory of political violence during the 70´s in South America: Jelin, E. (2003). State Repression and the Labors of Memory. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.
[5] Carretero, M., Asensio, M. & Rodriguez-Moneo, M. (Eds.) (2012) History Education and the Construction of National Identities. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
[6] Carretero, M. (2011). Constructing patriotism. Teaching history and memories in global worlds. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing, esp. chapter 2.
[7] Ahonen, A. (1997). A transformation of history: The official representations of history in East Germany and Estonia, 1986-1991. Culture and Psychology, 3, 41-62.
[8] Levintova, E. (2010). Past imperfect: The construction of history in the school curriculum and mass media in post-communist Russia and Ukraine. Communist and Post-Communist Studies, 43, 125-127. doi: 10.1016/j.postcomstud.2010.03.005.
[9] Brossat, A., Combe, S., Potel, J., & Szurek, J. (Eds.) (1992). En el este, la memoria recuperada. València: Edicions Alfons el Magnànim. [First published in 1990 as: A l’Est, la memoire retrouvée, Paris: Éditions La Découverte.]
[10] Ibid., p. 16; translated from Spanish.
[11] Le Goff, J. (1992). Prefacio. In A. Brossat, S. Combe, J. Potel, J. Szurek (Eds.), En el este, la memoria recuperada (pp. 11-17). València: Edicions Alfons el Magnànim. [First published in 1990 as: A l’Est, la memoire retrouvée, Paris: Éditions La Découverte.]

____________________

Image Credits
© Saúl Ruiz, 2014. Mexican students of Education in a meeting about civil rights. The mural is quoting Marx: “Until now philosophers have only interpreted the world. What is necessary is to transform it.”.

Recommended Citation
Carretero, Mario: Lenin and Marx as symbols of liberation? In: Public History Weekly 3 (2015) 3, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-3302.

Copyright (c) 2015 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

 

 

Deutsch

 

Sind historische Repräsentation und kollektive Erinnerung dasselbe? Warum und wie stimmen sie überein oder unterscheiden sie sich? Auf jeden Fall spielt der lokale und nationale Kontext dabei eine wichtige Rolle. Ebenso wichtig und notwendig ist es jedoch zu analysieren, welche sozialen und kulturellen Prozesse die BürgerInnen dabei beeinflussen, ihre Erinnerung und Geschichte miteinander in Einklang zu bringen. Betrachten wir dazu ein aktuelles und sehr drastisches Beispiel.

 

Der Kommunismus lebt!

Die Abbildung oben zeigt das Treffen von Studierenden in ihrer Bildungseinrichtung in Guerrero, Mexiko, am 23. November 2014.[1] Sie diskutieren über Protestaktionen als Reaktion auf das Verschwinden von 43 KommilitonInnen am 26. September 2014.[2] Diese wahrscheinlich gewaltsam entführten StudentInnen hatten gegen Diskriminierung und andere Formen der politischen Gewalt protestiert. Dieser unglaubliche Vorfall wurde zum bedeutendsten politischen Skandal in der jüngeren Geschichte Mexikos. Man kann dem Bild entnehmen, dass die Abbildungen von Marx, Engels und Lenin zu den permanenten politischen Symbolen an dieser Schule gehören. Der bekannte Satz aus Marx‘ Abhandlung über Feuerbach ist ebenfalls auf dem Plakat enthalten. Es ist eine Abbildung, die in ähnlicher Form an vielen Stellen in Lateinamerika gefunden werden kann. Das Vorhandensein dieser Bilder ist ein deutliches Indiz dafür, dass für diese spezielle politische Bewegung, und wahrscheinlich noch viele andere in Lateinamerika, marxistische und revolutionäre Persönlichkeiten sehr einflussreich für die Interpretation der Vergangenheit sind. Für die Mehrheit der lateinamerikanischen Jugend sind marxistische Persönlichkeiten und Symbole zweifellos Repräsentanten oder Vorbilder des Widerstands gegen politische Unterdrückung, wirtschaftliche Ausbeutung und Verletzungen der Menschenrechte. In diesem Sinne ist es wichtig zu berücksichtigen, dass die marxistische Weltanschauung traditionell die Geschichte als sozialwissenschaftliche Untermauerung ihrer historischen Meistererzählung von Fortschritt und Emanzipation heranzieht, der letztlich durch die russische Revolution vollzogen worden sei. Es ist sehr wahrscheinlich, dass sich diese Narration in dem mexikanischen Wandbild der Abbildung darstellt. Wenn wir nun die Porträts in der Abbildung mit den vielen Bildern vergleichen, die die Zerstörung marxistischer Denkmäler in der ehemaligen Sowjetunion unmittelbar nach dem Zusammenbruch des Kommunismus zeigen, dann entstehen sofort Fragen. Zum Beispiel: Wie ist es möglich, dass die mexikanischen StudentInnen Lenin und Marx als politische und kulturelle Vorbilder der Befreiung ansehen und diese Charaktere zur selben Zeit in anderen Teilen der Welt für Unterdrückung stehen?

