Historical Consciousness, Fake News, and the Other

Seldom does a day go past since the election of Donald Trump as President of the United States without reports of "alternative facts" and "fake news". This presents both a problem and an opportunity for history educators.

The post Historical Consciousness, Fake News, and the Other appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/5-2017-19/historical-consciousness-fake-news-and-the-other/

Weiterlesen

The ‘Burden of History’ and Controversial Issues

Issue: Educational Content. In Greece we tend to have rather “passionate debates over the national past” than about history education as a whole. Thus, discussion about the methodology of teaching history has developed...

The post The ‘Burden of History’ and Controversial Issues appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/5-2017-12/controversial-issues/

Weiterlesen

In Search of Narrative Plausibility

How shall we articulate a concept of plausibility of historical narratives as a way to assess their adequacy? Jörn Rüsen offers a starting point with his definition of 'Triftigkeit'.

The post In Search of Narrative Plausibility appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/1-2013-9/4-2016-41/in-search-of-narrative-plausibility/

Weiterlesen

A History/Memory Matrix for History Education

 

English

A new matrix? What is the role of state-based history education in open, democratic societies, in respect to the memories that arise from the collective phenomena of war, oppression, displacement, injustice, trauma, nation building, or, indeed, everyday life? On what grounds do the interventions of school history rest? Why not simply accept “spontaneous” community memory, family myth, commercially produced narratives (e.g., Hollywood cinema) or other state-sponsored memories (e.g., national commemorations) that contribute to people’s understandings of the past?

[...]

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/4-2016-6/a-historymemory-matrix-for-history-education/

Weiterlesen

Why Historical Narrative Matters?

Imagine you are in school and asked to write down, in a page or two, the history of your country, your nation or your homeland (patris) as you know it. While this task may sound trivial, it tells us some important facets of people’s ability to use knowledge of the past …

English

 

Imagine you are in school and asked to write down, in a page or two, the history of your country, your nation or your homeland (patria) as you know it. While this task may sound trivial, it tells us some important facets of people’s ability to use knowledge of the past for constructing a meaningful historical narrative.[1]

 

 

A bunch of “stuff” that needs to be remembered

From a practical, pedagogical standpoint, historical narratives matter for at least three reasons:

  1. Historical narratives represent the linguistic and structural form with which it becomes possible for people to organize the “course of time” in a coherent way, thus giving everyday life a temporal frame and matrix of historical orientation.
  2. Historical narratives serve to establish the identity of their authors and their audience. Whether the historical narrative is from the family, the school or the community, it comprises a continuous temporal experience, from the past to the present, making it possible for people to situate themselves – individually and collectively – in reference to others in the course of time.
  3. Historical narratives give people reasons for action. Although a historical narrative is primarily aimed at making sense of past realities, its purpose is to orient life in time in a way which confers upon past actualities a possible future perspective. As such, historical narratives serve to define an imaginable course of actions for individuals and groups guided by the agency of historical knowledge and memory.[2]

This narrative approach to history departs significantly from what typically captures media headlines in my country: “Canada’s failing history.” For the most past, studies in the field of history education have traditionally been concerned with what students know (or don’t know) about the past in relation to canonical knowledge and prescribed curriculum expectations. Annual exams and recurring surveys of young people’s historical knowledge dominate public debate and fuel “history wars.” Unfortunately, These “tests” tell us very little about the significant aspects and specific realities of the past that students acquire, internalize, and use to orient their life and make sense of their world. Years of schoolings and standardized testing have conditioned students – and adults – to believe that history is about a bunch of “stuff” that needs to be remembered or alternatively retrieved instantly from the Internet.

Historical narrative and consciousness

But historical narratives are more complex than aggregated bits of “stuff” and do not emerge spontaneously. They are developed gradually over the course of time as a result of an internalization process by which “individuals acquire beliefs, attitudes, or behavioral regulations from external sources”[3] and progressively transform those external regulations into their personal “historical consciousness.” First devised by German scholars decades ago, and still relatively new to North American scholarship, the concept of historical consciousness goes beyond the accumulation of historical knowledge in memory. It takes into account the mental reconstruction and appropriation of historical information and experiences – acquired at home, in the community, in school, and in popular culture – that are brought into the mental household of an individual.[4] This concept involves a complex process of combining the past, the present, and the envisioned future into meaningful and sense-bearing time. For German historian Jörn Rüsen, historical consciousness serves the reflexive and practical function of orienting our life in time, thus offering narrative visions – big pictures – to guide our contemporary actions and moral behaviors in reference to a usable past.[5]

Students’ history knowledge

If, as French philosopher Paul Ricoeur contends, “time becomes human time to the extent that it is organized after the manner of a narrative,”[6] then we have to be far more attentive to the various narratives that students acquire and tell. Studies, and including our ones, suggest that young people tend to develop “simplified narratives” of the past which, in the words of Denis Shemilt, are “event-space” changes separated by long periods of quiescence in which nothing happens.[7] Students typically compress the collective past into a limited series of historical happenings as if history was like a volcano “occasionally convulsed by random explosions.”[8] These narrative simplifications of the collective past often develop very early in life and can prove to be very robust because they act as “heuristics” and mental frameworks for structuring new learning. So unless these simplified narratives are problematized in school, young people’s historical consciousness is unlikely to be transformed by formal history education alone.
In fact, in their intergenerational study assessing young Americans’ historical consciousness, Wineburg et al. discovered that by restricting our notions of history to the official knowledge of the state-sponsored curriculum, we completely escape the powerful external forces that permeate the historical narratives acquired by today’s youth. In their view, this “cultural Curriculum” can prove to be “more powerful in shaping young people’s ideas about the past than the mountains of textbooks that continue to occupy historians’ and educators’ attention.”[9]

Challenging students’ historical narratives

Today, most teachers are aware of the theory of constructivism and the need to consider the learner’s prior knowledge. But students are rarely assessed on their own historical narratives of the collective past. Rather, teachers typically designed assessment tools meant to gather information on the various learning expectations of the curriculum that students are supposed to master. As a result, students in countries like Canada have no pedagogically-structured opportunity in school to express and confront their pre-conceived knowledge and simplified stories acquired from the “real-life” cultural curriculum and that they bring to formal classroom learning.

As a history educator, I consider it important that we challenge students’ own historical narratives. If school is to play a significant role in shaping the education of young citizens, I believe it must find new ways to engage and make more complex their narrative visions of the past – to provide them with multifaceted “big Pictures” of the past. One way to do so is precisely to invite them to write their own stories of the past, as they know it. Failing to do so will deprive educators of one of the most fundamental means that people use to make sense of the past for contemporary meaning-making.[10]

____________________

Literature

  • Bruner, Jerome, ‘Narrative and paradigmatic modes of thought,’ in Elliot Eisner (ed.), ‘Learning and Teaching the ways of knowing,’ Chicago: University of Chicago Press 1985, p. 97-115.
  • Carr, David, ‘Time, narrative and history,’ Indiana: Indiana University Press 1986.
  • Ricoeur, Paul, ‘Time and narrative,’ 2 vols, Chicago: Univerity of Chicago Press 1984.

External links

  • Centre for the Study of Historical Consciousness. The University of British Columbia: http://www.cshc.ubc.ca (last accessed 30.03.2015).
  • Historical Encounters, Journal of historical consciousness, historical culture and history education: http://hej.hermes-history.net (last accessed 30.03.2015).

____________________

[1] The author would like to thank doctoral student Raphaël Gani (rgani011@uottawa.ca) for his insightful comments and feedback on drafts of this article.
[2] J. H. Liu, & D. J. Hilton, “How the Past Weighs on the Present: Social Representations of History and Their Role in Identity Politics,” The British Journal of Social Psychology, 44(2005), 537–556.
[3] W. Grolnick, E. Deci and R. Ryan, “Internalization within the family: The self-determination theory perspective” as quoted in James Wertsch, Voices of collective remembering (New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 2002), 121.
[4] See P. Seixas (ed.), “Theorizing historical consciousness” (Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press, 2004); J. Rüsen, “History: Narration, interpretation, orientation” (New York, NY: Berghahn Books, 2005); and J. Létourneau, Je me souviens ? Le passé du Québec dans la conscience de sa jeunesse (Montréal, QC: Fides 2014).
[5] Rüsen, History: Narration, interpretation, orientation, 25.
[6] Ricoeur, Time and Narrative, 3.
[7] See B. VanSledright and J. Brophy, “Storytelling, imagination, and fanciful elaboration in children’s historical reconstructions,” American Educational Research Journal, 29 (1992), 837-859; K. Barton, “Narrative simplifications in elementary students’ historical thinking,” in J. Brophy (ed.), “Advances in Research on Teaching,” vol. 6 (Greenwich, CT: JAI Press, 1996), 51-84; D. Shemilt, “The Caliph’s Coin: The currency of narrative frameworks in history teaching,” in P. Seixas, P. Stearns, and S. Wineburg (eds.), “Knowing and teaching history: National and international perspectives” (New York, NY: New York University Press, 2000), 83-101; S. Lévesque, J. Létourneau, and R. Gani. “A Giant with Clay Feet: Québec Students and Their Historical Consciousness of the Nation.” International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research 11, 2 (2013); M. Robichaud, “L’histoire de l’Acadie telle que racontée par les jeunes francophones du Nouveau-Brunswick : construction et déconstruction d’un récit historique,” Acadiensis 40, 2 (2011): 33-69 ; and J. Létourneau and S. Moisan, “Mémoire et récit de l’aventure historique du Québec chez les jeunes Québécois d’héritage canadien-français: coup de sonde, amorce d’analyse des résultats, questionnement,” Canadian Historical Review 84, 2 (2004): 325-357.
[8] D. Shemilt, “History 13-16: Evaluation Study” (Edinburgh, UK: Holmes McDougall, 1980), 35.
[9] S. Wineburg, S. Mosborg, D. Porat, and A. Duncan, “Forrest Gump and the future of teaching history,” Phi Delta Kappan (November 2007), 176.
[10] On the importance of the narrative structure for the mind and history, see, for example, B. Hardy, “Narrative as a primary act of mind,” in M. Meek, A. Warlow, and G. Barton, The Cool Web: The pattern of children’s reading (London, UK: Bodley Hean, 1977), 135-141; P. Ricoeur, Time and Narrative, vol. I (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1983); D. Carr, Time, Narrative and History (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1986); and J. Bruner, “Narratives and paradigmatic modes of thought,” in E. Eisner (ed.), Learning and teaching the ways of knowing (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1985), 97-115.

