FactGrid Cuneiform Project

FactGrid Cuneiform Project

You are not looking at a sheet of cookies or ceramic tiles (in slide 2), these are a group of tablets from the Anatolian Civilizations Museum in Ankara, Turkey. They come from an ancient city called Kanesh, in Kültepe Turkey, in the region of Cappadocia, where more than 20k tablets have been recovered (so far) which date between 1930-1730 B.C. Each of these tablets record the names, places, and notable objects of a world once forgotten to history, but one that we can now restore and preserve through digital tools and methods. But before diving into the digital world of these objects, let’s talk briefly about why these objects are in need of protection and digital preservation.

Why build a multi-modal Linked Data Model for Cuneiform Languages?

There are numerous reasons why building a linked data model will be helpful to many different parties.

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Quelle: https://blog.factgrid.de/archives/2833

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Freimaurer, Illuminaten, Rosenkreuzer, Jesuiten, Alchemisten, Mesmeristen… – die verloren gegangene Bibliothek des letzten illuminatischen Ordensprovinzials

Johann Joachim Christoph Bode starb am 13. Dezember 1793, zwei Stunden vor Mitternacht – wohl an den Folgen der Zahn- und Kieferentzündungen, die ihm seit Jahren mit Anfällen von „Flußfieber und Zahnschmerzen” zu schaffen machten. Damit kam in Gang, was 1787/88 entschieden worden war.

Im Herbst 1787 hatte Bode von Weimar aus wieder einmal Gotha besucht. Seine Arbeit des letzten halben Jahrzehnts lag in Trümmern. Noch im Sommer hatte er sich Paris bemüht, die Illuminaten aus der Schusslinie zu ziehen: „Philaleten“ sollten sie in Zukunft wieder geheim heißen. Seit 1785 war mit „Illuminaten“ kein Geheimnis mehr zu machen. Bayerns Staat hatte alle Geheimorden und insbesondere diesen verboten. Bode hatte dessen ungeachtet als Provinzial „Ioniens“ (Obersachsens) weiterhin Mitglieder aufgenommen.

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Quelle: https://blog.factgrid.de/archives/2835

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14.4.2022: Sich beim Forschen über die Schulter sehen lassen? — Isabella Schwaderers Erkundungen zu den Mitgliedern der Schopenhauergesellschaft


Am Donnerstag, den 14. April 2022, 13:30 (CET) spricht in unserer Serie Erfurter Coffee Talks Isabella Schwaderer über Erfahrungen aus ihrem Projekt “Netzwerkverbindungen in der Schopenhauergesellschaft 1912/1913” — ein Projekt, dessen Recherchen sie im FactGrid datebankgestützt durchführte.

Kann man es riskieren, auf einer Plattform, auf der alle Daten unmittelbar offen zugänglich sind, die eigene gerade erst angefangene Forschung laufen zu lassen? Wie funktioniert die Organisation in einer unter Kollegen international organisierten Plattform? Wie ist die Software in der Handhabung? Was ist praktisch? Was ist unpraktisch? Was gewinnt man — erwartet oder unerwartet?



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Quelle: https://blog.factgrid.de/archives/2778

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Browsing FactGrid with the FactGrid Viewer

FactGrid is a wonderful, free and collaborative resource that the University of Erfurt in Germany has made available to the international historical community. Many potential users are unfortunately put off by its apparent complexity. It is true that an initiation is necessary to exploit all its possibilities. In the future, new tools should make it much easier to use. In the meantime, it is possible to use a certain number of tools that already exist on the platform.

Here I will introduce the FactGrid Viewer tool. A first use of FactGrid is simply to search and browse the database. This is accessible to everyone, without the need to log in. However, the user interface (which is that of Wikidata) is not very engaging. In fact, it looks more like an input mask than a user interface.

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Quelle: https://blog.factgrid.de/archives/2684

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Imagine a Graph Query Helper for Graph Databases

auf Deutsch

FactGrid is a graph database. If you run searches in such a database you should rather not think of a resource filled with tables (of people, places, organizations, documents…) that relate to each other but of something more spatial more geometric.

Think of your own knowledge. You will not be able to give a table of all the names that have a meaning in your knowledge or of all the places related to these names. Our knowledge is more like a web of interrelated objects. Nicolaus Copernicus? Is the man who wrote De revolutionibus. What else do you know?