Ein neuer Blick auf Marx

Beide Sichtweisen stützen sich mehr auf kollektive Erinnerung als auf historiografische Forschung. Wie bereits erwähnt, beinhaltet kollektive Erinnerung auch selektives Vergessen. Etwas, das auch bei einem historiografischen Zugriff passieren kann, doch zielt diese zumindest auf die systematische Vermeidung von Vergesslichkeit ab. Als Beispiel haben jüngere Publikationen gezeigt, wie das Sowjetregime sich durch enorme Unterdrückung politischer GegnerInnen sowie BürgerInnen im Allgemeinen auszeichnete, eine Allianz mit dem NS-Regime eingegangen ist und mehr als 11 Millionen Opfer verschuldete.[3] Dies wurde von den mexikanischen StudentInnen natürlich “vergessen”. Zugleich kann man argumentieren, dass die massive Zerstörung der marxistischen Denkmäler die systematische Unterdrückung von marxistischen politischen Führungspersönlichkeiten und BürgerInnen im Allgemeinen durch Militärregimes in Lateinamerika “vergessen” lässt, die oftmals durch die Regierung der Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika unterstützt wurden.[4] Kurz gesagt ist es klar, dass kollektive Erinnerungen im Grunde kontextabhängig und in einem gewissen Maße reaktiv sind. Mit anderen Worten erscheinen sie im Kontext einer bestimmten, ererbten gesellschaftlichen und politischen Vergangenheit. In diesem Sinne rechtfertigen die mexikanischen StudentInnen die revolutionäre Rolle der marxistischen Abbildungen, da diese für ihr Bestreben stehen, Emanzipation und Bürgerrechte zu erlangen. Wahrscheinlich nehmen sie marxistische Abbildungen nicht als Symbole der Unterdrückung wahr, weil eine solche marxistisch begründete Unterdrückung in ihren lokalen und nationalen Erfahrungen nicht der Fall gewesen ist. Andererseits sehen BürgerInnen aus ehemals kommunistischen Ländern in marxistisch inspirierten Denkmälern die Unterdrückung, die sie in ihrer jeweiligen Gesellschaft während Jahrzehnten erfahren und durchmachen mussten. Historiografische Forschung versucht, einen umfassenderen Blick auf soziale und politische Probleme zu werfen und dabei mehr als nur eine Perspektive auf die Vergangenheit in Betracht zu ziehen. Kollektive Erinnerungen sind aber kontextabhängig und lokal verortet, und der bedeutsamste soziale, kulturelle und politische Kontext für BürgerInnen ist die eigene gegenwärtige nationale Gesellschaft.

Ein nationalistischer Trend beim historischen Lernen?

Interessant ist dabei, dass die beiden divergierenden Szenarien lateinamerikanischer Länder und früherer kommunistischer Staaten dennoch etwas gemeinsam haben. Wir beziehen uns auf deren Tendenz, den Geschichtsunterricht und die entsprechenden Curricula auf nationalistische Inhalte zu stützen. In beiden Fällen erweist sich eine nationalistische Sichtweise auf die Vergangenheit als komplett kompatibel mit der spezifischen Haltung der marxistisch-leninistischen Meistererzählung. Diese nationalistische Tendenz im Geschichtsunterricht ist bereits sehr ausführlich untersucht worden.[5] So demonstrierten zum Beispiel in Mexiko SchülerInnen und LehrerInnen – und traten in Streik – als die Regierung in den Jahren 1992 und 2000 versuchte, die Inhalte des schulbezogenen historischen Lernens mit einer Bildungsreform zu verändern.[6] Die historischen Inhalte bezogen sich zumeist auf nationale Symbole, wie etwa die Kinderhelden, die gegen die nordamerikanische Armee kämpften. Diese Kinder sind populäre Volkshelden in Mexiko, auch wenn ihre tatsächliche Rolle in diesem Konflikt bislang noch nicht hinreichend gut dokumentiert ist. Die mexikanische Regierung versuchte, im Unterrichtsfach Geschichte einen Lehrplan zu implementieren, in dem diese und ähnliche Symbole nicht mehr vorhanden sind. Der Versuch, den Geschichts-Lehrplan zu ändern und ihn weniger nationalistisch zu gestalten, wurde von Teilen der Bürgerschaft als ein Angriff auf ihre kollektive Erinnerung und ihr geschichtliches Wissen wahrgenommen. Andererseits, so eine Untersuchung von Ahonen,[7] wurden in Estland und in der früheren DDR nach dem Zusammenbruch des Kommunismus die geschichtlichen Inhalte der Lehrpläne radikal verändert, indem sie mehr auf nationalistische Narrative und Konzepte gestützt wurden. Dieser Trend ist gegenwärtig sogar noch stärker, wenn wir die stark nationalistische und patriotische Orientierung berücksichtigen, die sich in Russland in den letzten Jahren unter Präsident Putin etabliert hat.[8] Wenn wir diese Beispiele kollektiver Erinnerung, die von bestimmten Zusammenhängen umrahmt werden, vergleichen, kann der Beitrag der modernen disziplinären Geschichtswissenschaft durch die Konstruktion multiperspektivischer Zugänge deutlich gemacht werden. Andererseits, besonders beim Niedergang der Sowjetunion,[9] wird der Beitrag der kollektiven Erinnerung zur Geschichtsschreibung sehr deutlich. Le Goff formuliert es so: “Menschliche Archive können amtliche Archive korrigieren, selbst wenn letztere in der Lage sind, einige geheim gehaltene Wahrheiten zu verstecken und folglich auch aufzudecken.”[10] Werden kollektive Erinnerung und Geschichtsschreibung also kombiniert, können sie Versuchen der politischen, ideologischen oder wirtschaftlichen Mächte entgegenwirken, Geschichte in ihrem eigenen Interesse zu benutzen, zu unterwerfen oder zu manipulieren.[11]