____________________
Image Credits
© Lesekreis. Wikimedia Commons (public Domain).
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ALibrary_Walk_6.JPG

Recommended Citation
Levesque, Stéphane: Why historical narrative matters? Challenging the stories of the past. In: Public History Weekly 2 (2015) 11, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-3819.

Copyright (c) 2015 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

 

Deutsch

 

Stellen Sie sich vor, Sie seien in der Schule und würden gebeten, auf ein bis zwei Seiten die Geschichte Ihres Landes, Ihrer Nation oder Ihrer Heimat (patria) so niederzuschreiben, wie Sie diese kennen. Während diese Aufgabe vielleicht trivial klingt, zeigt uns das Resultat doch wichtige Facetten der individuellen Fähigkeit, das Wissen über die Vergangenheit in ein sinnvolles historisches Narrativ zu überführen.[1]

 

 

Ein Bündel “Zeugs”, das man sich merken muss

Von einem praktischen, pädagogischen Standpunkt aus betrachtet, sind historische Narrative aus mindestens drei Gründen bedeutsam:

  1. Historische Narrative repräsentieren die linguistische und strukturelle Form, die es uns ermöglicht, den “Verlauf der Zeit” in einer kohärenten Weise darzustellen, was wiederum dem Alltag einen zeitlichen Rahmen und eine Matrix historischer Orientierung verleiht.
  2. Historische Narrative dienen der Herausbildung einer Identität für ihre VerfasserInnen und deren Publikum. Ob es sich um das historische Narrativ einer Familie, einer Schule oder einer Gemeinde handelt: Es umfasst eine fortlaufende Zeiterfahrung, die sich von der Vergangenheit bis zur Gegenwart erstreckt. Damit ermöglichen Narrative den Menschen, sich individuell und kollektiv in Bezug zu anderen und der fortschreitenden Zeit zu situieren.
  3. Historische Narrative liefern eine Handlungsbegründung. Obwohl ein historisches Narrativ vorwiegend darauf abzielt, der vergangenen Wirklichkeit Sinn zu verleihen, ist sein Zweck doch vor allem, in einer Art und Weise der eigenen Existenz in der Zeit Orientierung zu vermitteln, die der vergangenen Wirklichkeit eine mögliche zukünftige Perspektive gewährt. Als solche dienen historische Narrative Personen und Gruppen dazu, vorstellbare Handlungsmöglichkeiten zu definieren vermittels historischen Wissens und Erinnerung.[2]

Dieser narrative Ansatz unterscheidet sich erheblich von dem, was als typische Überschrift in den Medien meines Landes zu lesen ist: “Kanada versagt in Geschichte”. In der Vergangenheit waren die meisten Studien auf dem Gebiet der Geschichtsdidaktik traditionellerweise darüber besorgt, was SchülerInnen von der Vergangenheit wissen (oder nicht wissen). Bezugsgröße war dabei das kanonische Wissen und die in Lehrplänen vorgeschriebenen Anforderungen. Jährliche Prüfungen und wiederkehrende Überprüfungen des historischen Wissens junger Leute dominieren den Diskurs in der Öffentlichkeit und befeuern “Geschichtskriege”. Leider berichten uns diese “Tests” sehr wenig über die wichtigsten Aspekte und die spezifischen Vorstellungen von der Vergangenheit, die von den SchülerInnen erworben, verinnerlicht und angewendet werden, um sich im Leben zu orientieren und ihrer Welt Sinn zu verleihen. Jahrelange Beschulung und standardisierte Testung hat die SchülerInnen – und die Erwachsenen – dazu konditioniert zu glauben, dass Geschichte ein Bündel von “Zeugs” ist, das man sich merken muss oder alternativ sofort aus dem Internet abrufen kann.

Historisches Narrativ und Bewusstsein

Historische Narrative sind jedoch komplexer als zusammengewürfelte Häppchen von “Zeugs” und entstehen nicht spontan. Sie werden nach und nach als Folge eines Internalisierungsprozesses erworben, in dem sich “Individuen Überzeugungen, Einstellungen oder Verhaltensweisen von externen Einflüssen aneignen”[3] und nach und nach aus diesen externen Vorgaben in ihrer persönlichen Entwicklung ein “Geschichtsbewusstsein” ausbilden. Dieses wurde bereits vor Jahrzehnten von deutschen WissenschaftlerInnen beschrieben, ist aber im nordamerikanischen Wissenschaftsdiskurs noch immer vergleichsweise neu. Das Konzept des Geschichtsbewusstseins geht über die Anhäufung historischen Wissens im Gedächtnis hinaus. Es berücksichtigt die mentale Verarbeitung und die Aneignung historischen Wissens und Erfahrungen – erworben im häuslichen Umfeld, im öffentlichen Leben, in der Schule oder im Zuge der Populärkultur – die nun in den mentalen Haushalt des Individuums mit eingebracht werden.[4] Dieses Konzept umfasst einen komplexen Prozess der Kombination von Vergangenheit, Gegenwart und vorgestellter Zukunft in eine sinnvolle und sinnführende Vorstellung von Zeit. Für Jörn Rüsen dient Geschichtsbewusstsein der reflexiven und angewendeten Funktion, das Leben hinsichtlich der Zeit zu orientieren. Es bietet damit narrative Vorstellungen – das große Ganze –, um gegenwärtige Handlungsweisen und moralische Verhaltensweisen mit Bezug auf eine dafür nutzbare Vergangenheit anzuleiten.[5]

Schülervorstellungen von Geschichte

Wenn, wie der französische Philosoph Paul Ricoeur behauptet, “Zeit in dem Maße zur menschlichen Zeit wird, wie sie im Sinne einer Erzählung organisiert wird”,[6] dann müssen wir weit mehr Aufmerksamkeit den verschiedenen Narrativen widmen, die SchülerInnen entwickeln und erzählen. Studien, einschließlich unserer, deuten darauf hin, dass junge Menschen dazu neigen, “vereinfachte Narrative” der Vergangenheit zu entwickeln, die, in den Worten von Denis Shemilt, Veränderungen in einem “Ereignisraum” zwischen langen Ruheperioden darstellen, in denen nichts passiert.[7] In der Regel komprimieren SchülerInnen die kollektive Vergangenheit in eine limitierte Abfolge von historischen Ereignissen, als wäre die Geschichte ein Vulkan, der “gelegentlich durch zufällige Explosionen ausbricht”.[8] Diese vereinfachten Narrative der kollektiven Vergangenheit entwickeln sich oftmals sehr früh im Leben und erweisen sich als äußerst robust, da sie als “heuristische” und mentale Strukturen das neu Gelernte ordnen. Falls diese vereinfachten Narrative nicht in der Schule problematisiert werden, ist es sehr unwahrscheinlich, dass sich das Geschichtsbewusstsein junger Menschen durch formalen Geschichtsunterricht allein verändern lässt.
In der Tat zeigen Wineburg et al. in ihrer generationsübergreifenden Studie zum Geschichtsbewusstsein junger AmerikanerInnen, dass durch die Beschränkung unserer Vorstellungen von Geschichte auf das offiziell bestätigte Wissen der Lehrplaninhalte, uns die mächtigen äußeren Einflüsse völlig entgehen, die die historischen Narrative der heutigen Jugend beeinflussen. Ihrer Meinung nach könnte sich dieser “kulturelle Lehrplan” als “einflussreicher bei der Herausbildung von Vorstellungen über die Vergangenheit von jungen Leuten herausstellen als die Berge von Schulbüchern, die weiterhin die Aufmerksamkeit von Historikern und Pädagogen besetzen.”[9]

Förderung der historischen Narrative bei SchülerInnen

Heutzutage sind sich die meisten Lehrpersonen der Theorie des Konstruktivismus bewusst und wissen um die Notwendigkeit, das Vorwissen der Lernenden zu berücksichtigen. Allerdings werden bei den Lernenden kaum deren eigenen historischen Narrative über die kollektive Vergangenheit bewertet. Sie werden vielmehr regelmäßig von ihren Lehrpersonen mit eigens dafür entwickelten Bewertungsinstrumenten konfrontiert, die der Überprüfung der Lernerwartungen des Lehrplans dienen, deren Meisterung von den Lernenden erwartet wird. Aus diesem Grund haben SchülerInnen in Ländern wie Kanada keine pädagogisch strukturierte Möglichkeit, sich mit ihrem vorgefassten Wissen und ihren einfachen Narrativen, die sie im kulturellen Curriculum des Alltags erworben haben, im Rahmen schulischen Lernens auseinanderzusetzen.

Als Geschichtsdidaktiker halte ich es für wichtig, von den SchülerInnen eine Auseinandersetzung mit ihren eigenen historischen Narrativen zu verlangen. Wenn die Schule eine bedeutende Rolle bei der Bildung junger BürgerInnen spielen soll, dann muss sie neue Wege finden, sich mit den narrativen Vorstellungen der Jugendlichen auseinander zu setzen und diese komplexer zu machen – um sie dadurch mit vielfältigen “Gesamtsichten” der Vergangenheit zu versorgen. Eine Möglichkeit wäre eben, sie dazu zu ermutigen, ihre eigenen Narrative über die Vergangenheit, so wie sie sie kennen, zu schreiben. Dies zu versäumen, entzieht den Lehrpersonen eines der grundlegendsten Mittel, mit dem Menschen für gewöhnlich der Vergangenheit Sinn verleihen, um sich zur Meinungsbildung in der Gegenwart zu befähigen.[10]

____________________

Literatur

  • Bruner, Jerome: Narrative and paradigmatic modes of thought, in: Elliot Eisner (Hrsg.): Learning and Teaching the ways of knowing. Chicago, S. 97-115.
  • Carr, David: Time, narrative and history. Indiana 1986.
  • Ricoeur, Paul: Time and narrative, 2 Bd., Chicago 1984.

Externe Links

  • Centre for the Study of Historical Consciousness. The University of British Columbia: http://www.cshc.ubc.ca (last accessed 30.03.2015).
  • Historical Encounters, Journal of historical consciousness, historical culture and history education: http://hej.hermes-history.net (last accessed 30.03.2015).

