Collecting and Dividing Identities in the Age of Brexit

Contemporary populist narratives tend to foreground “othering” to a remarkable degree. Is there a future for “collectivity” in an age of division?

The post Collecting and Dividing Identities in the Age of Brexit appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/8-2020-2/identities-brexit/

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On the Presences and Absences of Pasts

Despite its limitations, perhaps etymology can point to subterranean connections between words, spark possibilities for reflection and, thus, create or make explicit neglected semantic possibilities?

The post On the Presences and Absences of Pasts appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/7-2019-24/etymology-historical-thinking/

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Understanding Empire in the 21st Century

People should have some understanding of what empires are, and what effect they have. What questions are worth asking about the concept of Empire at this point in the 21st century?

The post Understanding Empire in the 21st Century appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/7-2019-13/understanding-empires/

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LUK – Reading Re-Writings of Official History

Official narratives as in LUK give us insights into national identity management. This is particularly true when they aim to project identity outwards.

The post LUK – Reading Re-Writings of Official History appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/7-2019-3/luk/

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The Whig Tradition and Commonwealth History

British and Commonwealth history are deeply entangled. A fresh approach is not to look at British action, but at the Commonwealth' own agency and decisions.

The post The Whig Tradition and Commonwealth History appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-32/commonwealth-history/

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For what it is ‘worth’? Neoliberalism and Public History

This work arose from considerations of the relationship between Public History and the newly marketized UK University sector, mainly through focussing on the skills and impact agenda – neoliberalism on the ground.

The post For what it is ‘worth’? Neoliberalism and Public History appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-12/neoliberalism-public-history/

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Relativity, Historicity and Historical Studies

Paradoxically, relativity or relativism is often presented in an absolutist manner, as the proposition that nothing is true, and as a credo in which all is to be doubted apart from doubt itself....

The post Relativity, Historicity and Historical Studies appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-9/relativity-historicity/

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Prizing Public History?

To create a public history prize is an act of advocacy and of self-assertion. It signals the value and the scale of the activity being celebrated. There has to be enough of it going on and enough people...

The post Prizing Public History? appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-6/public-history-prize/

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Disturbing Historical Ignorance: Narrative, Doxa, Paradox

The absence of the past is often disconcerting and uncanny but is, nevertheless, inevitable. Reflections on the reasons for historical ignorance.

The post Disturbing Historical Ignorance: Narrative, Doxa, Paradox appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/5-2017-10/disturbing-historical-ignorance-narrative-doxa-and-paradox/

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