____________________

 

Literatur

  • Carretero, Mario  / van Alphen, Floor: History, Collective Memories or National Memories? How the representation of the past is framed by master narratives. In: B. Wagoner ( Hrsg.) Oxford Handbook of Culture and Memory. Oxford (im Erscheinen).
  • Carretero, Mario: Constructing patriotism. Teaching history and memories in global worlds. Charlotte, NC 2011.
  • Levintova, Ekaterina: Past Imperfect. The construction of history in the school curriculum and mass media in post-communist Russia and Ukraine. In: Communist and Post-Communist Studies 43 (2010) 2, S. 125-127.

Externer Link

____________________

 

[1] http://internacional.elpais.com/internacional/2014/10/17/actualidad/1413568451_060339.html (zuletzt am 18.12.2014).
[2] See: http://elpais.com/elpais/2014/11/10/inenglish/1415647325_524994.html. (zuletzt am 14.01.2015).
[3] Snyder, Timothy: Bloodlands. Europe Between Hitler and Stalin. New York 2012.
[4] Vgl. z.B. die kollektive Erinnerung der politischen Gewalt während der 70’er Jahre in Südamerika: Jelin, Elizabeth: State Repression and the Labors of Memory. Minneapolis, MN 2003.
[5] Carretero, Mario / Asensio, Mikel / Rodriguez-Moneo, María (Hrsg.): History Education and the Construction of National Identities. Charlotte, NC 2012.
[6] Carretero, Mario: Constructing patriotism. Teaching history and memories in global worlds. Charlotte, NC 2011, besonders Kapitel 2.
[7] Ahonen, Sirkka: A transformation of history. The official representations of history in East Germany and Estonia, 1986-1991. In: Culture and Psychology (1997) 3, S. 41-62.
[8] Levintova, Ekaterina: Past Imperfect. The construction of history in the school curriculum and mass media in post-communist Russia and Ukraine. In: Communist and Post-Communist Studies 43 (2010) 2, S. 125-127. doi: 10.1016/j.postcomstud.2010.03.005.
[9] Brossat, Alain u.a. (Hrsg.): En el este, la memoria recuperada. València 1992. [Erstveröffentlichung 1990 unter dem Titel: A l’Est, la memoire retrouvée, Paris: Éditions La Découverte.]
[10] Ebd., S. 16; übersetzt aus dem  Spanischen.
[11] Le Goff, Jacques: Prefacio. In: Brossat, Alain u.a. (Hrsg.), En el este, la memoria recuperada.  València 1992 [Erstveröffentlichung 1990 unter dem Titel: Al’Est, la Memoire retrouvée, Paris: Editions La Découverte.] S. 11-17.

____________________

Abbildungsnachweis
© Saúl Ruiz, 2014. Mexikanische Studenten der Erziehungswissenschaften bei einem Treffen über Bürgerrechte. Die Inschrift des Banners zitiert Marx: “Die Philosophen haben die Welt nur verschieden interpretiert; es kommt aber darauf an, sie zu verändern.”

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Carretero, Mario: Lenin und Marx als Symbole der Befreiung? In: Public History Weekly 3 (2015) 3, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-3302.

Copyright (c) 2015 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

 


The post Lenin and Marx as symbols of liberation? appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/3-2015-3/lenin-marx-symbols-liberation/

Weiterlesen

Youth, Resistance, and Public Uses of History in Mexico

 

Conventional wisdom on the teaching of history in Mexico holds that the problem of learning is that today’s young people only think about the present and they are incapable of assessing the past and the future…


English

 

Conventional wisdom on the teaching of history in Mexico holds that the problem of learning is that today’s young people only think about the present and that they are incapable of assessing the past and the future. To remedy this, study programs now focus on developing various historical thinking skills grounded in the scientific work of historians. However, I believe this approach is based on an erroneous appraisal of youth and excludes other ways of using history.