____________________

[1] Der Autor dankt dem Doktoranden Raphaël Gani (rgani011@uottawa.ca) für seine aufschlussreichen Kommentare und sein Feedback zu Entwürfen dieses Beitrages.
[2] J. H. Liu, D. J. Hilton: How the Past Weighs on the Present: Social Representations of History and Their Role in Identity Politics. In: The British Journal of Social Psychology 44 (2005), S. 537-556.
[3] W. Grolnick, E. Deci, R. Ryan: Internalization within the family: The self-determination theory perspective as quoted in James Wertsch, Voices of collective remembering. New York 2002, S. 121.
[4] Vgl. P. Seixas (Hrsg.): Theorizing historical consciousness. Toronto 2004; J. Rüsen: History: Narration, interpretation, orientation. New York 2005 und J. Létourneau: Je me souviens? Le passé du Québec dans la conscience de sa jeunesse. Montréal 2014.
[5] Rüsen, History: Narration, interpretation, orientation, S. 25.
[6] Ricoeur, Time and Narrative, S. 3.
[7] Vgl. B. VanSledright / J. Brophy: Storytelling, imagination, and fanciful elaboration in children’s historical reconstructions. In: American Educational Research Journal 29 (1992), S. 837-859; K. Barton: Narrative simplifications in elementary students’ historical thinking. In: J. Brophy (Hrsg.): Advances in Research on Teaching, Ausg. 6. Greenwich 1996, S. 51-84; D. Shemilt: The Caliph’s Coin: The currency of narrative frameworks in history teaching. In: P. Seixas, P. Stearns / S. Wineburg (Hrsg.): Knowing and teaching history: National and international perspectives. New York 2000, S. 83-101; S. Lévesque / J. Létourneau / R. Gani: A Giant with Clay Feet: Québec Students and Their Historical Consciousness of the Nation. In: International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research 11 (2013) 2; M. Robichaud: L’histoire de l’Acadie telle que racontée par les jeunes francophones du Nouveau-Brunswick: construction et déconstruction d’un récit historique. In : Acadiensis 40 (2011) 2, S. 33-69; und J. Létourneau / S. Moisan: Mémoire et récit de l’aventure historique du Québec chez les jeunes Québécois d’héritage canadien-français: coup de sonde, amorce d’analyse des résultats, questionnement. In: Canadian Historical Review 84 (2004) 2, S. 325-357.
[8] D. Shemilt: History 13-16: Evaluation Study. Edinburgh 1980, S. 35.
[9] S. Wineburg / S. Mosborg / D. Porat / A. Duncan: Forrest Gump and the future of teaching history. In: Phi Delta Kappan, Ausg. November 2007, S. 176.
[10] Zur Bedeutung der narrativen Struktur von Erinnerung und Geschichte vgl. z.B. B. Hardy: Narrative as a primary act of mind. In: M. Meek / A. Warlow / G. Barton: The Cool Web: The pattern of children’s reading. London 1977, S. 135-141; P. Ricoeur: Time and Narrative Ausg. 1. Chicago 1983; D. Carr: Time, Narrative and History. Bloomington 1986; und J. Bruner: Narratives and paradigmatic modes of thought. In: E. Eisner (Hsrg.): Learning and teaching the ways of knowing. Chicago 1985, S. 97-115.

____________________
Abbildungsnachweis
© Lesekreis. Wikimedia Commons (gemeinfrei).
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ALibrary_Walk_6.JPG

Übersetzung aus dem Englischen
von Marco Zerwas

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Levesque, Stéphane: Was macht historische Narrative bedeutsam? Förderung der geschichtsbezogener Erzählkompetenz. In: Public History Weekly 3 (2015) 11, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-3819.

Copyright (c) 2015 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

 

 

Français

 

Imaginez que vous êtes de retour sur les bancs d’école et qu’on vous demande tout bonnement de raconter, en une page ou deux, l’histoire de votre pays, votre nation ou votre patrie comme vous la savez. Bien que cet exercice de mise en récit du passé peut vous sembler anodine, il n’en demeure pas moins révélateur de la capacité des gens à mobiliser certains savoirs historiques entassés dans la mémoire dans la construction de sens, d’une narration qui lien le passé au présent. [1]

 

 

Un “tas de choses” qu’on doit se rappeler

D’un point de vue pédagogique et pratique, on peut affirmer que les récits historiques revêtent une importance pour au moins trois raisons :

  1. Le récit historique permet d’établir l’identité de son auteur et de son auditoire. L’acte de raconter, qu’il procède de la famille, du milieu scolaire ou de la communauté d’appartenance, permet à l’individu de découvrir et d’établir sa propre identité historique en référence à un groupe, une communauté, un monde temporel qui se présente comme ordonné et dans lequel toutes les composantes du récit trouvent leur place dans la durée. Le récit attribue donc au passé un sens identitaire pour soi et pour les autres.
  2. Le récit historique représente la forme linguistique et structurelle grâce à laquelle il devient possible pour tout individu d’organiser de manière cohérente l’expérience chaotique du temps et ainsi donner un sens aux expériences de vie. C’est donc par la narration que le “temps devient temps humain”.
  3. Le récit historique favorise une mobilisation du passé pour l’action. Bien que le récit historique soit d’abord orienté vers la compréhension des réalités du passé, son but est une actualisation de ce passé dans le monde présent et l’avenir possible. Ainsi, par le récit l’individu peut donner un sens particulier aux dimensions du temps et par là même d’imaginer un avenir personnel et collectif, une sorte “d’horizon d’attente” guidé par une démarche comparative liant le passé au présent. Le récit se fait donc porteur d’une certaine vision de ce que pourrait être l’avenir de l’individu, du groupe, de la société.

Cette approche narrative de l’histoire est fort peu reconnue et considérée dans la compréhension qu’ont les autorités et les médias canadiens de l’apprentissage historique chez les jeunes, affirmant volontiers que ces derniers ne connaissent à peu près rien de l’histoire du Canada. Il est vrai que les études dans le domaine de l’éducation historique ont tradionnellement mis l’emphase sur la maitrise des connaissances et le déficit flagrant d’une certaine culture historique commune chez les élèves. Les résultats d’examens ministériels et de sondages épisodiques fortement publicisés rappellent au public l’ignorance chronique des jeunes et alimentent une sorte de “guerre de l’histoire” (history wars) concernant la “véritable” matière à enseigner dans les écoles.
Malheureusement, tous ces résultats et ces débats publics nous renseignent peu sur la pensée historique des jeunes, sur leur capacité à appréhender, intégrer, organiser et transformer les réalités historiques par l’intellection humaine sous forme de visions narratives; visions servant à orienter leur vie personnelle dans le temps. C’est que l’expérience scolaire des élèves issue d’un curriculum formel et prescrit laisse souvent croire – tant chez les jeunes que les adultes – que l’histoire peut se réduire à un “tas de choses” qu’on apprend dans un programme scolaire, dans les manuels et les cahiers d’exercices qui incarnent ce qu’est l’histoire.

Les récits historiques comme manifestation de la conscience historique

L’élaboration de récits historiques est plus complexe que la maitrise de connaissances brutes et désincarnées issues de programmes scolaires.  En fait, ce serait par le récit que l’apprenant élabore des structures d’explication des réalités passées et présentes qui, de ce fait, deviennent intelligibles, signifiantes et graduellement intériorisées dans sa “conscience historique”.[3] Élaboré par des théoriciens allemands, le concept de conscience historique est encore fort peu connu et utilisé en Amérique du Nord. Mais il s’avère, à mon point de vue, extrêmement utile pour la recherche sur l’apprentissage historique. En effet, la conscience historique va bien au-delà de la maitrise du savoir formel. Car, selon cette approche, les connaissances historiques et les expériences de vie – acquises à la maison, à l’école, dans la communauté et au sein de la culture – sont transformées par l’intellection humaine en véritables histoires personnelles qui donnent sens aux événements, c’est à dire qu’elles donnent une signification particulière à tirer du passé ainsi qu’une direction pour l’avenir.[4] En ce sens, on voit bien que la conscience historique sert à articuler non seulement les dimensions du passé et du présent mais également du passé et de l’avenir permettant à tout individu de s’orienter dans la durée. Pour l’historien allemand Jörn Rüsen, cette conscience historique relève d’une compréhension active et réfléchie des dimensions du temps sous forme narrative qui guide nos actions et nos jugements moraux.[5] Bref, la conscience historique ne peut être réductible à un “tas de choses” issues de la mémoire.

Le savoir historique des jeunes

Si, comme le soutient Paul Ricoeur, le temps devient véritablement “temps humain dans la mesure ou il est articulé de manière narrative”[6] et si ces récits sont bel et bien la manifestation de la conscience historique, il faut donc être plus attentif aux histoires que les jeunes apprennent et nous racontent. Plusieurs études, dont les nôtres, suggèrent que les jeunes développent des récits historiques excessivement simplifiés et réducteurs qui, selon le didacticien Denis Shemilt, sont des “condensés évènementiels” de changements historiques séparés par de longues périodes de silence au cours desquelles rien ne se passe.[7] En fait, les jeunes ont tendance à compresser le temps humain en une série d’événements épisodiques comme si l’histoire ressemblait à un “un volcan qui entre en action lors d’éruptions sporadiques”.[8]
Ces simplifications narratives se développent souvent très tôt dans l’évolution des jeunes et peuvent être extrêmement robustes face au changement car elles servent de schémas pour organiser leurs représentations du passé et d’heuristiques pour structurer l’apprentissage de nouvelles connaissances. On voit bien ici que les récits et les connaissances préalables des jeunes doivent être activées et examinées attentivement si l’on souhaite transformer leurs visions narratives du passé, sans quoi l’éducation risque d’avoir peu d’effet sur la conscience historique des jeunes. En fait, l’étude de Sam Wineburg et de son équipe sur la conscience historique d’adolescents américains démontre qu’en véhiculant une conception strictement curriculaire de l’histoire au sein du système scolaire, les éducateurs et les chercheurs négligent toute une panoplie d’expériences réelles et formatrices provenant de sources sociétales externes à l’école qui affectent sérieusement les représentations historiques des jeunes. Selon eux, ce “curriculum culturel” joue un rôle de premier plan dans l’élaboration des visions historiques des élèves et peut s’avérer “plus puissant que toute une montage de manuels scolaires”.[9]

Complexifier les récits historiques

La plus part des éducateurs canadiens sont au jour des théories dites “constructivistes” et de la nécessité de prendre en compte les connaissances préalables des apprenants. Or, ces derniers sont rarement évalués sur leurs propres représentations narratives du passé collectif. Les éducateurs élaborent plutôt des outils d’analyse diagnostique qui visent à jauger leur niveau de connaissance des objectifs d’apprentissages tirés des programmes d’études. La conséquence est que les jeunes canadiens ne disposent pas de mécanismes au sein du système scolaire leur permettant de raconter et de confronter leurs divers récits historiques acquis au gré d’expériences formatrices provenant du curriculum culturel.

