Accessing the Sessions of the Bamberg Cathedral Chapter

Conservative estimates assume that towards the end of the early modern period, more than a tenth of the population of the Holy Roman Empire lived in ecclesiastical states.1 In Franconia, the proportion was even higher.2 Almost half of the inhabitants of the Franconian Imperial District belonged to an ecclesiastical dominion, i.e. were ruled by prince-bishops or abbots. While their functions in the Germania Sacra can already be considered well researched, less is known about their co-rulers, the cathedral chapters. The Bamberg DFG project “Governance, transition management and memory of an ecclesiastical corporation. Scriptuality of the Bamberg cathedral chapter” has therefore dedicated itself to this corporation – starting with the sessions that formed the centre of the chapter’s decision making. For the project, they were collated in a database by Alissa L’Abbé and Oliver Kruk.



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Quelle: https://blog.factgrid.de/archives/3696

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Modelling Premodern Political Entities – Case Studies from Eastern Europe

Words shape our understanding of the world. Especially in times of Disinformation, we as scholars need to be sensitive about the framing in which we put the knowledge we would like to share. The obstacles of this task become even higher in Digital Humanities. When we write a paper, we might come up with lengthy explanations why something might not be that simple. But a Graph Database such as FactGrid confronts us with the challenge of describing complex, sometimes ambivalent, sometimes contradictory historical realities in a simple statement about certain objects and the relationship between them. In the following, I would like to present some problems, that came across me during a recent research Seminar at Halle University. I will present solutions, that we came up with; hopefully offering a model for others as well. While doing so, I argue that we as scholars should emphasize the importance of a qualitative sensibility for historical realities, even and especially in times, when our discipline is changing towards digital tools and Big Data.

Competing Claims and Composite Rulership



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Quelle: https://blog.factgrid.de/archives/3642

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At least a make shift solution: The “Julian calendar stabiliser”

My last blog post triggered a couple of responses on Twitter. It seems I touched a problem that will not be solved that easily.

Save a date as a Julian calendar date on your Wikibase (manually or, with the /J switch, in your QuickStatements mass input) and your Wikibase will be able to handle this date correctly in any mixed bag of Julian and Gregorian dates. It is nice that the Query Service is able to produce straight timelines out of any such mixed bag, but immensely problematic that you will be quite unable to get any of the Julian dates back in the nominal format in which you stated them on your Wikibase. Blazegraph, the tool that works behind the Query Service, does its job in a normalisation of dates, and this normalisation is, of course, done in the superior Gregorian calendar. Our Wikibase Query Services will hence produce loads of dates that will in their first wave just contradict the documentary evidence. We will then see successive deformations of these dates wherever someone fails to read them as, from here onwards, proper Gregorian. Most databases have a single calendar format: you simply enter all your dates as you read them in your documents or whatsoever source you are exploiting. Gregorianised dates should not enter any such database.

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Quelle: https://blog.factgrid.de/archives/3541

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A software that does Julian and Gregorian Calendar dates, or why Wikibase is about to lead us into utter confusion

It was in February 2019 at a conference dinner of medievalists in Jena when I was first confronted with the calendar problem which Wikibase had been posing ever since it had digested its first Julian calendar dates. I had given a Wikibase demonstration earlier that day and now I was sitting next to a medievalist who was ready to destroy me: “Wikibase”, he stated, “is a genuine disaster without anyone understanding it.”

I demanded to hear why that should be the case and He asked me to show him the first random medieval date I would find on Wikidata. I had activated my phone and landed on a 16th-century biography…

“See that small print?” he asked, “the dates are all noted as a Gregorian calendar dates before 1584.”

The qualifier was odd.

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Quelle: https://blog.factgrid.de/archives/3467

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Roscher’s Lexikon of Mythology as Linked Open Data: Starting a Project on FactGrid

In the age of Linked Open Data, the humanities have increasingly turned their attention from the mere collection of data to its modelling with ontologies and data models. In the field of Greek mythology, these approaches have started in very recent times. Alongside (or undothe creation of new databases like MANTO [1], Mythoskop [2], Theoi.com [3] and ToposText [4] (to name but a few), at least three attempts have been made to create an ontology for Greek mythology. In 2018, C. Syamili and R. V. Rekha outlined an ontology for mythical heroes with reference to Wikipedia and the Theoi project [5]. From a classicist’s point of view, R. Scott Smith of the MythLab team has written a series of blogposts with great scholarly detail, which not only address the modelling of mythical characters but also of events, objects and locations [6].

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Quelle: https://blog.factgrid.de/archives/3454

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Erste Hilfe beim Zuordnen mittelalterlicher Ortsnamen (5770 Vorschläge)

Anfang des Jahres fragten wir (ich gab die Frage für Kathleen Schnabel und das Team Robert Gramsch-Stehfests ins Netz) die Welt der “Twitter Mediävisten” nach einem klugen Tipp, wie wir gut 3000 mittelalterliche Ortsnamen identifiziert bekämen. Es handelte sich um Ortsnennungen, die Studenten, die sich zwischen 1392 und 1450 an der Uni Erfurt einschrieben, zu ihren Namen in die Matrikellisten gaben, niedergeschrieben wohl immer nach Gehör.