 

Tepoztlán, Morelos

Tepoztlán is a town whose long history makes its presence felt. Not far from Mexico City, it was declared a National Park in 1937. A pilgrimage zone from pre-Hispanic times, it has paramount sixteenth-century titles to communal lands and it fought together with Emiliano Zapata in the Mexican Revolution of 1910. The townspeople put up a united front to oppose a forest clearing project in the 1930s that threatened to devastate the nearby forests and fought against an aerial tramway (1979), a prison (1979), a beltway (1986), a scenic train (1990), and the construction of a golf course that planned to replace agricultural lands with an exclusive residential zone in 1995. Six years later, the town hosted the Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional (EZLN: Zapatista National Liberation Army). It is both a Mexican and a cosmopolitan town.

The Current Conflict

As part of a project aimed at connecting both oceans[1] and given the saturation of the toll highway—especially on weekends—that passes on one side of Tepoztlán, federal and state governments started an expansion project in 2011. Popular resistance to the project was organized and when construction work began in 2013, a group of townspeople staged a sit-in, setting up the “Caudillo del Sur” camp—in Zapata’s honor—for sustained civil disobedience to put a stop to the work. Their argument is that the new road will expropriate land, harm the environment, and change the local population’s lifestyle. In July that same year, the state government used force, violently razing the camp. The Frente Unido en Defensa de Tepoztlán (FUDT; United Front in Defense of Tepoztlán) decided to pursue the legal route and managed to temporarily halt construction. Now the resolution of the problem is mired in the swamps of the Mexican judicial system.

FJDT, History and Resistance

The Frente Juvenil en Defensa de Tepoztlán (FJDT; Youth Front in Defense of Tepoztlán) is part of the FUDT. It is composed of a diverse group of young people whose identity is defined to a large extent by their rural background. They conduct peaceful protests and actively spread their ideas on blogs and social networks. Their expressions of protest wield history as a central part of their arguments. What stands out, however, is their historical-graphic discourse, which decorates the walls of the town and those of the neighboring communities. These wall paintings depict the idealized pre-Hispanic past and reject capitalism, governmental institutions, and the violence of authorized crime (that is, violence exerted or permitted by the state).[2] The FJDT’s historical narrative is a discourse of resistance. As age-old heirs, they believe their “experience does not begin with this struggle. It began years ago when we saw our fathers and our grandfathers organize to defend the town to the pealing of the church bells.”[3] They took their stand on nation, youth, identity, ecology, history, and religion in a single resistance movement. Of course, this has nothing to do with the historical thinking of historians that they should be acquiring at school.

Street Art

Perhaps the most significant representation of the use of history as a political tool is FJDT mural painting. Full of contrasting bright colors, the walls of houses tell stories that look at the past and address the future. One of the murals shows a painting—which in the eyes of art critics might be tagged with the deficient label of naïve art—of the repetition of history, where the past is like the present, both in its devastating power and in its restoration of hope. It depicts Nahua eagle warriors clashing with Spanish conquerors. Then it shows a businessman stealing money, destroying the forest, and fleeing on the highway, while other pre-Hispanic warriors confront him. On another mural, a capitalist who declares progress confronts a chinelo, a Carnival dancer, who is exclaiming “culture” while clutching his machete. The dichotomy seems simple, but in reality what we have is an ambivalent process in which two different temporalities are opposed and at the same time are formed thanks to the other. For the businessman, the future, evolutionary and universal, lies ahead; for the chinelo and pre-Hispanic warriors, the future lies behind and before them: it is the conservation and transformation of the past composed of culture and nature. Both need the other, one to dominate and the other to resist.

Thinking Historically and Other Uses of History

FJDT youth have been accused of everything: being ninis (NEETs), agitators, fundamentalists, and enemies of progress. If we add to this the conception of young people held by the developers of the state school history curriculum,[4] namely, that FJDT members live only for the moment, without any awareness of the past and future, the resistance against the Tepoztlán highway may seem to be nothing more than a protest staged by a group of young misfits incapable of thinking historically. However, if the struggle against the highway is seen as a battle against temporal typologies (civilized versus primitive, modern versus peasant) [5], we might be able to understand how legitimate uses of history are also a substantial part of political participation.
These uses, normally excluded in the classroom, will continue to drive the struggle to promote the social and symbolic inclusion of different cultures in Mexico and to ensure that there is history beyond Braudel.

 

____________________

 

Literature

  • Velázquez, Mario Alberto. (2008). “La construcción de un movimiento ambiental en México. El club de golf en Tepoztlán, Morelos”, Región y sociedad, vol 20, no. 43, pp. 62–96.
  • Sousa Santos, Boaventura de. (2010). Refundación del estado en América Latina. Una perspectiva desde una epistemología del Sur, Bogota/Mexico City, Universidad de los Andes, Siglo del Hombre Editores/Siglo XXI.