A titre de didacticien, il m’apparaît important, voire nécessaire, de sonder les visions narratives des jeunes qui, trop souvent dans nos sociétés hyper-scolarisées, échappent à la conscience des principaux intéressés, enseignants, élèves, et parents. Précisons que ces visions sont puissantes du fait de leur simplicité et fortement encrés dans leur conscience historique. Dans ces conditions, on comprend pourquoi l’éducation historique doit mieux évaluer, questionner et complexifier les récits que les jeunes apprennent, partagent et utilisent pour s’orienter dans le temps et donner un sens au monde qui les entoure. La classe d’histoire doit devenir un lieu où le curriculum culturel est pris en compte dans l’évaluation des apprenants et le développement de leur conscience historique et citoyenne. Inviter les jeunes à raconter l’histoire de leur société, telle qu’ils la savent, constitue un moyen pratique et efficace de sonder leurs connaissances, leurs visions et leurs représentations signifiantes du passé. En occultant la pensée narrative, on prive les éducateurs d’un des grands modes culturels d’appréhension de la réalité humaine.[10]

 

____________________

Literature

  • Bruner, Jerome, ‘Narrative and paradigmatic modes of thought,’ in Elliot Eisner (ed.), ‘Learning and Teaching the ways of knowing,’ Chicago: University of Chicago Press 1985, p. 97-115.
  • Carr, David, ‘Time, narrative and history,’ Indiana: Indiana University Press 1986.
  • Ricoeur, Paul, ‘Time and narrative,’ 2 vols, Chicago: Univerity of Chicago Press 1984.

Liens externe

  • Centre for the Study of Historical Consciousness. The University of British Columbia: http://www.cshc.ubc.ca (last accessed 30.03.2015).
  • Historical Encounters, Journal of historical consciousness, historical culture and history education: http://hej.hermes-history.net (last accessed 30.03.2015).

____________________

[1] L’auteur voudrait remercier le doctorant Raphaël Gani (rgani011@uottawa.ca) pour ses commentaires judicieux sur l’ébauche de cet article.
[2] J. H. Liu, & D. J. Hilton, “How the Past Weighs on the Present: Social Representations of History and Their Role in Identity Politics,” The British Journal of Social Psychology, 44 (2005), 537–556.
[3] W. Grolnick, E. Deci et R. Ryan, “Internalization within the family: The self-determination theory perspective” dans James Wertsch, Voices of collective remembering (New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 2002), 121.
[4] Voir N. Tutiaux-Guillon & D. Nourrisson (dir.), Identités, mémoires, conscience historique (St-Étienne: Publications de l’Université de St-Étienne, 2003); P. Seixas (dir.), Theorizing historical consciousness (Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press, 2004); J. Rüsen, History: Narration, interpretation, orientation (New York, NY: Berghahn Books, 2005); C. Duquette, “Le rapport entre la pensée historique et la conscience historique: Élaboration d’un modèle d’interaction lors de l’apprentissage de l’histoire chez les élèves de 5e secondaire des écoles francophones du Québec,” thèse de doctorat, Université Laval, 2011; et J. Létourneau, Je me souviens ?  Le passé du Québec dans la conscience de sa jeunesse (Montréal, QC: Fides 2014).
[5] Rüsen, History: Narration, interpretation, orientation, 25.
[6] Paul Ricoeur, Temps et récit, vol.1 (Paris : Editions du Seuil, 1983), 17.
[7] Voir B. VanSledright and J. Brophy, “Storytelling, imagination, and fanciful elaboration in children’s historical reconstructions,” American Educational Research Journal, 29 (1992), 837-859; K. Barton, “Narrative simplifications in elementary students’ historical thinking,” dans J. Brophy (dir.), Advances in Research on Teaching, vol. 6 (Greenwich, CT: JAI Press, 1996), 51-84; D. Shemilt, “The Caliph’s Coin: The currency of narrative frameworks in history teaching,” dans P. Seixas, P. Stearns, and S. Wineburg (dir.), Knowing and teaching history: National and international perspectives (New York, NY: New York University Press, 2000), 83-101;  S. Lévesque, J. Létourneau, and R. Gani. “A Giant with Clay Feet: Québec Students and Their Historical Consciousness of the Nation.” International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research 11, 2 (2013); M. Robichaud, “L’histoire de l’Acadie telle que racontée par les jeunes francophones du Nouveau-Brunswick : construction et déconstruction d’un récit historique,” Acadiensis 40, 2 (2011): 33-69 ; et J. Létourneau and S. Moisan, “Mémoire et récit de l’aventure historique du Québec chez les jeunes Québécois d’héritage canadien-français: coup de sonde, amorce d’analyse des résultats, questionnement,” Canadian Historical Review 84, 2 (2004): 325-357.
[8] D. Shemilt, History 13-16: Evaluation Study (Edinburgh, UK: Holmes McDougall, 1980), 35.
[9] S. Wineburg, S. Mosborg, D. Porat, et A. Duncan, “Forrest Gump and the future of teaching history,” Phi Delta Kappan (November 2007), 176.
[10] Sur l’importance de la structure narrative et de la narration en histoire, voir B. Hardy, “Narrative as a primary act of mind,” dans M. Meek, A. Warlow, et G. Barton, The Cool Web: The pattern of children’s reading (London, UK: Bodley Hean, 1977), 135-141; P. Ricoeur, Temps et récit, 3 vol. (Paris : Editions du Seuil, 1983-1985); D. Carr, Time, Narrative and History (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1986); et J. Bruner, “Narratives and paradigmatic modes of thought,” dans E. Eisner (dir.), Learning and teaching the ways of knowing (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1985), 97-115.

____________________

Crédits Illustration
© Lesekreis. Wikimedia Commons (public Domain).
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ALibrary_Walk_6.JPG

Citation recommandée
Levesque, Stéphane: Quelle est l’importance des récits historiques? Complexifier les histoires que nous racontent les jeunes. In: Public History Weekly 3 (2015) 11, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-3819.

Copyright (c) 2014 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

 


The post Why Historical Narrative Matters? appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/3-2015-11/why-historical-narrative-matters/

Weiterlesen

Between Memory Recall and Historical Consciousness: Implications for Education

 

“Honestly, I don’t recall anything. But I think there were lots of troubles between French and English Canadians… ” says one 17 year old student when asked to recount the history of Canada.

English

 

“Honestly, I don’t recall anything. But I think there were lots of troubles between French and English Canadians… ” says one 17 year old student when asked to recount the history of Canada. Like many of her counterparts, Annie was initially baffled by the task of writing a historical narrative of Canada because, as she put it, “I don’t recall anything”. Public surveys periodically remind Canadians of the catastrophic state of historical knowledge among youth. “Canada is failing history,” as one newspaper even put it.[1]

 

Historical consciousness without knowledge?

Yet, Annie knew significantly more than initially thought. Not only was she able to write a simplified narrative of Canadian history, but the orientation of her story reveals important aspects of her historical consciousness. Both memory and historical consciousness have to do with the past. But there are subtle differences between the two. Memory is the residue of life, says Nora, because it is subject to the mental dialectic of “remembering and forgetting, unconscious of its successive deformations”.[2] Historical consciousness, on the other hand, is the mental reconstruction and appropriation of historical information and experiences that are brought into the mental household of an individual. While memory nourishes the recollection of past experiences, historical consciousness involves a complex process of combining the past, the present, and the envisioned future into meaningful and sense-bearing time.[3] It serves the reflexive and practical function of orienting life in time, thus guiding our contemporary actions and moral behaviours in reference to past actualities. It is with the help of historical consciousness that Annie was able to confess her poor memory but soon after recount the history of Canada as “lots of troubles between French and English Canadians”. In this short sentence Annie offers a synthesized vision of Canadian history as defined by the historic tensions between the two founding European nations: the French and the British.

Grand narratives and historical consciousness

In the logic of her story, the development of Canada has not followed distinctive progress toward nation-building as promoted by the Canadian grand narrative. On the contrary, Annie’s vision is less confident and characterized by the duality of the country. Interestingly, recent studies with Canadians reveal a similar pattern.[4] Even if people lament their poor knowledge of history, they can, nonetheless, offer relatively coherent historical narratives which, in the case of French Canadians, frequently highlight their struggles for survival. Such findings expose another crucial aspect of historical consciousness: an awareness of the temporal dimension of the self (personal identity). By means of historical consciousness an individual can expend and complexify his or her personal experience and belong to a larger temporal framework. Telling a story of a national community is not just a mere act of recounting past events, but one that is informed by a certain kind of “cultural knowledge” bearing information significant to both the community and the self. In the case of Annie’s simplified narrative, the reference to “lots of troubles between French and English Canadians” are not banal. It makes it possible to inscribe her narrative vision of Canada into a wider socio-temporal dimension – one shared by many generations of French Canadians.

Skills of historical learning

But what has all this to do with education? At least two central elements of historical consciousness should interest educators: narrative vision and historical thinking.[5] First, the study of historical consciousness makes it possible to understand how people use the past. For Rüsen, the ability to create a narrative vision is not optional to human life. The mental operations by which individuals make sense of the world lie in narration. This is to say that all learners possess some more-or-less coherent historical narratives of their community. These “broad pictures” of the past serve to orient their life so any attempt to educate learners should take into account the prior knowledge that they bring to school. In brief, Annie’s narrative vision of Canadian history informs her views of the world and operates as the backdrop against which all new knowledge will be acquired. This forces us, as educators, to consider some key questions: what stories of the past do students bring to school? What cultural tools to they use to shape their visions of history? In what ways to these tools affect their conceptions of the past, the present, and the future?

Ability to deconstruct and think historically

Second, the development of historical consciousness is not an “all-or-nothing” process. In our studies, we found that learners do not necessarily draw on or create critical historical narratives, even at the university level, but often approach the past opportunistically with pre-existing narrative ideas and misconceptions.[6] I believe that the work of educators is to expend their broad pictures of the past through historical thinking. This disciplinary process of thinking critically about the past offers a scholastic toolkit for making sense of what historical narrative are and how they are constructed and used. For decades, scholars have been conceptualizing ways of thinking historically through meta-historical concepts and heuristics.[7] They have proclaimed that beyond factual knowledge and grand narratives, learners also need a “disciplinary form of knowledge” to evaluate historical claims through such questions as: What group(s) am I part of? Why is this story important to me? Should I believe it? On what ground? What evidence do we have? Perhaps in the past it was sufficient for learners to recall memory information of the community. But in today’s complex, rapidly-changing world, this approach to history is no longer sufficient. We need an educated citizenry capable of orienting themselves in time with critical, usable narrative visions of their world.

