On Listening I: The Interpersonal

The forest has been a favourite retreat for Germans for centuries. It has also been romantically transfigured by the poets and thinkers of this country. It is usually far away from the hustle...

The post On Listening I: The Interpersonal appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-27/listening-interpersonal/

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(Pre-)Scientific Information Retrieval and Wikipedia

Search engines often used for (pre)scientific information retrieval. Wikipedia is a common encyclopedia with more or less suitable articles. Whoever teaches students should emphasize to check such sources carefully.

The post (Pre-)Scientific Information Retrieval and Wikipedia appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-26/information-retrieval/

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“Of Monsters and Men” – Shoah in Digital Games

D-Day 1944, charging out of the landing-craft right into the chaotic hell of Omaha Beach. After only a few metres the screen goes dark, I have been shot – and not for the last time. Digital Games.

The post “Of Monsters and Men” – Shoah in Digital Games appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-23/shoah-in-digital-games/

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The Digital Archive: An In-school Place of Learning

Digitisation projects in the humanities have democratised access to sources in recent years. Museums, libraries and archives place their holdings of texts, films and images on the scanner...

The post The Digital Archive: An In-school Place of Learning appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-22/digital-archive-school/

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Virtual Time Travels? Public History and Virtual Reality

History education and Public History are both challenged to provide guidance on how to deal with the respective Virtual Reality offers in a reflected and critical manner.

The post Virtual Time Travels? Public History and Virtual Reality appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-3/public-history-and-virtual-reality/

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Wissen2go – Teacher-Centered Instruction on YouTube

On YouTube's Wissen2go channel, a journalist explains history and politics to half a million followers. The Russian Revolution is in high range of popularity. Why are there so many viewers and what does this say about teaching history?

The post Wissen2go – Teacher-Centered Instruction on YouTube appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/5-2017-25/wissen2go-teacher-centered-instruction-on-youtube/

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Public History with Tweets

This article describes the way in which the commemoration of the First World War’s centenary is dealt with on Twitter and observes how Twitter promotes both public activities with the past and the expertise of public historians online.

The post Public History with Tweets appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/5-2017-24/public-history-with-tweets/

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Socialism Realised

Might the experience of living in a communist regime be useful for the general international public? This is our attempt to answer this question.

The post Socialism Realised appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/5-2017-19/socialism-realised/

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How Should History of One’s Own Country Be Taught?

We can observe great differences in how teachers deal with the history of their own country ("Heimatkunde") in the classroom. Some of them impart the national master narrative. Others present counter-narratives.

The post How Should History of One’s Own Country Be Taught? appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/5-2017-13/how-should-history-of-ones-own-country-be-taught/

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Successful Public History – A Question of Empirical Evidence?

Deutsch

Eine der vielfältigen Aufgaben der Public History ist es, das reichhaltige Angebot geschichtsvermittelnder Produkte in der Öffentlichkeit forschend zu analysieren. Dieses Ziel geht mit dem Anspruch einher, die Vermittlung nicht als eine Einbahnstraße aufzufassen, sondern als wechselseitigen Prozess zu verstehen, der verschiedene Beteiligte miteinschließt und auf kritische Reflexion, Erweiterung des Wissens und Präzisierung von Methoden angelegt ist. Die Frage, ob der Erfolg einer so verstandenen Public History messbar ist, ist bisher selten gestellt worden – nicht zuletzt wegen fehlenden Datenmaterials.

 

 

Messung öffentlicher Teilhabe

Der wechselseitige Prozess von Produktion, Vermittlung und Rezeption lässt sich sowohl mit Ansätzen einer “shared authority“ als auch einer “shared inquiry“ beschreiben. Der Prozess verweist zudem auf die vorhandene große Schnittmenge zwischen Ansätzen, die bisher entweder in der Public History oder der Angewandten Geschichte verortet wurden.[1] Nicht nur aus Sicht der Public History stellt sich hier aber die Frage, wie der Kontakt mit dem Publikum bzw. der Öffentlichkeit überhaupt hergestellt wird und alle Beteiligten aktiv in den Prozess miteinbezogen werden können.

[...]

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/4-2016-18/successful-public-history-evidence/

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