External links

 

____________________

[1] Within this mega-project, other development plans include a thermoelectric plant in Huexca, Morelos, and a gas pipeline crossing the states of Puebla, Morelos, and Tlaxcala. The towns in this valley also oppose these projects.
[2] This is not the only important youth movement. In addition to #yosoy132, which fights for the democratization of the media, another similar movement in defense of forests against illegal logging is composed of the indigenous youth of Cherán, Michoacán.
[3] Romero, Carolina (2012) “En Tepoztlán los pueblos se organizan en defensa de la tierra, el agua y el aire” at http://www.anarkismo.net/article/23686 (last accessed 24.10.2014)
[4] Lima, Laura; Bonilla, Felipe; Arista, Verónica (2010) “La enseñanza de la historia en la escuela mexicana.” Proyecto Clío (Barcelona) 36.
[5] Vargas Cetina, G. (2007) “Tiempo y poder: la antropología del tiempo,” Nueva Antropología, vol. 20, no. 67, May, 2007, pp. 41–64. http://www.redalyc.org/articulo.oa?id=15906703 (last accessed 24.10.2014)

____________________

Image Credits
© Frente Juvenil En Defensa De Tepoztlán, 2014. https://www.facebook.com/FJDTepoz/photos/a.498856276794339.123068.497297213616912/729932403686724/?type=3&theater.

Recommended Citation
Plà, Sebastiàn: Youth, Resistance, and Public Uses of History in Mexico. In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 37, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-2779.

Copyright (c) 2014 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: julia.schreiner (at) degruyter.com.

 

 

 

Deutsch

 

Nach gängiger Meinung über den Geschichtsunterricht in Mexiko liegt das Problem mit dem Lernen von Geschichte darin begründet, dass die Jugend von heute nur über die Gegenwart nachdenkt und unfähig ist, Vergangenheit und Zukunft zu beurteilen. Um dies zu ändern, ist in den Studiengängen der Fokus auf die Ausbildung einer Reihe von Fähigkeiten des historischen Denkens gelegt worden, die auf den wissenschaftlichen Arbeitsmethoden von HistorikerInnen basiert. Allerdings glaube ich, dass dieser Zugang auf einer fehlerhaften Einschätzung der Jugendlichen und auf einem Ausschluss anderer Wege, Geschichte zu nutzen, beruht.

 

Tepoztlán, Morelos

Tepoztlán ist eine Stadt, die ihre Geschichte spürbar macht. Sie liegt nicht weit entfernt von Mexico City und wurde 1937 zum Nationalpark erklärt. Sie ist ein Pilgerort aus prähispanischen Zeiten, besitzt seit dem 16. Jahrhundert Besitzansprüche von höchstem Rang an Gemeindeland und kämpfte gemeinsam mit Emiliano Zapata in der mexikanischen Revolution von 1910. Die StadtbewohnerInnen leisteten gemeinsam Widerstand gegen ein Waldrodungsprojekt in den 1930er Jahren, das die Wälder in der Nähe bedrohte. Sie wehrten sich gegen eine Drahtseilbahn (1979), gegen ein Gefängnis (1979), gegen eine Umfahrungsstrasse (1986), gegen eine touristische Sightseeing-Bahn (1990) sowie 1995 gegen den Bau eines Golfplatzes, der Ackerland und exklusive Wohnzonen hätte ersetzen sollen. Sechs Jahre beherbergte die Stadt den Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional (EZLN: die Zapatistische Armee der Nationalen Befreiung). Sie ist sowohl eine mexikanische wie eine kosmopolitische Stadt.

Der gegenwärtige Konflikt

Als Teil eines Projekts, das beide Küsten verbinden und die – vor allem an Wochenenden – übernutzte bezahlpflichtige Autobahn entlasten sollte,[1] die neben Tepoztlán vorbeiführt, lancierten die nationalen Behörden und jene des Teilstaates im Jahr 2011 ein Ausbauprojekt. Dagegen entwickelte sich in der Bevölkerung Widerstand und als 2013 die Bauarbeiten aufgenommen werden sollten, inszenierte eine Gruppe von StadtbewohnerInnen ein Sit-In und bauten ein Camp, das sie – zu Zapatas Ehren – “Caudillo del Sur” nannten. Damit sollte ein dauerhafter ziviler Widerstand etabliert werden, um einen Baustopp zu erzwingen. Sie begründeten ihren Widerstand damit, dass das Straßenprojekt zu Landenteignungen und Umweltschäden führen und die Lebensbedingungen der EinwohnerInnen von Tepoztlán beeinträchtigen würde. Im Juli des gleichen Jahres räumte die Regierung das Camp mit Gewalt und riss die Bauten ab. Der Frente Unido en Defensa de Tepoztlán (FUDT; Gemeinsame Front zum Schutze Tepoztláns) entschied sich dafür, sich auf dem Rechtsweg zu wehren. Dabei gelang es ihr, die Bauarbeiten vorübergehend anzuhalten. Nun steckt die Lösung im Sumpf des mexikanischen Justizsystems fest.