 

____________________

 

Literature

  • Carr, D. (1986). Time, Narrative, and History. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.
  • Rüsen, Jörn. (2005). History: Narration, Interpretation, Orientation. New York, NY: Berghahn Books.
  • Wertsch, J. (2002). Voices of Collective Remembering. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

External links

____________________

[1] M. Chalifoux and J.D.M. Stewart, “Canada is failing history.” The Globe and Mail. (June 16, 2009). Available: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/canada-is-failing-history/article4276621/ (last accessed 22.9.2014).
[2] P. Nora, “Between Memory and History: Les lieux de mémoire,” Représentations, 26 (Spring 1989): 8-9.
[3] J. Rüsen, History: Narration, Interpretation, Orientation. New York, NY: Berghahn Books (2005).
[4] See S. Lévesque, J.P. Croteau, and R. Gani, “La conscience historique de jeunes Franco-Ontariens d’Ottawa: histoire et sentiment d’appartenance,” Historical Studies in Education (forthcoming), 24 p.; J. Létourneau, Si je me souviens? Le passé du Québec dans la conscience de sa jeunesse. Anjou, QC: Fides (2014); S. Lévesque, J. Létourneau, and R. Gani. “A Giant with Clay Feet: Québec Students and Their Historical Consciousness of the Nation.” International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research 11, 2 (2013): R. Gani, “L’histoire nationale dans ses grandes lignes: enquête internationale sur la conscience historique,” Canadian Issues, (Spring 2012): 156‐72; M. Robichaud, “L’histoire de l’Acadie telle que racontée par les jeunes francophones du Nouveau-Brunswick : construction et déconstruction d’un récit historique,” Acadiensis 40, 2 (2011): 33-69 ; and J. Létourneau and S. Moisan, “Mémoire et récit de l’aventure historique du Québec chez les jeunes Québécois d’héritage canadien-français: coup de sonde, amorce d’analyse des résultats, questionnement,” Canadian Historical Review 84, 2 (2004): 325-357.
[5] For an extensive discussion on related challenges for history education, see P. Lee, “‘Walking backwards into tomorrow’: Historical consciousness and understanding history, International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research 7 (2002): 1-46; and N. Tutiaux-Guillon, “L’histoire enseignée entre coutume disciplinaire et formation de la conscience historique: l’exemple français,” In N. Tutiaux-Guillon and D. Nourisson (Eds.), Identités, mémoires, conscience historique. St-Étienne, FR: Publications de l’Université St-Étienne (2003), 27-39.
[6] See, “‘Walking backwards into tomorrow,’ 18.
[7] See for instance, B. VanSledright, The challenge of rethinking history education: On practices, theories, and policy, New York, NY: Routledge (2011); S. Lévesque, Thinking historically: Educating students for the 21st century. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press (2008); P. Seixas (ed.), Theorizing historical consciousness. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press (2006); S. Donavan and J. Bransford (eds), How students learn: History in the classroom. Washington, DC: National Academics Press (2005); K. Barton and L. Levstik, Teaching history for the common good. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates; an S. Wineburg, Historical thinking and other unnatural acts. Philadelphia: Temple University Press (2001).

____________________
Image Credits
© Wikimedia Commons (public Domain). Battle of the Plains of Abraham (13 September 1759) between English and French troops, during the Seven Years’ War (French and Indian War).
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2d/PlainsOfAbraham2007.jpg

Recommended Citation
Levesque, Stéphane: Between Memory Recall and Historical Consciousness: Implications for Education. In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 33, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-2593.

Copyright (c) 2014 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: julia.schreiner (at) degruyter.com.

 

 

 

Deutsch

 

“Ehrlich gesagt erinnere ich mich an gar nichts. Ich glaube, da gab es eine Menge Schwierigkeiten zwischen den französischen und englischen Kanadiern …” antwortete eine 17-jährige Schülerin auf die Aufforderung, die Geschichte Kanadas zu erzählen. Wie viele ihrer Altersgenossen reagierte sie zunächst verwirrt auf die Aufgabe, eine Darstellung der Geschichte Kanadas zu verfassen. Denn, so äußerte sie sich, “ich erinnere mich an gar nichts”. Erhebungen in der Öffentlichkeit, die eine Unzahl von “entscheidenden” Daten abfragen, erinnern die Kanadier regelmäßig an den katastrophalen Zustand der historischen Kenntnisse bei Jugendlichen. “Kanada versagt in Geschichte”, brachte es eine Zeitung gar auf den Punkt.[1]

 

Geschichtsbewusstsein ohne historisches Wissen?

Und doch wusste Annie erheblich mehr über Geschichte, als sie ursprünglich dachte. Sie war nicht nur in der Lage, eine einfache Geschichte Kanadas schriftlich anzufertigen, die Orientierung ihrer Erzählung brachte auch wichtige Aspekte ihres Geschichtsbewusstseins zum Vorschein. Sowohl Erinnerung wie Geschichtsbewusstsein handeln von der Vergangenheit, aber dazwischen bestehen subtile Unterschiede. Erinnerung ist das Überbleibsel des Lebens, sagt der französische Historiker Pierre Nora. Sie ist Gegenstand einer mentalen Dialektik von “Erinnern und Vergessen, unbewusst ihrer sukzessiven Deformation”.[2] Geschichtsbewusstsein ist hingegen die mentale Rekonstruktion und Periodisierung von historischer Information und Erfahrung, die sich im mentalen Haushalt eines Individuums abspielt. Während das Gedächtnis die Erinnerung gelebter Erfahrungen nährt, umfasst Geschichtsbewusstsein den komplexen Prozess der Verbindung von Vergangenheit, Gegenwart und der vorgestellten Zukunft zu einem bedeutungsvollen und sinnhaften Zeitverständnis.[3] Des Weiteren dient solches Bewusstsein als reflexive und praktische Funktion der Orientierung in der Zeit, um unsere gegenwärtigen Handlungen und Moralvorstellungen mit den historischen Tatsachen in Einklang zu bringen. Mithilfe ihres Geschichtsbewusstseins war Annie dazu in der Lage, einerseits ihre fehlende Erinnerung an die Geschichte Kanadas einzugestehen und sie zugleich mit der Feststellung von “jeder Menge Schwierigkeiten zwischen französischen und englischen Kanadiern” zu umschreiben. Mit dieser kurzen Sentenz lässt Annie mehr als Erinnerungsfragmente erkennen. Sie bietet eine verkürzte Darstellung der kanadischen Geschichte an, die durch historische Spannungen zwischen den beiden europäischen Gründungsnationen bestimmt wird: den Franzosen und den Briten.

Meistererzählung und Geschichtsbewusstsein

In der Logik ihrer Erzählung folgte die Entwicklung Kanadas nicht zielgerichtet und unverwechselbar einem Prozess der Nationenbildung, wie sie als kanadische Meistererzählung öffentlich vertreten wird. Im Gegenteil ist Annies Version wenig selbstsicher und zeichnet sich aber durch eine starke Betonung der Gespaltenheit des Landes aus. Interessanterweise haben frühere Studien ähnliche Muster der kanadischen Geschichte aufgezeigt.[4] Auch wenn Kanadier immer wieder ihre spärlichen Kenntnisse der Nationalgeschichte betonen, können sie ungeachtet dessen eine relativ kohärente und wirkungsmächtige historische Narration entwickeln. Im Falle der französischen Kanadier wird dabei regelmäßig deren Kampf um kollektive Selbstbehauptung betont. Solche Ergebnisse decken weitere zentrale Aspekte des Geschichtsbewusstseins auf: ein Verstehen der zeitlichen Dimensionen persönlicher Identität und ein Bewusstsein dafür. Mittels des Geschichtsbewusstseins kann ein Individuum seine persönliche Erfahrung (und Identität) einsetzen. Eine Geschichte einer nationalen Gemeinschaft zu erzählen, ist nicht nur ein bloßer Akt der Aufzählung historischer Ereignisse, sondern auch zweifelsfrei eine Art des “kulturellen Wissens”, das wichtige Informationen über die Gemeinschaft und das Selbst in sich trägt. Im Falle von Annies simpler Narration ist der Bezug zu “Schwierigkeiten der französischen und englischen Kanadier” keinesfalls banal. Es wird ihr dadurch möglich, ihre narrative Version der Geschichte Kanadas in eine größere zeitliche und gesellschaftliche Dimension zu verorten – eine, die bereits durch zahlreiche Generationen von französischen Kanadiern geteilt wird.

Werkzeuge des geschichtsbezogenen Lernens

Aber was hat dies mit historischem Lernen zu tun? Mindestens zwei zentrale Elemente des Geschichtsbewusstseins sollten Lehrende interessieren – seien dies SchullehrerInnen oder UniversitätsprofessorInnen: narrative Vorstellung und historisches Denken.[5] Zunächst macht es die Erforschung des Geschichtsbewusstseins möglich zu verstehen, wie die Vergangenheit genutzt wird. Für Rüsen ist die Fähigkeit, eine Narration zu entwerfen, zwingend erforderlich für die menschliche Existenz. Das Selbstverständnis des Menschen und die Bedeutung, die er der Welt gibt, enthält immer historische Bezüge. Auch die Vorgehensweise, mit der Individuen aus ihnen Sinn herstellen, besteht aus Narration. Das bedeutet, dass alle Lernenden über mehr oder weniger kohärente Narrationen ihrer kulturellen Gemeinschaft verfügen. Diese “grobe Vorstellung” über die Vergangenheit hilft ihnen bei der Orientierung im Leben und bei ihren Handlungen; daher sollte jeder Versuch, die Jugendlichen zu unterrichten, ihr in die Schule mitgebrachtes historisches Wissen und ihre Vorstellungen von Vergangenheit beachten. Kurz gesagt prägt Annies Vorstellung der kanadischen Geschichte mit den “Schwierigkeiten zwischen englischen und französischen Kanadiern” ihre Weltsicht und stellt den Hintergrund dar, vor dem alles neu erworbene Wissen sich einfügen muss. Dies stellt uns als Lehrende vor einige Schlüsselfragen: Welche Geschichten der Vergangenheit bringen SchülerInnen mit in die Schule? Welche kulturellen Werkzeuge nutzen sie, um ihre Versionen der Vergangenheit zu gestalten? Auf welche Weise nutzen sie diese Werkzeuge, um ihre Konzepte der Vergangenheit in die Gegenwart und die Zukunft zu übertragen?