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Quelle: https://blog.factgrid.de/archives/2636

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9 x FactGrid, Coffee Talk Serie an der Universität Erfurt, 14. April – 9. Juni 2022, Donnerstags 13:30

Die Universität Erfurt lud uns ein, im kommenden Sommersemester eine online Coffee-Talk Serie zum FactGrid als kollaborativer Forschungsplattform zu veranstalten. Neun Themenschwerpunkte haben wir ausgesucht. Die Veranstaltungen sollen kurz und für die Mittagspause zum Hineinschnuppern gemacht sein. Lassen Sie sich inspirieren. Wir bieten eine 15minütige Erkundung mit jeweils offener Fragerunde.

Das Link zur Veranstaltung erhalten Sie für eine Mail an olaf.simons@uni-erfurt.de


14.

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Quelle: https://blog.factgrid.de/archives/2571

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Twenty years on tour: The Velten Theatre Company’s journeys from 1693 to 1712

This may come as a postscript to the previous or as a sneak preview of upcoming projects that will deal with theatre and its history. An interesting topic with all the networks of actors knitting their personal ties in ever changing ensembles of travelling companies that visit cities and courts, of emerging houses with standing ensembles, of authors, of plays and of various roles – and then again of actors who would play certain types in various plays…

The following itinerary follows one of these groups, the so called Hochdeutsche Hofcomödianten or the Velten Company, named after the Veltens, a couple who were the directors between 1670s and 1712.

The image catches all the journeys this group took between 1693 and 1712, the years when Catharina Elisabeth Velten was the company’s director. The FactGrid viewer gives the list of the known stays as Günther Hansen noted them in his Formen der Commedia dell’ Arte in Deutschland (1968), p. 269.

The image is interesting as it captures a structural characteristic of the itineraries which theatre companies were likely to produce back in the 17th and 18th centuries.

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Quelle: https://blog.factgrid.de/archives/2559

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How to map itineraries on FactGrid — and Robinson Crusoe’s eight voyages

William Taylor’s typesetter was reading Crusoe’s history with full attention. That is why he stumbled over that date which the manuscript gave him for his page 46. 1659, “the same Day eight Year that I went from my Father and Mother at Hull”. Crusoe had left his parents in 1661, so he had stated on 7. Should that have been 1651? Or should it now be 1669? There as apparently no time to waste. He skipped the problem and left two blanks.

First edition of Robinson Crusoe, 1719, omitted dates on p.

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Quelle: https://blog.factgrid.de/archives/2475

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Paris to download

PARIS TO DOWNLOAD  comes with a double purpose: it is first designed to provide a dataset for historians to download with one simple click. Click the image below and an SPARQL query will bring the adresses of Paris c. 1830 onto a modern map.

Paris to download download query

Move your cursor to the right margin and you will get the menu that allows you to download the raw data behind this visualisation to your computer. TSV (or CSV) is the practical format here, ready to bridge with copy and paste into any spreadsheet. The download will come with the geographic coordinates and the address names, CC0-licensed and ready to use in any software environment of your choice …

… This might, however, not be the most interesting use you can make of this data set. It might be far more attractive to create your own visualisations here on FactGrid with information you can put on any of the items underneath the visualisation. You will need an account to augment information on this data set and we are eager to open these accounts to all researchers working on historical Paris.

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Quelle: https://blog.factgrid.de/archives/2333

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A Quarter of a Million Items on FactGrid – just a brief reflection

Germany’s national author Johann Wolfgang von Goethe called it a “masquerade in red and white”, but was himself a member (just as he became a member of the Illuminati a little bit later; it made sense to join such organisations and to know from within what they were all about). Freemasonry was in its most idealistic terms an updated edition of the brotherhood of men united under a simple and strikingly anti aristocratic system: the system of the old craft guilds. With their three degrees of apprentice, fellow and master there was no room for privilege of birth. German masonry evolved from the late 1730’s through the 1750’s principally as a system of four degrees, with Scots Master at the apex and the development did not stop there. The chivalric degrees of the 1760’s and 1770’s gave way to increasingly complex systems, overgrowing this initial construct. These high-degree systems claimed roots in the middle ages if not deeper pasts, synthesising Christianity with alchemy, magic, and theosophy. Masonic entrepreneurs travelled through Europe selling secrets which they would convey in extraordinary lodges. What they offered would have been considered heresies only a generation before, and now became a market of esotericism – a market that turned the masonic world into its first framework and distributor. The Strict Observance or Order of the Temple, the masonic high-grade-system founded by Carl Gotthelf von Hund und Altengrotkau in Germany in 1751 was the biggest player on this stage in central Europe – the system of red and white, the colours of the Knights Templars.



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Quelle: https://blog.factgrid.de/archives/2231

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