National Socialism: What We Can Learn Today

Some Germans, even in Academia, grow tired of the intense confrontation with the Nazi past. Many historians have stopped exploring it, attributing marginal value to it explaining current developments

The post National Socialism: What We Can Learn Today appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/7-2019-14/nazi-past-present/

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Last Exit Present? “Waldheim’s Waltz”

A documentation about the Waldheim affair in 1986 is an informative presentation of past culture of memory and history. It begs a question: Does it repeat patterns shown in the film?

The post Last Exit Present? “Waldheim’s Waltz” appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/7-2019-4/waldheims-waltz/

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Late Awareness, Vigorous Remembrance: Austria Today

The Austrian memory of Nazi era and Holocaust remain connected to the "victim thesis". Austria may often seem unteachable, but several institutions are promoting a critical culture of remembrance.

The post Late Awareness, Vigorous Remembrance: Austria Today appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-38/nazi-remembrance-austria-today/

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The World of Yesterday is not the World of Today

The rise of right-wing populists and the brutalization of public space that they pursued recalls Stefan Zweig's narration of the years predating this year’s commemorative years 1918 and 1938.

The post The World of Yesterday is not the World of Today appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-31/world-of-yesterday-not-today/

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The Force of Fiction

...to understand the past differently: These are some of the forces of fiction. It also reminds us that reality never speaks for itself; the narrative choices and the language used are not neutral.

The post The Force of Fiction appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-5/the-force-of-fiction/

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The Cape Town Holocaust Centre and South Africa

The Cape Town Holocaust Centre is the first such centre in South Africa. At its inception in 1999, its founders considered not only what Cape Town and South Africa could learn about the Holocaust from it, but also what the Centre could contribute to the country in coming to terms with South Africa’s past.

The post The Cape Town Holocaust Centre and South Africa appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-5/cape-town-holocaust-centre/

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Reenactment special: Enterprise Reichspark

With "Enterprise Reichspark", a famous youngish German comedian has once again triggered a debate about fake or reality. Is the project of a historical theme park on National Socialism possible or is it even real?

The post Reenactment special: Enterprise Reichspark appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/5-2017-40/reichspark-company/

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Do we need “Dark Public History“?

What does the boom of Dark Tourism mean for public historians and why don't conventional labels such as Dissonant Heritage and Thanatourism include the term Dark Public History?

The post Do we need “Dark Public History“? appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/5-2017-11/do-we-need-dark-public-history/

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Good or bad remembrance? No Stolpersteine in Munich

 

English

No “Stolpersteine”? It has become a societal and political consensus to commemorate the Holocaust and the victims of the NS regime. However, the appropriate format is highly debated.[1] This is also the case in the debate about the Stolpersteine project in Munich. Nonetheless, there is a multifaceted remembrance culture in the capital of Bavaria.

 

 



[...]

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/4-2016-7/good-remembrance-bad-remembrance-no-stolpersteine-in-munich/

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How We Talk About Our History

While the German President, Joachim Gauck, is giving Turkey unsolicited suggestions about how to deal with the Armenian genocide, the German Chancellor, Angela Merkel, in her speech on the 70th anniversary of the

English

While the German President, Joachim Gauck, is giving Turkey unsolicited suggestions about how to deal with the Armenian genocide,[1] the German Chancellor, Angela Merkel, in her speech on the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Dachau concentration camp excludes the remembrance of the Romani people and of the “antisocial” members of society persecuted and murdered during the Nazi regime by not mentioning these groups of victims.[2] This demonstrates that we, in Germany, need Gauck’s suggestions as much as Turkey does, and I accept them and use the term “seizure of power” (Machtergreifung) to think about how we talk about our history.

 

Language usage rules and horror

It seems to me, in my unsystematic, non-representative day-to-day perceptions, that language usage rules for the past are less controversial than those for the present, although every child knows that understanding the past defines the present. An example of how both the understanding of the past and its effects on the present can correspondingly change is provided by the introduction, in 1949, of the fundamental right to asylum in Germany as a consequence of the Holocaust, and its abolition, in 1992, two years after reunification[3] with the GDR. To be brief, I recently read a newspaper article in which the term “seizure of power”, without speech marks, was used in the same way[4] as it had been used up until about 30 years ago. I was appalled. A search with Google revealed that the term is still common usage.

[...]

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/3-2015-19/how-we-talk-about-our-history/

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