Der Tweet war erstaunlich erfolgreich: 13.900 mal gesehen, 115 mal geliked, 100 mal weiterversandt. Hilfreiche Antworten kamen aus allen Richtungen.

Quelle: https://blog.factgrid.de/archives/3408

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A FactGrid vocabulary of types of functional texts after Eckard Rolf

auf Deutsch

The data set in basic queries:

Quelle: https://blog.factgrid.de/archives/3358

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Eckard Rolfs Vokabular der Gebrauchstextsorten als FctGrid-Angebot

FactGrid-Vokabular der Gebrauchstextsorten nach Eckard Rolf, Die Funktionen der Gebrauchstextsorten (Berlin/ New York, 1993), alphabetisch, Download-Optionen am rechten Rand im mouse-over.https://tinyurl.com/2yltc97r

Mit dem folgenden Link-Angeboten lässt sich ein erstes „kontrolliertes Vokabular“ – zu Gattungen von Gebrauchstexten – aus dem FactGrid ziehen, sowohl als einfache Wortliste wie mit inhaltlichen Durchdringungen und (ersten) Übersetzungen. Im Moment hat dieses Angebot noch experimentellen Charakter. Wikibase ist eine Software für Wissensgegenstände, nicht für Worte. Die Gegenstände erhalten Q-Nummern und Bezeichnungen in verschiedenen Sprachen – Worte dagegen würde man in ihren Sprachen belassen und untersuchen wollen. Die Wikibase-Entwickler erweiterten darum 2018 ihr Angebot: zu den Q-Nummern für die Dinge des Wissens kamen L-Nummern für „Lexeme“, die in ihren Sprachen bleiben und nun Aussagen zu Bedeutungen auf sich ziehen.

Die Gebrauchstextsorten, die Eckard Rolf 1993 erfasste und sortierte, sind eindeutig Wissensgegenstände, also die Angelegenheit für Q-Nummern. Eine „Mahnung“ ist eine Aufforderung, eine versäumte Zahlung nachzuholen – man kann diese Erklärung in verschiedenen Sprachen geben und die verschiedensten Sprachen haben eben darum ihre Worte für den Gegenstand: „dunning“ im Englischen, „mise en demeure“ im Französischen.

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Quelle: https://blog.factgrid.de/archives/3061

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PhiloBiblon receives a new grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities

We are delighted to announce that PhiloBiblon, a database of the primary sources for the study of medieval Iberia,  has received a two-year implementation grant from the Humanities Collections and Reference Resources program of the National Endowment for the Humanities to complete the mapping of PhiloBiblon from its almost forty-year-old relational database technology to the Wikibase technology that underlies Wikipedia, Wikidata, and FactGrid. The project will start on the first of July and, Dios mediante, will finish successfully by the end of June 2025.

The fundamental problem is to map the 422,000+ records of PhiloBiblon’s bibliographies with their complexly interrelated relational tables to the triplestore structure of Wikibase. A triplestore relates two Items by means of a Property. Thus a Work is linked to an Author by the Property “written by.”

We received an NEH Foundations grant for this project in 2021, as described in detail in PhiloBiblon: From Siloed Databases to Linked Open Data via Wikibase: Proof of Concept. Over the course of the last two years, the pilot project team, consisting of Charles Faulhaber (PI), Patricia García Sánchez Migallón and Almudena Izquierda (doctores por la UCM), Berkeley undergraduate Spanish and data science majors (Julieta Soto, Serena Bai, Tina Lin, Cassandra Calciano, Martín García Ángel), Max Ziff (data engineer), and Josep Formentí (user interface programmer), with the guidance of Olaf Simons, has analyzed the data structures of PhiloBiblon’s ten relational tables (using BETA for the test cases) and worked out the procedures needed to convert them into triplestore structures.



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Quelle: https://blog.factgrid.de/archives/3196

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FactGrid Goes NFDI

Friday week before last, we received the news that so many working groups had been eagerly awaiting: the 4Memory consortium (of historical studies) will become part of the Nationale Forschungsdateninfrastruktur (NFDI), the German National Research Data infrastructure.

This is exciting news for FactGrid, just weeks before its fifth birthday. We will be acting as an official repository for historical data in the upcoming NFDI structure. German projects can now make a good case that FactGrid is the optimal platform for their data.

NFDI4Memory task areas

Changing the rules of our present research data management

The German National Research Data Infrastructure aims to bring transparency and sustainability to all research fields, from microbiology to computational linguistics. Whether researchers are still collecting data entirely for themselves in private Word documents and Excel spreadsheets, or whether they are working on digital platforms that are more or less designed like conventional books, designed to be read and looked at – they will face new questions in their research grant applications: Do they produce data? Do they correct publicly available data? If so, the new questions will be: How do they make sure that others can actually work with their data?

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Quelle: https://blog.factgrid.de/archives/3104

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