FJDT, Geschichte und Widerstand

Der Frente Juvenil en Defensa de Tepoztlán (FJDT; Jugend Front zum Schutze Tepoztláns) ist Teil des FUDT. Er besteht aus unterschiedlichen Gruppen von Jugendlichen, die ihre Identität größtenteils mittels ihrer ländlichen Herkunft definieren. Sie führen friedvolle Protestkundgebungen durch und verbreiten ihre Ansichten in Weblogs und sozialen Netzwerken. In all ihren Äußerungen nutzen sie die Geschichte als zentralen Bestandteil ihrer Argumentation. Doch was heraussticht, ist ihr historisch-graphischer Diskurs, mit dem sie die Mauern der Stadt und der Nachbargemeinden dekoriert haben. Darin zeigen sie durchgehend Bilder einer idealisierten prähispanischen Vergangenheit verbunden mit der Ablehnung des Kapitalismus, der Regierungsinstitutionen und der Gewalt staatlicher Kriminalität, (worunter sie verbrecherische Gewalt verstehen, die vom Staate ausgeht oder von ihm geduldet wird). Das historische Narrativ der FJDT ist ein Widerstandsdiskurs. Sie sehen sich als Erben einer uralten Tradition, denn “die Erfahrung beginnt nicht erst mit diesem Kampf. Sie beginnt vor Jahren, als wir sahen, wie unsere Väter und Großväter beim Klang der Kirchenglocken unsere Stadt verteidigten.”[3] In einer einzelnen Widerstandsbewegung beziehen sie Stellung zu Fragen der Nation, Jugend, Identität, Ökologie, Geschichte und Religion. Natürlich hat das nichts mit dem historischen Denken von HistorikerInnen zu tun, so wie sie es in der Schule hätten lernen sollen.

Straßenkunst

Die vielleicht signifikanteste Form, wie Geschichte als politisches Werkzeug eingesetzt werden kann, ist die Wandmalerei der FJDT. Voller kontrastierender leuchtender Farben erzählen die Häuserwände Geschichten, die in die Vergangenheit blicken und sich an die Zukunft richten. Eine der Wandmalereien zeigt eine Zeichnung, die in den Augen der Kunstkritik abschätzig als naive Malerei bezeichnet werden könnte. Doch die Zeichnung zeigt die Wiederholung der Geschichte, in der sich die Vergangenheit wie die Gegenwart darstellt, sowohl in ihrer verheerenden Macht, wie auch in der Wiederherstellung von Hoffnung. Sie zeigt die “Adlerkämpfer” der Nahua im Kampf mit den spanischen Eroberern. Dann zeigt sie einen Geschäftsmann, wie er Geld stiehlt, den Wald zerstört und dann auf der Autobahn flieht, während andere prähispanische Kämpfer sich ihm in den Weg stellen. Auf einer anderen Wandmalerei wird ein Kapitalist, der den Fortschritt verkündet, einem chinelo gegenübergestellt, einem Karnevalstänzer, der – mit der Machete in der Hand – nach Kultur schreit. Der Gegensatz erscheint simpel, doch in Wirklichkeit sehen wir einen ambivalenten Prozess, in dem zwei verschiedene Güter einander gegenübergestellt werden und zugleich, bedingt durch das jeweilige Gegenstück, erst ihre Form finden. Für den Geschäftsmann liegt die Zukunft als evolutionäres und universelles Geschehen vor ihm; für den chinelo und die prähispanischen Kämpfer liegt die Zukunft zugleich hinter und vor ihnen, da die Zukunft zugleich Konservierung wie Transformation der Vergangenheit bedeutet, die zugleich Kultur und Natur umfasst. Beide brauchen einander: Der eine dominiert, der andere leistet Widerstand.

Historisches Denken und andere Anwendungen der Geschichte

Die Jugendlichen der FJDT sind aller möglichen Dinge beschuldigt worden: Sie seien ninis (also NEET = Not in Education, Employment, or Training), AgitatorInnen, FundamentalistInnen und Fortschrittsfeinde. Fügen wir hier das Konzept hinzu, das die Verfasser von Geschichtslehrplänen an Volksschulen von Jugendlichen haben,[4] dann handelte es sich, mit anderen Worten, um Individuen, die lediglich für den Moment leben und denen jedes Bewusstsein für Vergangenheit und Zukunft abgeht. Somit könnte der Widerstand gegen die Autobahn bei Tepoztlán verstanden werden als nichts weiter als eine Gruppe von jugendlichen AußenseiterInnen, die nicht in der Lage sind, historisch zu denken. Doch wenn wir den Widerstand gegen die Autobahn als einen Kampf gegen temporale Typologisierungen[5] (zivilisiert-primitiv, modern-bäuerlich) betrachten, dann können wir verstehen, dass es sich hier um eine legitime Anwendung von Geschichte als Teil einer politischen Partizipation handelt.
Diese Verwendungen, die für gewöhnlich aus dem Schulunterricht ausgeschlossen sind, werden weiterhin eine Rolle dabei spielen, die verschiedenen Kulturen in Mexiko sozial und symbolisch zu verbinden und damit zu behaupten, dass es eine historische Zeit jenseits von Braudel gibt.

