Guerre, après-guerre et post-après-guerre

Could some of Sloterdijk’s disturbing interpretations of French-German relations since 1945 turn out to be right? And should they be worrying to us?

The post Guerre, après-guerre et post-après-guerre appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/8-2020-5/german-french-reconciliation/

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Memória Brasileira do Autoritarismo: Um Novo Rumo

Brazil is going through a politically sensitive time. After two decades of reconciliation projects, Jair Bolsonaro was elected president in 2018.

The post Memória Brasileira do Autoritarismo: Um Novo Rumo appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/8-2020-2/brazils-memory-bolsonaro/

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Māori History and a Sense of Place

The recently launched Māori History website has the potential to see Māori views successfully accommodated in history. It also provides an example of how a bold curriculum initiative ...

The post Māori History and a Sense of Place appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-1/maori-history-sense-place/

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Musical as Public History. District Six

 

English

District Six: The Musical (1987) is arguably South Africa’s most popular musical.[1] It was followed by a number of spin off musicals on the same theme, the most recent of which is a reprise, District Six Kanala [Please], currently completing a run in Cape Town.[2] It is, however, far more than a musical.

 

District Six

Cape Town’s District Six came into being in the 1840s, as the original town between the sea and Table Mountain expanded residentially towards the east. It became an inner city neighbourhood, home to a very diverse population, as waves of immigrants found their first homes there. By the mid-twentieth century, it had become run-down and known for its gangs.

[...]

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/4-2016-22/music-public-history/

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Black or White? Reconciliation on Australia’s Colonial Past

English

Reconciliation? The conservative commentators are at it again. On March 30 this year, The Daily Telegraph attempted to reignite Australia’s “History Wars”[1]. The object of conservative concern was a guide produced by the University of New South Wales that clarified appropriate language use for discussing the history, society, naming, culture, and classifications of Indigenous Australians and Torres Strait Islanders. The newspaper headline, misrepresenting the text of the guide, claimed, “UNSW rewrites the history books to state Cook ‘invaded’ Australia”[2].

 

 

The Struggle for Public Memory

The guide states that “invasion” is a more appropriate term to describe Australia’s past than “settlement”, which was the received and taught history right up until the late 1980s, the period within which many of the most vocal conservative commentators went to school.

[...]

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/4-2016-16/reconciling-perspectives/

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