Fähigkeit zur Dekonstruktion

Zweitens ist die Entwicklung des Geschichtsbewusstseins kein “Alles-oder-Nichts”-Lernprozess. In verschiedenen Studien, einschließlich unseren eigenen, fanden wir heraus, dass Lernende –  selbst auf universitärem Lernniveau – nicht notwendigerweise kritische historische Narrative entwerfen, sondern sich der Vergangenheit oft opportunistisch mit existierenden Narrativen und (Fehl-)Konzepten annähern.[6] Ich glaube, es ist die Aufgabe der Lehrenden, die in diesem Sinne existierenden weiten Vorstellungen von der Vergangenheit aufzulösen und ein historisches Denken zu etablieren. Dieser disziplinäre Prozess des kritischen Denkens eröffnet ihnen eine akademische Herangehensweise, die Einsichten darin ermöglicht, was historische Narrative sind und auch wie diese konstruiert und benutzt werden. Für Jahrzehnte haben WissenschaftlerInnen in Europa und Nordamerika Konzepte entworfen, wie man durch meta-geschichtliche Konzepte und Heuristik historisch denkt.[7] Sie haben die These aufgestellt, dass die Lernenden jenseits von faktischem Wissen und Meistererzählungen auch eine “disziplinäre Form des Wissens” benötigen. Dies verhelfe ihnen dazu, historische Behauptungen durch Fragen zu überprüfen: Welche Identität habe ich? Welchen Gruppen bin ich zugehörig? Warum ist diese Geschichte für mich wichtig? Soll ich das glauben? Aus welchem Grund? Haben sich die Verhältnisse in Kanada (oder sonst wo) verbessert? Auf welche Weise? Welche Belege gibt es dafür?

Vielleicht reichte es in der Vergangenheit aus, wenn Lernende sich bei Bedarf ihre kulturell relevanten Gedächtnisinformationen zu vergegenwärtigen mochten. In der heutigen komplexen Gegenwart einer sich rapide verändernden Welt reicht dieser Zugang zu Geschichte nicht mehr länger aus. Wir benötigen eine historisch gebildete Bürgerschaft, die in der Lage ist, sich in der Zeit zu orientieren mit kritischen und brauchbaren historischen Narrativen über die Welt, in der sie leben.

 

____________________

 

Literatur

  • Carr, David: Time, Narrative, and History. Bloomington 1986.
  • Rüsen, Jörn: History: Narration, Interpretation, Orientation. New York 2005.
  • Wertsch, James: Voices of Collective Remembering. New York 2002.

 

Externe Links

 

____________________

[1] Chalifoux, Marc / Stewart, J.D.M.: “Canada is failing history.” In: The Globe and Mail. (Ausg. v. 16.6. 2009). http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/canada-is-failing-history/article4276621/ (letzter Zugriff 22.9.2014).
[2] Nora, Pierre: Between Memory and History: Les lieux de mémoire. In: Représentations 26 (Spring 1989): S. 8-9.
[3] Rüsen, Jörn: History: Narration, Interpretation, Orientation. New York 2005.
[4] Vgl. Lévesque, Stéphane / Croteau, Jean Philipe / Gani, Raphaël: La conscience historique de jeunes Franco-Ontariens d’Ottawa: histoire et sentiment d’appartenance, Historical Studies in Education (forthcoming), 24 p.; Létourneau, Jocelyn: Si je me souviens? Le passé du Québec dans la conscience de sa jeunesse. Anjou, QC: Fides 2014; Lévesque, Stéphane / Létourneau, Jocelyn / Gani, Raphaël: A Giant with Clay Feet: Québec Students and Their Historical Consciousness of the Nation. In: International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research 11 (2013) 2; Gani, Raphaël: L’histoire nationale dans ses grandes lignes: enquête internationale sur la conscience historique. In: Canadian Issues (Spring 2012), S. 156‐72; Robichaud, Marc: L’histoire de l’Acadie telle que racontée par les jeunes francophones du Nouveau-Brunswick: construction et déconstruction d’un récit historique. In: Acadiensis 40 (2011) 2, S. 33-69; and Létourneau, Jocelyn / Moisan, Sabrina: Mémoire et récit de l’aventure historique du Québec chez les jeunes Québécois d’héritage canadien-français: coup de sonde, amorce d’analyse des résultats, questionnement. In: Canadian Historical Review 84 (2004) 2, S. 325-357.
[5] Als Beispiel für eine ausführliche Diskussion über die damit verbundenen Herausforderungen für den Geschichtsunterricht vgl. Lee, Peter: ‘Walking backwards into tomorrow’: Historical consciousness and understanding history. In: International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research 7 (2002), S. 1-46; und Tutiaux-Guillon, Nicole: L’histoire enseignée entre coutume disciplinaire et formation de la conscience historique: l’exemple français. In Ders. / Nourisson, Didier (Hrsg.): Identités, mémoires, conscience historique. St-Étienne, FR 2003, S. 27-39.
[6] Vgl. Lee 2002, S. 18.
[7] Vgl. Z.B. VanSledright, Bruce: The challenge of rethinking history education: On practices, theories, and policy, New York 2011; Lévesque, Stéphane: Thinking historically: Educating students for the 21st century. Toronto 2008; Seixas, Peter: (Hrsg.): Theorizing historical consciousness. Toronto 2006; Donavan Suzanne / Bransford, John (Hrsg.): How students learn: History in the classroom. Washington, DC 2005; Barton Keith / Levstik, Linda: Teaching history for the common good. Mahwah, 2004; und Wineburg, Samuel: Historical thinking and other unnatural acts. Philadelphia 2001.

____________________
Abbildungsnachweis
© Wikimedia Commons (gemeinfrei). Schlacht auf der Abraham-Ebene (13.9.1759) zwischen Engländern und Franzosen, während des Siebenjährigen Krieges (Franzosen- und Indianerkrieg).
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2d/PlainsOfAbraham2007.jpg

Übersetzung aus dem Englischen
von Marco Zerwas

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Levesque, Stéphane: Zwischen Erinnerung und Geschichtsbewusstsein: Folgerungen für den Unterricht. In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 33, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-2593.

Copyright (c) 2014 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: julia.schreiner (at) degruyter.com.

 

 

Français

 

“Honnêtement, je ne me rappelle de rien. Mais je pense qu’il y avait beaucoup de troubles avec les Français canadien et les Anglais canadien….” Voilà la première réaction d’une élève de 17 ans à qui l’on a demandé de raconter l’histoire du Canada. Comme plusieurs de ses pairs, Annie fut d’abord surprise par la tâche de rédiger un court récit de l’aventure historique du Canada car, comme elle l’affirme, “je ne me rappelle de rien“. Plusieurs sondages d’opinion rappellent périodiquement aux Canadiens le manque inquiétant de connaissances historiques chez les jeunes. La situation est telle qu’un quotidien national a même affirmé que c’est “tout le Canada qui échoue son cours d’histoire“.[1]

 

La conscience historique sans la connaissance?

Sans nier la situation actuelle, les propos de notre élève, Annie, révèlent davantage que sa simple ignorance de l’histoire. Non seulement a t-elle été en mesure de nous fournir un bref récit de sa société mais l’orientation et la vision de son récit en disent long sur ce qu’est la conscience historique. Mémoire et conscience historique sont tous deux en relation avec le passé. Mais il existe d’importantes différences entre les deux. La mémoire, comme le rappelle Pierre Nora, c’est le résidu de la vie ouverte à la dialectique du souvenir et de l’amnésie, inconsciente de ses déformations successives…“[2]. La conscience historique, quant à elle, est la reconstruction mentale de ce qui n’est plus à partir d’expériences et d’informations historiques qui sont portées à un niveau second d’intellection et d’appropriation. Alors que la mémoire nourrit les souvenirs de ce qu’un individu a vécu ou de ce qui lui a été transmis, la conscience historique met en relation le passé, le présent et l’avenir possible[3]. Elle appelle la pensée réflexive et la conscience temporelle. Elle vise une actualisation du passé dans nos vies permettant à tout individu de juger, de choisir et d’agir. C’est en faisant appel à sa conscience historique qu’Annie a pu déclarer ne plus se souvenir de rien mais tout de même offrir un bref récit qui raconte beaucoup de troubles avec les français canadien et les anglais canadien. Dans cette formule, Annie présente davantage que des faits bruts issus de la mémoire. Elle offre un condensé métahistorique qui est de l’ordre de la signification, de ce que représente l’histoire canadienne telle que définie par la tension historique entre les deux peuples fondateurs: les Français et les Anglais.

Méta-récit et conscience historique

Selon cette logique, le développement du pays n’a pas suivi le cheminement progressif du grand récit canadien caractérisé par une vision nationale du nation-building. Au contraire, son texte exprime une vision particulière de l’aventure historique canadienne qui trouve comme point d’origine la dualité même du pays. Fait intéressant, de récentes études révèlent une tendance similaire au pays[4]. Bien que les Canadiens avouent volontiers leur ignorance du passé, ils sont tout à fait aptes à mettre en récit le passé de leur société; récits qui chez plusieurs Canadiens français mettent en lumière la prévalence des luttes du groupe pour la survie. Ces études dévoilent également une autre dimension de la conscience historique: elle permet à tout individu de se penser dans le temps et ainsi de nourrir son identité, de prendre conscience de son appartenance à un groupe qui a une histoire, une vision temporelle. En ce sens, mettre en récit le passé de sa société ne se réduit pas à énoncer une série de faits issus de la mémoire mais plutôt à présenter une vision du passé collectif  qui a un sens pour soi. Dans le cas de notre élève, l’idée selon laquelle il y avait beaucoup de troubles avec les français canadien et les anglais canadien n’est pas insignifiante. Elle permet l’appropriation d’une certaine vision narrative du Canada qui s’inscrit dans un espace temporel et sociétal bien défini, celui du Canada français.

L’apprentissage historique

Quel lien ont tous ces propos avec l’éducation historique? La conscience historique permet une réflexion qui devrait intéresser les éducateurs d’écoles et d’universités pour au moins deux raisons: l’orientation narrative et la pensée historique[5]. D’abord, la conscience historique permet de mieux comprendre comment les individus, incluant les jeunes, font usage du passé dans leurs pratiques réelles. Pour Rüsen, la narrativité n’est pas facultative à la vie humaine. Le besoin de comprendre et donner sens au monde qui nous entoure et celui qui nous précède implique une démarche par laquelle l’individu transforme le passé et rend son actualisation possible par l’histoire: le récit. C’est donc dire que tout apprenant possède certaines visions historiques ou certains schémas narratifs lui permettant de s’orienter dans le temps. Pour notre élève, Annie, les nombreux troubles avec les français canadien et les anglais canadien expriment une intellection particulière du passé et ce faisant, participent ou influencent ses nouveaux apprentissages de l’histoire. Comme pédagogues, ce constat nous amène à poser certaines questions : Quels récits de l’aventure historique de leur société les jeunes apportent-ils dans leur bagage cognitif? Quels outils culturels (cultural tools) utilisent-ils pour façonner leur vision du passé? Dans quelle mesure ces outils affectent-ils leurs conceptions du passé, du présent et de l’avenir possible?