____________________

Literatur

  • Velázquez, Mario Alberto. (2008). “La construcción de un movimiento ambiental en México. El club de golf en Tepoztlán, Morelos”, Región y sociedad, vol 20, no. 43, pp. 62–96.
  • Sousa Santos, Boaventura de. (2010). Refundación del estado en América Latina. Una perspectiva desde una epistemología del Sur, Bogota/Mexico City, Universidad de los Andes, Siglo del Hombre Editores/Siglo XXI.

 

Externe Links

____________________

[1] Im Rahmen dieses Megaprojekts gibt es noch Pläne für eine thermoelektrisches Kraftwerk in Huexca, Morelos und eine Gas-Pipeline, die durch die Staaten von Pubela, Morelos und Tlaxcala führen soll. Die Städte in diesem Tal wehren sich ebenfalls gegen diese Projekte.
[2] Dies ist nicht die einzige wichtige Jugendbewegung. Neben #yosoy132, die für die Demokratisierung der Medien kämpft, besteht eine ähnliche Bewegung, die sich für den Schutz der Wälder gegen illegale Abholzung einsetzt und sich aus jugendlichen Eingeborenen aus Cherán, Michoacán, zusammensetzt.
[3] Romero, Carolina (2012) “En Tepoztlán los pueblos se organizan en defensa de la tierra, el agua y el aire”. http://www.anarkismo.net/article/23686 (letzter Zugriff am 24.10.2014)
[4] Lima, Laura; Bonilla, Felipe; Arista, Verónica (2010) “La enseñanza de la historia en la escuela mexicana.” Proyecto Clío (Barcelona) 36.
[5] Vargas Cetina, G. (2007) “Tiempo y poder: la antropología del tiempo,” Nueva Antropología, vol. 20, no. 67, May, 2007, pp. 41–64. http://www.redalyc.org/articulo.oa?id=15906703 (Letzter Zugriff am 24.10.2014)

____________________

Abbildungsnachweis
© Frente Juvenil En Defensa De Tepoztlán, 2014. https://www.facebook.com/FJDTepoz/photos/a.498856276794339.123068.497297213616912/729932403686724/?type=3&theater.

Übersetzung aus dem Englischen
von Jan Hodel

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Plà, Sebastiàn: Youth, Resistance, and Public Uses of History in Mexico. In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 37, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-2779.

Copyright (c) 2014 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: julia.schreiner (at) degruyter.com.

 

 

Español

La enseñanza de la historia en México sostiene que el problema de aprendizaje se debe a que los jóvenes contemporáneos sólo piensan en el presente y son incapaces de valorar el pasado y el futuro. Para solucionar esto, los programas de estudios han creado una serie de competencias del pensar históricamente que se fundamentan en el quehacer científico de los historiadores. Sin embargo, considero que esta propuesta parte de un diagnóstico equivocado de los jóvenes y de la exclusión de otras formas de usar la historia.

  

Tepoztlán, Morelos

Tepoztlán es un pueblo con mucha historia presente. Próximo a la ciudad de México, fue decretado Parque Nacional en 1937. Zona de peregrinación desde el prehispánico, posee títulos primordiales de tierras comunales del siglo XVI y luchó junto a Emiliano Zapata en la Revolución Mexicana de 1910. El pueblo resistió frente a un proyecto maderero de los años treinta que amenazó con devastar los bosques aledaños, luchó contra un teleférico (1979), una cárcel (1979), un periférico (1986), un tren escénico (1990) y la construcción de un campo de golf que pretendía sustituir las tierras de cultivo por una zona residencial exclusiva en 1995. Seis años después fueron anfitriones del Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional (EZLN). Es un pueblo mexicano y cosmopolita a la vez.

El conflicto actual

Como parte de un proyecto que busca conectar ambos océanos[1] y ante la saturación de la carretera de cuota –especialmente los fines de semana- que pasa a un costado de Tepoztlán, los gobiernos federal y estatal iniciaron planes de ampliación en 2011. La resistencia popular al proyecto se organizó y cuando en 2013 se iniciaron las obras, un grupo de pobladores instaló el campamento “Caudillo del Sur” para detener los trabajos. Su argumento es que con la nueva carretera se expropiarán tierras, se dañará el medio ambiente y se trastocará la forma de vida del pueblo. En julio de ese mismo año, el gobierno estatal desalojó violentamente el campamento. El Frente Unido en Defensa de Tepoztlán (FUDT) decidió tomar el camino judicial y consiguieron detener temporalmente la construcción. En este momento, la resolución del problema se encuentra en los pantanos de la justicia mexicana.

FJDT, historia y resistencia

El Frente Juvenil en Defensa de Tepoztlán (FJDT) es parte del FUDT. Está compuesto por un grupo plural de jóvenes para quienes lo rural es parte constitutiva de su identidad. Realizan protestas pacíficas y difunden sus ideas activamente en blogs y diversas redes sociales. En todas sus manifestaciones usan la historia como parte central de sus argumentos, pero sobresale su discurso histórico-gráfico que ha decorado las paredes del pueblo y las comunidades aledañas. En ellas, constantemente muestran imágenes del pasado prehispánico idealizado, rechazo al capitalismo, a las instituciones gubernamentales y a la violencia del crimen autorizado, es decir, al producido o permitido por el Estado.[2] La narrativa histórica del FJDT es un discurso de resistencia. Como herederos milenarios, consideran que su “experiencia no comienza con esta lucha. Comenzó desde hace años cuando veíamos a nuestros padres y nuestros abuelos organizarse para defender al pueblo al repique de las campana”.[3] Nación, juventud, identidad, ecología, historia y religión se atrincheran en un solo movimiento de resistencia. Eso sí, nada de pensar históricamente como historiadores, de acuerdo con las competencias que debe desarrollar la escolarización.

Arte callejero

La representación más significativa del uso de la historia como instrumento político sea la pintura mural del FJDT. Llena de colores contrastantes y llamativos, las paredes de las casas narran historias que miran al pasado y se dirigen al futuro. En uno de los murales se puede observar una pintura –que a los ojos de críticos de arte podría ser catalogada con la deficitaria etiqueta de arte naíf- en donde aparece la repetición histórica, en la que el pasado es como el presente, tanto en su poder devastador como en su esperanza restauradora. Ahí aparecen guerreros águilas nahuas que enfrentan a los conquistadores españoles. A continuación, se presenta un empresario robando dinero, devastando el bosque y huyendo por la autopista, mientras otros guerreros prehispánicos se le enfrentan. En otro mural, a un capitalista que grita progreso se le enfrenta un chinelo, danzante del carnaval, que con machete en mano grita cultura. La dicotomía parece simple, pero en realidad lo que tenemos es un proceso ambivalente en la que dos temporalidades diferentes se oponen. En el empresario el futuro está adelante, es evolutivo y universal; en el chinelo y los guerreros prehispánicos el futuro está atrás y adelante, en donde el porvenir es la conservación y la transformación del pasado compuesto por la cultura y la naturaleza.

Pensar históricamente y otros usos de la historia

Los jóvenes del FJDT han sido acusados de todo: ninis, revoltosos, fundamentalistas y enemigos del progreso. Si a esto le agregamos la concepción de joven que tienen los creadores de los programas de historia para la educación obligatoria,[4] es decir, individuos que sólo viven para el presente sin conciencia de pasado ni futuro, se podría pensar que la resistencia contra la autopista de Tepoztlán no es más que un grupo de inadaptados incapaces de pensar históricamente. Sin embargo, si observamos la lucha contra la autopista también como una batalla contra tipologías temporales[5] (civilizado-primitivo, moderno-campesino), podremos comprender cómo usos legítimos de la historia también son parte sustancial de la participación política.
Estos usos, normalmente excluidos del aula, seguirán luchando para promover la inclusión social y simbólica de diferentes culturas en México y sostener que hay tiempo histórico más allá de Braudel.

 

____________________

 

Bibliografía

  • Velázquez, Mario Alberto (2008) “La construcción de un movimiento ambiental en México. El club de golf en Tepoztlán, Morelos” Región y sociedad, vol XX, no. 43, pp. 62-96.
  • Santos Sousa, Buenaventura. (2010) Refundación del estado en América Latina. Una perspectiva desde una epistemología del Sur, México, Universidad de los Andes, Siglo del Hombre Editores, Siglo veintiuno editores.

Vínculos externos

____________________

[1] Dentro del mega proyecto hay planes de una termoeléctrica en Huexca, Morelos y un gasoducto que atraviesa los estados de Puebla, Morelos y Tlaxcala. Los pueblos de este valle también se encuentran en rebeldía.
[2] No es el único movimiento juvenil relevante. Además del #yosoy132 que lucha por la democratización de los medios, otro movimiento similar pero defendiendo los bosques contra los aserraderos ilegales es el de jóvenes indígenas de Cherán, Michoacán.
[3] Romero, Carolina (2012) “En Tepoztlán los pueblos se organizan en defensa de la tierra, el agua y el aire” en http://www.anarkismo.net/article/23686
[4] Lima, Laura; Bonilla, Felipe; Arista, Verónica (2010) “La enseñanza de la historia en la escuela mexicana”. Proyecto Clío 36: Barcelona.
[5] Vargas Cetina, G. (2007) “Tiempo y poder: la antropología del tiempo” en Nueva Antropología, vol. XX, núm. 67, mayo, 2007, pp. 41-64. http://www.redalyc.org/articulo.oa?id=15906703

____________________

Créditos de imagen
© Frente Juvenil En Defensa De Tepoztlán, 2014. https://www.facebook.com/FJDTepoz/photos/a.498856276794339.123068.497297213616912/729932403686724/?type=3&theater.

Citar como
Plà, Sebastiàn: Youth, Resistance, and Public Uses of History in Mexico. In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 37, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-2779.

Copyright (c) 2014 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: julia.schreiner (at) degruyter.com.

 

 

 


The post Youth, Resistance, and Public Uses of History in Mexico appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/2-2014-37/youth-resistance-public-uses-history-mexico/

Weiterlesen