Développer la pensée historique

Ensuite, le développement de la conscience historique ne s’effectue pas en mode binaire du tout ou rien. Nous avons découvert dans nos études que les apprenants, même au niveau universitaire, ne produisent pas forcément des récits critiques et conçoivent souvent le passé collectif à partir de topiques historiales et de (pré)conceptions des prêts-à-penser de la mémoire.[6] J’estime que l’une des missions de l’éducation historique est précisément de problématiser la mise en récit du passé et d’offrir à nos jeunes les outils de la pensée historique dont ils ont besoin pour leur permettre de créer de meilleurs récits historiques qu’ils pourront utiliser pour s’orienter et faire face aux défis d’un monde complexe, diversifié, et de plus en plus global et multiculturel[7]. Dans un passé pas si lointain il était peut-être convenable, et même souhaitable, pour les jeunes de mémoriser une certaine mémoire collective mais dans le monde d’aujourd’hui, cette conception de l’histoire scolaire est largement insuffisante pour former nos citoyens de demain.

 

____________________

 

Literature

  • Carr, D. (1986). Time, Narrative, and History. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.
  • Rüsen, Jörn. (2005). History: Narration, Interpretation, Orientation. New York, NY: Berghahn Books.
  • Wertsch, J. (2002). Voices of Collective Remembering. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

 

Liens externe

 

____________________

[1] Chalifoux and J.D.M. Stewart, “Canada is failing history.” The Globe and Mail. (16 Juin, 2009). Disponible: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/canada-is-failing-history/article4276621/ (dernier accès le 22 Septembre 2014).
[
2] P. Nora, “Between Memory and History: Les lieux de mémoire,” Représentations, 26 (Printemps 1989): 8-9.
[3] J. Rüsen, History: Narration, Interpretation, Orientation. New York, NY: Berghahn Books (2005).
[4] Voir S. Lévesque, J.P. Croteau, and R. Gani, “La conscience historique de jeunes Franco-Ontariens d’Ottawa: histoire et sentiment d’appartenance,” Historical Studies in Education (forthcoming), 24 p.; J. Létourneau, Si je me souviens? Le passé du Québec dans la conscience de sa jeunesse. Anjou, QC: Fides (2014); S. Lévesque, J. Létourneau, and R. Gani. “A Giant with Clay Feet: Québec Students and Their Historical Consciousness of the Nation.” International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research 11, 2 (2013): R. Gani, “L’histoire nationale dans ses grandes lignes: enquête internationale sur la conscience historique,” Canadian Issues, (Spring 2012): 156‐72; M. Robichaud, “L’histoire de l’Acadie telle que racontée par les jeunes francophones du Nouveau-Brunswick : construction et déconstruction d’un récit historique,” Acadiensis 40, 2 (2011): 33-69 ; and J. Létourneau and S. Moisan, “Mémoire et récit de l’aventure historique du Québec chez les jeunes Québécois d’héritage canadien-français: coup de sonde, amorce d’analyse des résultats, questionnement,” Canadian Historical Review 84, 2 (2004): 325-357
[5] Pour une analyse plus détaillée des implications pour l’éducation, voir P. Lee, “‘Walking backwards into tomorrow’: Historical consciousness and understanding history, International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research 7 (2002): 1-46; et N. Tutiaux-Guillon, “L’histoire enseignée entre coutume disciplinaire et formation de la conscience historique: l’exemple français,” In N. Tutiaux-Guillon and D. Nourisson (Eds.), Identités, mémoires, conscience historique. St-Étienne, FR: Publications de l’Université St-Étienne (2003).
[6] Lee, “‘Walking backwards into tomorrow,’ 18.
[7] Voir notamment B. VanSledright, The challenge of rethinking history education: On practices, theories, and policy, New York, NY: Routledge (2011); S. Lévesque, Thinking historically: Educating students for the 21st century. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press (2008); P. Seixas (ed.), Theorizing historical consciousness. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press (2006); S. Donavan and J. Bransford (eds), How students learn: History in the classroom. Washington, DC: National Academics Press (2005); K. Barton and L. Levstik, Teaching history for the common good. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates; et S. Wineburg, Historical thinking and other unnatural acts. Philadelphia: Temple University Press (2001).

____________________

Crédits illustration
© Wikimedia Commons (domaine public). Bataille des plaines d’Abraham (le 13 septembre 1759) entre l’armee britannique et les Français, durant la guerre de Sept Ans.
 http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Volgograd_city_sign.jpg

Citation recommandée
Levesque, Stéphane: Entre la mémoire et la conscience historique: quelques implications pour l’éducation. In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 33, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-2593.

Copyright (c) 2014 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: julia.schreiner (at) degruyter.com.

 


The post Between Memory Recall and Historical Consciousness: Implications for Education appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/2-2014-33/memory-recall-historical-consciousness-implications-education/

Weiterlesen

Abschied vom Geschichtsbewusstsein?

 

In der Geschichtsdidaktik gibt es offenbar wieder ein verstärktes Interesse an Fragen der Theorie. Das zeigt nicht nur die Gründung eines neuen Arbeitskreises in der Konferenz für Geschichtsdidaktik, das zeigen vor allem auch die Publikationen, die in den vergangenen Wochen und Monaten in diesem Blog-Journal erschienen sind. Christian Heuer fordert in einem provokativen und zugleich äußerst anregenden Beitrag, tradierte Begriffe und Konzepte infrage zu stellen. Diese Forderung beziehen einige Geschichtsdidaktiker offenbar auch auf die Zentralkategorie Geschichtsbewusstsein. Steht sie damit grundsätzlich zur Disposition?

 

„Was ist denn Geschichtsbewusstsein?“

Wirft man einen Blick auf die Argumente der Kritiker, dann gibt es scheinbar drei Gründe, die die Kategorie des Geschichtsbewusstseins in Misskredit bringen. Das erste Argument ist ein pragmatisches. „Was ist denn“, so fragt Christoph Pallaske hier in diesem BlogJournal „– kurz und knapp auf den Punkt gebracht – Geschichtsbewusstsein?“ Einerseits sind diese Frage und der mit ihr verbundene Wunsch nach praxisrelevanten „verbindlichen Antworten“ nachvollziehbar. Andererseits lebt Wissenschaft nun einmal von Kontroversen, nicht von endgültigen Antworten. Und zentrale Kategorien lassen sich wohl auch deshalb nicht kurz und knapp auf den Punkt bringen, weil sie dazu einfach zu komplex sind. Unabhängig davon wäre es allerdings zielführend, wenn sich die Geschichtsdidaktik stärker um die Synthese unterschiedlicher Geschichtsbewusstseinstheorien bemühen würde. Zugleich gibt es einen Bedarf an weiterer Differenzierung und psychologischer bzw. neurowissenschaftlicher Fundierung. Und nicht zuletzt müsste die Geschichtsdidaktik über die Systematik ihres Kategoriengefüges insgesamt neu nachdenken.1 Das zweite Argument ist ein empirisches und trotz bemerkenswerter Fortschritte in den vergangenen Jahren nach wie vor relevant. Immer noch sind einschlägige Geschichtsbewusstseinstheorien nicht oder nur teilweise empirisch validiert; immer noch mangelt es an plausiblen Operationalisierungen; immer noch sind Studien zur Entwicklung und Graduierung von Geschichtsbewusstsein rar gesät bzw. in ihren Befunden widersprüchlich; immer noch wissen wir viel zu wenig darüber, wie Lehrerinnen und Lehrer reflektiertes Geschichtsbewusstsein erfolgreich fördern können. Für die geschichtsdidaktische Empirie bleibt also auch in Zukunft viel zu tun.2 Das dritte Argument schließlich betrifft die theoretischen Prämissen. Bärbel Völkel hat hier vor Kurzem die These aufgestellt, die Kategorie des Geschichtsbewusstseins (und im Zusammenhang damit die der Geschichtskultur) sei unzeitgemäß, denn sie bedeute „stets auch, ethnozentrisch zu denken“.

Eine nach wie vor aktuelle Kategorie

Dieses Argument mag diskursstrategisch effektiv sein, überzeugend ist es nicht. Jörn Rüsen, auf den Bärbel Völkel Bezug nimmt, hat sich in seiner Historik erneut für Geschichtsbewusstsein und Geschichtskultur als zentrale Kategorien der Geschichtsdidaktik ausgesprochen.3 Er sieht zwar das Problem des Ethnozentrismus, plädiert aber dafür, „an der Menschheitsdimension der Geschichtskultur [und damit zugleich des Geschichtsbewusstseins, H.T.] festzuhalten“ und auf diese Weise „die monozentrische Perspektivierung des ethnozentrischen Denkens“ aufzubrechen. Ganz ausdrücklich spricht Rüsen sogar vom „Polyzentrismus der einen Welt“.4 Und Karl-Ernst Jeismann, dessen Beiträge an Relevanz nichts verloren haben, aber zum Teil überraschenderweise nicht rezipiert werden,5 schrieb bereits 1988: „Geschichtsbewußtsein [...] macht die Kommunikation verschiedener Personen oder Gruppen, Völker oder Religionen möglich, ja, erforderlich und erweist sich […] als ein tendenziell ,weltbürgerliches‘ Bewußtsein“.6 Angesichts dessen stellt sich die Frage, ob die Kategorie des Geschichtsbewusstseins nicht weitaus zeitgemäßer ist als ihre teilweise unzeitgemäße Rezeption.

Emanzipation als Alternative?

Unabhängig davon kann man natürlich über Alternativen nachdenken. Bärbel Völkel erinnert in diesem Zusammenhang an Annette Kuhns emanzipatorische Geschichtsdidaktik. Man muss die scharfsinnige Kritik, die die Protagonisten anderer Konzepte an Kuhns anspruchsvollem Ansatz geübt haben,7 nicht unbedingt teilen. Man kann aber die Frage stellen, ob es sich bei der Emanzipations-Kategorie um eine echte Alternative handelt. Zum einen hat Peter Schulz-Hageleit bereits vor 15 Jahren den Vorschlag gemacht, das Verhältnis zwischen Geschichtsbewusstsein und Emanzipation nicht als Gegensatz zu beschreiben, sondern komplementär zu fassen.8 Wäre es im Anschluss an diese Überlegung nicht naheliegend, Emanzipation – verstanden als eine Form kritischer Sinnbildung – als einen bestimmten Modus historischen Denkens in Rüsens und Jeismanns Konzept des Geschichtsbewusstseins zu integrieren? Zum anderen sollte man darüber nachdenken, ob es disziplinpolitisch überzeugend ist, Geschichtsbewusstsein als Zentralkategorie der Geschichtsdidaktik nicht nur zur Diskussion (das ist zweifelsohne sinnvoll, dazu regen Christian Heuer und andere zu Recht an), sondern grundsätzlich zur Disposition zu stellen. Denn immerhin hat die Kategorie Geschichtsbewusstsein nicht nur den entscheidenden Vorteil, dass sie fachspezifisch ist,9 sie ist auch international anschlussfähig,10 und sie ist nach der Irritation, die die geschichtsdidaktische Kompetenzdebatte nicht nur bei vielen Lehrerinnen und Lehrern ausgelöst hat, vielleicht die einzige tragfähige kategoriale Brücke zwischen Theorie und Praxis, zwischen Wissenschaft und Unterricht. In Deutschland jedenfalls gibt es im Moment kaum ein Bundesland, das in seinen Lehrplänen für das Fach Geschichte ohne die Kategorie Geschichtsbewusstsein auskommt. Ganz im Gegenteil – in den meisten Lehrplänen spielt sie eine zentrale Rolle.

 

Literatur

  • Jeismann, Karl-Ernst: Geschichtsbewußtsein als zentrale Kategorie der Geschichtsdidaktik. In: Gerhard Schneider (Hrsg.): Geschichtsbewußtsein und historisch-politisches Lernen, Pfaffenweiler 1988 (= Jahrbuch für Geschichtsdidaktik, Bd. 1), S. 1-24.
  • Rüsen, Jörn: Historik. Theorie der Geschichtswissenschaft, Köln 2013.
  • Schulz-Hageleit, Peter: Emanzipation und Geschichtsbewußtsein. Anregungen für die Wiederaufnahme und Fortsetzung einer Diskussion. In: Arnold, Udo u. a. (Hrsg.): Stationen einer Hochschullaufbahn. Festschrift für Annette Kuhn zum 65. Geburtstag, Dortmund 1999, S. 52-61.

Externe Links

 


Abbildungsnachweis
© Coyau, Wikimedia Commons. Versailles, salon de la guerre, Clio écrivant l’histoire du Roi, von Antoine Coysevox.

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Thünemann, Holger: Abschied vom Geschichtsbewusstsein? In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 5, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-1266.

Copyright (c) 2014 by Oldenbourg Verlag and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: julia.schreiner (at) degruyter.com

The post Abschied vom Geschichtsbewusstsein? appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/2-2014-5/abschied-vom-geschichtsbewusstsein/

Weiterlesen

“Sinnbildung über Zeiterfahrung” – eine Leerformel?

 

“Auch in der Geschichtsdidaktik gibt es Formeln, die immer wiederholt werden – Topoi des didaktischen Denkens. Sie finden sich in Aufsätzen akademischer Didaktiker und in Lehrplänen der Bildungsverwaltungen ebenso wie in Arbeiten von Studierenden und in Unterrichtsentwürfen.” So beginnt ein Eintrag vom Oktober 2009 auf der Website von Andreas Körber.1 Zu den angesprochenen Formeln oder Topoi zählt gewiss Jörn Rüsens Wendung von der “Sinnbildung über Zeiterfahrung”. Sie wird – über die eigene Lektüre hinaus vermittelt Google davon einen schnellen Eindruck – an allen möglichen Orten und in allen möglichen Kontexten aufgegriffen, zumeist ohne Nachweis und ohne genauere argumentative Einbettung.

 

Was heißt “Sinnbildung über Zeiterfahrung”?

Wie wird eine Leserin (oder Leser) diese Formel wahrnehmen, die ihr zuvor noch nicht begegnet ist? Sie wird vielleicht darüber nachdenken, dass die deutsche Sprache die schöne, aber auch gefährliche Eigenart besitzt, vielfältige Zusammensetzungen von Substantiven zu erlauben. Üblicherweise bestehen diese Substantivkomposita aus einem Grund- und einem Bestimmungswort. Das Grundwort steht hinten, es legt in der Regel den Sinn des Kompositums fest und steuert den grammatischen Kontext. Grundwort von “Sinnbildung” ist “Bildung”. Es bestimmt den Bezug zum nachfolgenden “über Zeiterfahrung”: also “Bildung über Zeiterfahrung”. Nein, das kann nicht gemeint sein, so lässt sich das Kompositum nicht auflösen. Gemeint ist vielmehr “Bildung von Sinn über Zeiterfahrung”. Allerdings kann man das eigentlich nicht in der Kurzform des Kompositums ausdrücken, weil es nicht den genannten Regeln entspricht. Das irritiert unseren vorgestellten Leser (oder Leserin).

Sinn, Erfahrung, Zeit

Was wird er weiter denken? Was heißt eigentlich “über Zeiterfahrung”? Es gibt den “Sinn von”, aber gibt es “Sinn über”?2 Was soll die Präposition bedeuten? Ist vielleicht gemeint “Sinn in Bezug auf” oder “Sinn mithilfe von”? Das wäre nicht unbedingt dasselbe. “Sinn mithilfe von Zeiterfahrung” würde wohl heißen, dass es sich um die persönliche Zeiterfahrung desjenigen handeln muss, der sich dann “darüber” seinen Sinn bildet. Bei der Variante “Sinn in Bezug auf Zeiterfahrung” könnte vielleicht auch “Zeiterfahrung” anderer Menschen gemeint sein. Aber was heißt denn überhaupt “Zeiterfahrung”? Ist es ganz allgemein die Wahrnehmung von Zeitabläufen? Die Unterscheidung verschiedener Zeitebenen? Oder geht es um Erfahrungen, die irgendjemand in der Zeit, also in zeitlichen Abläufen, die in der Vergangenheit liegen, gemacht hat? Erfahrungen brauchen allerdings immer ein Subjekt, das sie macht. Also noch einmal die Frage: Wessen Erfahrung ist gemeint – die eigene oder (auch) die anderer Menschen? Und wer sind gegebenenfalls diese anderen: Zeitgenossen oder auch Menschen aus früheren Zeiten? Wie können wir überhaupt etwas über die Erfahrung anderer wissen? Sie müsste ja in irgendeiner Form überliefert sein, und mit dieser Überlieferung müsste man sich in spezifischer Weise beschäftigen.

Was es heißt, bleibt unklar

Hier hilft unserer vorgestellten Leserin (oder Leser) die Formel nicht weiter, sie muss einen Blick auf den Kontext werfen. Sie liest also beispielsweise: “Was heißt Erzählen als Fundamentaloperation des Geschichtsbewusstseins? Gemeint ist etwas sehr Elementares und Grundsätzliches: ein sinnbildender Umgang mit der Erfahrung von Zeit, der notwendig ist, um die Zeitlichkeit des eigenen Lebens deutend verarbeiten und handelnd bewältigen zu können. Erzählen ist Sinnbildung über Zeiterfahrung, es macht aus Zeit Sinn.”3 Aha, es geht also um die “Zeitlichkeit des eigenen Lebens”. Doch nein, das ist gewissermaßen nur die Anwendungsebene. Zuvor ist ganz allgemein die Rede von “der Erfahrung von Zeit”. Das hilft nicht weiter, denn es stellen sich erneut die eben schon aufgeworfenen Fragen nach der Art dieser Erfahrung, nach ihrem Subjekt und den Quellen unserer Kenntnis über sie. Welche Tätigkeit nun eigentlich hinter der Formulierung “sinnbildender Umgang mit der Erfahrung von Zeit” steckt, bleibt unklar.

Nur eine formelhafte Chiffre?

Es gibt also eine ganze Menge Fragen, die sich aus der Formel von der Sinnbildung ergeben können. Ob alle, die sie verwenden, diese für sich bedacht und beantwortet haben? Wohl eher nicht. Die Formel fungiert gewissermaßen als Chiffre dafür, dass man im didaktischen Diskurs steht und eine irgendwie moderne, kulturwissenschaftlich und erzähltheoretisch fundierte Auffassung von Geschichtsbewusstsein hat. Eigentlich weiß doch ohnehin jeder, was gemeint ist – Nachfragen und Erläuterungen erübrigen sich. Um Missverständnissen vorzubeugen: Es steht außer Zweifel, dass Rüsen unser geschichtsdidaktisches Denken auf vielfältige Weise befruchtet hat. Aber muss es immerzu diese Formel sein? Ist sie nicht, isoliert verwendet, wahlweise banal oder unverständlich, eigentlich eine Leerformel? Freilich: Vielleicht macht gerade diese gewisse Unbestimmtheit und Dunkelheit den Charme und die Beliebtheit – sozusagen die “Formelfähigkeit” – einer solchen “narrativen Abbreviatur” (Rüsen)4 aus.

 

 

Literatur

  • Rüsen, Jörn: Historische Orientierung. Über die Art des Geschichtsbewusstseins, sich in der Zeit zurechtzufinden, Köln 1994.
  • ders.: Historische Vernunft. Grundzüge einer Historik I: Die Grundlagen der Geschichtswissenschaft, Göttingen 1983.
  • Pandel, Hans-Jürgen: Geschichtsbewusstsein. In: Ulrich Mayer u.a. (Hrsg.): Wörterbuch Geschichtsdidaktik, Schwalbach/Ts., 1. Aufl. 2006, 2. Aufl. 2009, S. 69f.

Externe Links


Abbildungsnachweis
© Karin Jung: Wie schnell doch die Zeit vergeht / Pixelio.de

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Sauer, Michael: “Sinnbildung über Zeiterfahrung”. In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 4, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-1203.

Copyright (c) 2014 by Oldenbourg Verlag and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: julia.schreiner (at) degruyter.com.

The post “Sinnbildung über Zeiterfahrung” – eine Leerformel? appeared first on Public History Weekly.

Quelle: http://public-history-weekly.oldenbourg-verlag.de/2-2014-4/sinnbildung-ueber-zeiterfahrung/

Weiterlesen